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I need a net to protect my pond from leaves. Which one works the best? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I need a net to protect my pond from leaves. Which one works the best?

Q: I need a net to protect my pond from leaves. Which one works the best?

Richard – Davenport, IA

A: Colorful fall leaves are beautiful, but once they start falling, they can be a hassle—especially when you have a backyard pond. When they drop into the water, they turn it into leaf tea, add to the nutrient load, and as they break down, build up as muck on the pond bottom.

A net is your best option for protecting your pond from leaves. The type that will work best for you will depend on how you answer these questions:

  1. What types of leaves are you battling?
    If you have trees with small needles or leaves, like locust or pine, you’ll need a small mesh net — like Fine Mesh Netting — to catch all those tiny needles while still allowing sun to shine through. If you have larger leaves, like maple or oak, go with a stronger net that can handle their weight, like Premium Protective Netting.
  2. How concerned are you about your water garden’s aesthetic appeal?
    If you want something that will shelter your pond while allowing you to enjoy the view, check out some Economy Netting or Premium Pond Netting. They’re both easy to install, and they won’t block your view—but you will have to keep the leaves cleaned off to prevent the net from sagging. If you have a heavier leaf load, however, you might require a stronger net, like one of our Pond Cover Nets. Your view won’t be as naturalistic, but the net will protect your pond and reduce your extra fall chores.
  3. How long to you hope to use the net?
    Sometimes, a quick-fix, inexpensive solution is what you need. In that case, plastic Economy Netting designed for single-season use fits the bill. Cover your pond for the season, and when the snow starts falling, remove it and toss it. If you’re looking for something you can use season after season, however, consider Premium Protective Netting or netting with sturdy framework. It might cost more initially, but its durability will pay for itself in the long run.

With several different netting options there is one to fit just about any pond owner’s needs, choose one that’ll keep your pond leaf free.

Pond Talk: What kind of net do you have on your water garden?

Keep Troublesome Leaves Out - The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ Net Kit

 

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We’ve decided to shut down the pond this winter. Do we just need to take out the pump? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: We’ve decided to shut down the pond this winter. Do we just need to take out the pump?

Q: We’ve decided to shut down the pond this winter. Do we just need to take out the pump?

Tina – DuBois, PA

A:  Oh, if it were only that easy. Even though you plan to shut down the pond for the season, you still need to complete some winterizing chores. Put on your Aqua Gloves and hip waders. Here is your step-by-step guide for closing down shop and storing your pond equipment for the winter.

Step 1: Remove Pond Netting

Do you have a leaf-collecting net covering your pond? Once the colorful foliage has stopped falling, remove the net, shake off the leaves and store it until next fall. If you leave it on the pond, heavy snowfall and ice could collect on it and weigh it down—possibly endangering your fish.

Step 2: Disconnect Filters and Pumps, Lower Water Level

Next, protect your pumps, filters and hardware from the freezing temperatures. Disconnect the plumbing and drain the water from the tubing to prevent them from freezing, expanding and cracking. If your filtration system has built-in ultraviolet filter or if you have a UV clarifier, disconnect it and take it indoors to prevent ice damage. Remove your pump and store it in a bucket of water to keep the seals moist so they don’t dry out and crack. And lower your water level below the opening of skimmers to protect it from expanding and cracking during freezing temperatures.

Step 3: Clean Filters and Media

Natural bacteria that have been thriving in your pond will become dormant and die through the winter, so you can remove your filter media and store it indoors for safe keeping. Be sure to wash the pads or BioBalls with a strong stream of water while they’re still wet; it’s much easier to clean UVs and media when they’re wet versus trying to scrub off dried debris in the spring.

Step 4: Trim Back Aquatic Plants and Remove Excess Debris

Do you have plants in your pond? Tropical varieties—like tropical lilies—must be removed and stored inside if you hope to keep them thriving until spring. Check out this blog post that details how to remove and store them. Hardy varieties can stay in the pond; take some time to trim away dead or dying foliage after the first frost. While you’re at it, pull out your ClearVac pond vacuum and suck up as much detritus as possible. The less rotting debris in the pond, the more available oxygen for fish.

Step 5: Install De-Icer and Aeration
Your fish will take a winter nap through the cold season, but they’ll still need oxygen to survive. If you live in an area that freezes, be sure to install a de-icer, aeration or both (as we feature in our PondAir & Thermo-Pond De-Icer Combo) to help maintain a hole in the ice. That will allow the toxic gases to vent and oxygen to enter while circulating the water.

