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Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Jeremy – Clinton, IA

A: It sure doesn’t take much for algae to grow out of control! Combine warm sunshine with some algae-loving nutrients and, before long, you’ll have a pond full of pea soup. When it’s thick and dense, those tiny plants can then suck all the oxygen from the water, leaving your fish gasping for air. Plus, it looks bad and can cause some major stink.

For the health of your fish and your lake, you must regain control. Here’s a two-pronged approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over.

TREAT THE GROWTH

First, you need to get rid of the algae blooms. For floating algae and chara that’s less than 3 feet deep, use Algae Defense®. The aquatic algaecide comes in a fast-acting liquid formula that can be directly applied to your lake with a pressurized sprayer. If you’re dealing with chara that’s deeper than 3 feet, use Cutrine®-Plus. Its granular formula sinks to the bottom of your lake and destroys the algae.

Once the algaecides start working to kill the blooms, don’t forget to remove dead algae from the pond with a tool like the Pond Rake. If you leave the dead foliage in the lake, will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

TREAT THE SOURCE

Now that you’ve got the algae under control, it’s time to get proactive and prevent its future growth. Begin by adding PondClear™ & MuckAway™. These products contain beneficial bacteria that gobble through excess nutrients like suspended organic waste and muck in your pond. The result: Clean and clear water with no noxious odors.

Next, shade the water with pond dye. By preventing the sun’s rays from penetrating the water, you’ll starve the algae of sunlight, which it needs to thrive.

ONE-STOP SHOPPING

Looking for an easy solution? Check out the ClearPAC® PLUS. This all-in-one algae destroyer contains everything you’ll need to kill the algae and prevent future growth. It contains algaecide, beneficial bacteria and pond dye to fight algae and suspended debris all season long.

Pond Talk: How do you prevent excess nutrients from entering your pond or lake?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS Combo

There is an Oil Slick Film Covering My Pond. How Do I Get Rid of It? – Pond & Lake Q & A

Algae, Duckweed, Watermeal & Pollen Identification

Q: There is a brown rust-like film/oil slick covering my pond. Do you have an idea what this might be and how to get rid of it? – Several Customers

A: There are several things this could be: Algae, duckweed, watermeal or pollen.

Determining if Algae is a Problem: Filamentous Algae will float around the pond’s edges in mats while Planktonic Algae will make the whole body of water to look like a “pea soup” green color. If this is the case, using Algae Defense® Algaecide will provide quick control. Follow up with PondClear™ for long-term clear water.

Determining if Duckweed or Watermeal is the Problem: Duckweed and Watermeal are very rapid growers and will cover an entire pond if they get out of control. Looking to the pictures to the left, you can see that Duckweed is a small plant the size of a pencil eraser, while Watermeal is about the size of the tip of a pencil. If you determine that you have Duckweed or Watermeal. Your only long-term option is Sonar™ A.S. for Duckweed and Clipper™ for Watermeal. If you only require short-term control (3-4 weeks) for an event or party Ultra PondWeed Defense®” may be used.

Determining if Pollen is the Problem: What may look like a greenish, brownish algae, may actually be pollen. Pollen may even cause an oil-slick or film on the surface of the pond. There is no magic product that will give you a quick fix. Many times a heavy rain will settle it to the bottom. In many cases if your pond receives good circulation from an aerator or fountain you will not see pollen becoming much of a problem.