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My water turned brown about this time last year. How do I stop it from happening again? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: My water turned brown about this time last year. How do I stop it from happening again?

Q: My water turned brown about this time last year. How do I stop it from happening again?

Nick – Charlestown, WV

A: There’s only one thing worse than green water—and that’s brown water. In some ponds or water features, the end of summer or beginning of fall brings with it this discolored water. It’s caused by one of two reasons:

  • Debris Tea: When leaves or pine needles fall into your pond, the tannins in them create a type of all-natural debris tea, which turns the clean and clear water in your backyard feature a shade of brown. This is the most common cause of tea-colored water.
  • Sediment Stew: If you have a lot of floating particulates or sediment in your pond, playful fish, wind or some other action can sometimes disrupt it, mixing it into your water column via your pump or aeration system.

To determine what’s causing the brown water, grab a glass jar from your kitchen, dunk it in your pond and fill it with the water. Let it sit for 24 hours and take a close look at the results. Is the water still tea-colored? Then you have tannin-colored debris tea. Do you see sediment settled at the bottom of the glass? Then you have some sediment stew.

Once you pinpoint what’s causing the brown water, here’s how to treat the problem.

  1. Clean It Up: Because both causes start with an abundance of organics in the water, your first course of action is to clean the bottom of your pond to remove any muck, leaves and remaining debris with a pond vacuum or skimmer net.
  2. Water Change: Next, do a partial (10 to 25 percent) water change, which will freshen things up and clear the water. Don’t forget to add a water conditioner to treat the water for your finned pals.
  3. Add Beneficial Bacteria: If you have sediment stew, add some Nature’s Defense® (if water temps are above 50°F) or Seasonal Defense® (if water temps are below 50°F). The beneficial bacteria will digest any accumulated organic debris and eliminate the brown water.
  4. Use Activated Carbon: If you have debris tea, toss a media bag filled with Pond Logic® Activated Carbon into your pond. The carbon will absorb the tannins, leaving behind clear water.

To prevent the discoloration from happening again, keep the organics out of the pond. Clean up the muck regularly with a skimmer net or vacuum, and when the leaves or pine needles start falling, cover the water with pond netting, like the The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ or The Pond Guy® Premium Pond Netting.

Pond Talk: Have the leaves started falling in your neck of the woods yet? If so, what do you do to keep them out of your water?

Remove Discoloration From Leaves & Debris - View Pond Logic® Activated Carbon

My skimmer keeps clogging with leaves, how can I keep them out of my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

My skimmer keeps clogging with leaves, how can I keep them out of my pond?

Q: My skimmer keeps clogging with leaves, how can I keep them out of my pond?

Joyce – Stewartstown, PA

A: There’s no surer sign of fall than falling leaves. Unfortunately, when those leaves land in your pond or water garden, they can create a water-quality mess. As they break down and decompose, they can turn your water brown and leave behind muck and detritus.

Thank goodness for pond netting.

These temporary covers keep leaves, pine needles and other debris from landing in your water feature. You can purchase several different types—but which one is right for you?

To help you choose, ask yourself these three simple questions:

1. How long do you intend to use the netting?

Many of us are pinching our pennies these days, and so the less-expensive one-season-use net, like DeWitt Pond Netting, is an attractive option. The 3/4-inch black polypropylene mesh, which comes in a range of sizes to fit just about any pond, prevents debris (and predators, too) from getting into your pond without restricting air flow or views.

For a little more money, however, you could purchase a higher-quality net/pond cover system, the Nycon Big Top Pond Cover, which can be used year after year. Also available in a range of sizes, this pond cover features a netting with a hemmed, fray-resistant border; center pole(s); brass stake grommets; and aluminum stakes that can weather years of use. The net is made with 1/4-inch black nylon mesh, which keeps some of the smallest debris from entering your pond.

2. What types of leaves will be landing in and gathering around your pond?

Look around your yard. What kinds of tress do you (and your neighbors) have? If you have trees with larger leaves, like maple or oak, you can easily rake up the blowing leaves from around your pond, scoop them out of your pond with a portable pond net or skimmer, and prevent them from landing in there with a basic 5/8-inch nylon mesh netting, like The Pond Guy® Pond Cover Net.

If you have pine needles and smaller leaves around, however, you’ll need to cover your pond or water garden with a tighter-weave mesh, such as The Pond Guy® Fine Mesh Cover Net. This clear, heavy-duty, 1/8-inch mesh netting prevents stubbornly small debris from landing in your pond while still allowing light to shine through. It includes plastic stakes to secure the netting.

3. What is your main goal?

Are you a no-muss, no-fuss kind of water gardener who avoids pond chores like the plague? Then you should invest in a tent-type netting system with a center hub, like the The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ Net Kit. This fully adjustable unit with an aluminum frame will fit most pond configurations. It supports a swath of durable, black 1/4-inch mesh, which keep debris from entering the pond. And the kit includes 30 metal stakes to ensure the unit stays in place.