Step 6: Switch to Wheatgerm Fish Food
If you haven’t already switched to wheatgerm fish food, do so now. Our Spring and Fall Fish Food is easier for your finned pals to digest—which is what they need when temperatures start to fall. As the water reaches 40 to 50 degrees F, slow down and stop feeding them for winter. Remember that with no filtration system running, any waste they produce won’t be sufficiently removed.

Step 7: Add Seasonal Defense
Finally, if temperatures still permit, continue to add natural bacteria designed for cooler temperatures, like Seasonal Defense. The little microbes will continue to break down organic waste that wasn’t easily cleaned from the pond.

As you prepare to shut your pond down for the winter, take time to check off these chores. It’ll make next year’s spring pond season one to look forward to!

Pond Talk: Do you have a dedicated spot in your garage or basement for pond supplies and equipment?

Make Your Fall Cleanout Quick & Easy - The Pond Guy(r) ClearVac(rm) Pond Vacuum

I need a net to protect my pond from leaves. Which one works the best? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: I need a net to protect my pond from leaves. Which one works the best?

Q: I need a net to protect my pond from leaves. Which one works the best?

Richard – Davenport, IA

A:  Colorful fall leaves are beautiful, but once they start falling, they can be a hassle—especially when you have a backyard pond. When they drop into the water, they turn it into leaf tea, add to the nutrient load, and as they break down, build up as muck on the pond bottom.

A net is your best option for protecting your pond from leaves. The type that will work best for you will depend on how you answer these questions:

  1. What types of leaves are you battling?
    If you have trees with small needles or leaves, like locust or pine, you’ll need a small mesh net — like Fine Mesh Netting — to catch all those tiny needles while still allowing sun to shine through. If you have larger leaves, like maple or oak, go with a stronger net that can handle their weight, like Premium Protective Netting.
  2. How concerned are you about your water garden’s aesthetic appeal?
    If you want something that will shelter your pond while allowing you to enjoy the view, check out some Economy Netting or Premium Pond Netting. They’re both easy to install, and they won’t block your view—but you will have to keep the leaves cleaned off to prevent the net from sagging. If you have a heavier leaf load, however, you might require a stronger net, like one of our Pond Cover Nets. Your view won’t be as naturalistic, but the net will protect your pond and reduce your extra fall chores.
  3. How long to you hope to use the net?
    Sometimes, a quick-fix, inexpensive solution is what you need. In that case, plastic Economy Netting designed for single-season use fits the bill. Cover your pond for the season, and when the snow starts falling, remove it and toss it. If you’re looking for something you can use season after season, however, consider Premium Protective Netting or netting with sturdy framework. It might cost more initially, but its durability will pay for itself in the long run.

With several different netting options there is one to fit just about any pond owner’s needs, choose one that’ll keep your pond leaf free.

Pond Talk: What kind of net do you have on your water garden?

Keep Troublesome Leaves Out - The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ Net Kit

My water is brown. Should I use carbon and, if so, what is the best way to apply it? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: My water is brown. Should I use carbon and, if so, what is the best way to apply it?

Q: My water is brown. Should I use carbon and, if so, what is the best way to apply it?

Lisa – Gresham, OR

A:  Brown water can destroy a beautiful landscape.

That tea-colored water is typically caused by one of two things: tannins being released by dead leaves, similar to what happens when you steep your chamomile tea; or an optical illusion caused by reflected decomposing pond debris. The two causes have two different solutions. Here’s what we recommend.

Inspect Water

First, take a closer look at the water. Dip a clear glass in the water and hold it up to the light. If the water looks discolored, you’ve got tannin tea; if it’s clear, you’re dealing with a mucky pond.

Clearing Tannin Tea

Carbon is your solution for clearing brown water. Pond Logic® Activated Carbon comes with a fine-mesh bag, which holds the carbon pellets when they’re submerged. It’s easy to use:

  1. Pour the recommended amount of pellets into the bag. A 500-gallon pond, for example, requires 2 to 3 pounds while a 1,000-gallon pond requires 4 to 6 pounds.
  2. Place the bag in a high water-flow area, like your skimmer or waterfall, so as much water as possible flows through the carbon.
  3. Wait for the carbon to do its job! Once the discoloration has disappeared, you can remove the carbon and discard it.

Cleaning Up the Muck

If you have a mucky pond, natural beneficial bacteria and some elbow grease will make your water sparkle again.