If, however, you want to see your fish, and you’re OK with a few scattered leaves and doing a bit of work to remove them, then consider one of the fine, economy or premium surface netting options, like ç Fine Mesh Cover Net, the DeWitt Economy Pond Netting or The Pond Guy® Pond Cover Net.

Pond Talk: What tricks do you use to keep leaves from landing in your pond or water feature?

The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ - Keep Leaves & Predators Out

My water is brown! What should I do? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

My water is brown! What should I do?

Q: My water is brown! What should I do?

Dale – Anselmo, NE

A: In the spring and summer, many pond owners complain of green water caused by algae blooms—but in the late summer and fall, brown water causes headaches. If your pond or water garden has taken on a tea-colored hue, follow these simple steps to get your water back to its crystal-clear self.

An Optical Illusion?

First of all, take a closer look at the water and determine whether it’s really brown or just reflecting dead debris in the pond. Grab a clear glass, dip it in the water and hold it up to the light. Is it clear? Then it’s reflecting pond debris. Is it brown? Then the water has been colored by tannins released by dead leaves, similar to what happens when you steep your breakfast tea.

Clear Water: Add Bacteria

If your water is clear, you can minimize the brown-water optical illusion by using a natural bacteria, like Pond Logic® Seasonal Defense®, to help decompose the muck and accumulated debris on the bottom of your pond. The beneficial microorganisms found in this cooler-weather additive break down the organic materials, leaving your water looking clean and clear.

Brown Water: Add Carbon

If your water is brown, you can use Pond Logic® Activated Carbon to absorb and correct the tea-colored discoloration. To use the carbon, pour the granules in a mesh bag and place it in an area of fast-flowing water, such as in your skimmer or waterfall. Leave it there until the carbon absorbs the dissolved organics. Typically, 4 to 6 pounds will treat 1,000 gallons of water for two to three months.

Remove Dead Debris

In addition to either adding beneficial bacteria or using activated carbon, you should also remove any accumulated dead or decomposing debris in your pond with a vacuum like the ClearVac™. If leaves or other blown-in debris continue to be a problem during the fall months, consider covering your water feature with netting, like the The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ Net Kit.

Pond Talk: Have you had success using activated carbon in your water feature?

Pond Logic® Activated Carbon - From Brown To Clear Water...FAST!

How can I keep leaves out of my pond? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

How can I keep leaves out of my pond?

How can I keep leaves out of my pond? Rick – Birds, IL

This Tent’s Not for Camping

You may not want to admit it yet, but the summer season is coming to a close. While we love the mild weather and the changing colors of the trees, us water garden owners have to turn our attention to the falling leaves. No worries however, we have one simple tool that you can use to avoid having to deal with leaves falling into your water garden.

We are of course talking about pond netting. If you dealt with Herons in the summer you may already have a pond net on hand. While they are great for keeping unwanted predators out of your pond they are more commonly used for keeping leaves and other blowing debris from falling in. There are two basic styles of pond netting you can purchase. The most simplistic version of this being a pre cut piece of mesh netting. This netting is available in an Economy Grade which is ideal for single season use or a Heavy Duty version. You can pull this mesh tight across the surface of your pond and secure it using stakes or rocks. This application works well for water gardens that may receive minimal amounts of debris. If you are in a heavily wooded area or are prone to massive amounts of debris you will be better off utilizing a Pond Protector Net Kit that implements a domed design to better protect your pond. The netting included with the kit extends beyond the tent-style frame allowing you to pull netting along the contours of your pond so there are no gaps left open for debris to enter.

Keeping leaves out of your pond in the fall will help keep the pond clean and manageable going into the colder seasons and will ensure a faster, easier cleanout and start up next season. Leaves left in the pond to decompose tend to create “tea-colored” water due to the tannins they release in the decomposition process. You can fill Media Bags with Activated Carbon and place them in your filter boxes to help clear the water if this happens to you. Also continue to use Nature’s Defense® and Muck Defense® to manage the muck left behind by decomposing leaves and fish waste. As water temperatures fall below 50 degrees Fahrenheit you can switch from Nature’s Defense® and Muck Defense® to Seasonal Defense®. Seasonal Defense® is a cool water natural bacteria that will continue the decomposition process throughout the fall and winter.

POND TALK: Do you fight to keep leaves out of your pond in the Fall? Has a pond net helped make your end of season ponding easier and more enjoyable?

Keep the leaves out!

Keeping Leaves Out of Your Water Garden with Pond Netting – Water Garden Q & A

Picture of Pond Netting Over a Water Garden.

Q: My water garden is placed by a tree and a ton of leaves collect in my water garden. It is a real pain cleaning the pond out at the end of the year. What can I do to prevent leaves from coming in? – Matt of Pennsylvania

A: This is definitely an issue that should be addressed. By preventing leaves from entering the pond, you will help reduce the “muck” build-up, allowing for less pond maintenance.

Using Pond Netting to Keep the Leaves Out: A simple solution to keeping leaves out is to place a pond netting over your water garden. Most pond netting will come with their own stakes that can be used to keep the net in place. This is by far the best and easiest way to accomplish this.