  1. Pond Logic® Season Defense®, which works well in cooler fall weather, contains microorganisms that help break down the muck and accumulated debris at the bottom of your pond.
  2. Giving your pond a good old-fashioned cleaning can help, too. Removing the muck and decomposing organics with a pond vacuum or net will give those bacteria a chance to focus on breaking down the small stuff.

Pond Talk: How have you removed brown water from your pond?

Safely Clear Tea Colored Water - Pond Logic® Activated Carbon

The leaves are starting to change color here. What are my different pond netting options?| Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: The leaves are starting to change color here. What are my different pond netting options?

Q: The leaves are starting to change color here. What are my different pond netting options?

Ronny – Duluth, MN

A: The leaves may be changing color, but it’s not too soon to start thinking about how you’ll prevent those colorful autumn reminders from floating into your pond. Here are four popular pond-netting options outlined below.

PondShelter™ Cover Net

Have uneven ground around your pond? The PondShelter™ Cover Net offers the flexibility to provide pond coverage for irregular landscapes, thanks to its fully adjustable aluminum frame. Each of its four legs can be extended and locked to length, and they’re hinged to the center hub to adjust net pitch and discourage debris accumulation. In addition, the PondShelter™ includes a 16-foot-by-11-foot swath of 1/4-inch black mesh netting and 30 metal stakes to keep the structure securely in place.

Pond Protector

Designed for use around a pond built on level ground, the Pond & Water Garden Protector Net Kit keeps both leaves and predators out of your water garden. The structure’s domed shape allows debris to simply fall off while not smashing taller pond plants beneath the net. The 1/2-inch mesh net allows for maximum sunlight and optimum plant ventilation.

Premium Protective Pond Netting

If you’re looking for a net to blend in with your pond while keeping it debris-free, check out the Premium Protective Pond Netting. The flexible 5/8-inch black mesh netting is made from woven nylon for tremendous strength and durability that will last for many seasons. Stakes are included to secure your net over your pond and to the landscape.

Fine Mesh Pond Netting

If your pond tends to collect fine debris like pine needles, the Fine Mesh Pond Netting is the cover for you. Made with clear, heavy-duty 1/8-inch mesh in a variety of sizes to fit most ponds, the netting will keep your water garden protected from small, stubborn debris like pine needles while still allowing for sunlight penetration and aesthetic enjoyment. It comes with plastic stakes to keep it in place.

Remember that pond nets are intended to be used spring, summer and autumn – so be sure to remove it before heavy snow falls in the winter!

Pond Talk: How are you prepping your pond and backyard for the cooler weather?

Keep Leaves and Predators Out- The Pond Guy(r) PondShelter(t) Cover Net

We’re expecting a big snow storm. Can I keep the net on my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: We’re expecting a big snow storm. Can I keep the net on my pond?

Q: We’re expecting a big snow storm. Can I keep the net on my pond?

Dale – Rapid City, SD

A: If Jack Frost is blowing in a doozy of a blizzard, you should definitely take the net off your pond. As they accumulate, snow and ice can get heavy enough to collapse the net into your water feature—and that could endanger your dormant fish if they get tangled in the sunken net.

Before the storm passes through, remove your net and store it in your garage or shed, and add a K&H™ Perfect Climate™ De-Icer to your pond. The thermostatically controlled unit, which works above or below the water surface, will melt ice that forms around it, keeping a small hole open for gas exchange.

What About Debris?

If you’re worried about leaves and other organic material landing in your pond, keep your 3-in-1 Pond Tool handy and remove anything that blows in during the storm. The telescoping aluminum handle, which extends 5 feet, will allow you to easily remove that muck-causing debris.

What About Predators?

If you’re concerned that raccoons, blue herons or other predators will battle the snowy elements to grab a sushi dinner from your pond, submerge some Nycon Koi Kastle Fish Shelters in your pond. These molded black plastic or fiberglass mesh shelters, which come in multiple sizes including lengths of 7 ½, 13, 18, 21½ and 24 inches, provide safe refuge for your koi and other fish. Simply position them in the deepest areas of your pond.

Depending on where you live, you can re-install your net again once the snow storm blows by. But if you expect a prolonged period of snow and ice, leave the net off for the season. Good luck, and stay warm and dry!

Pond Talk: What pond toys do you hope Santa brings for you this holiday season?

Vent Harmful Gases All Winter Long - K&H(tm) Perfect Climate(tm) De-Icer

Our nights have been chilly, when should I start using Seasonal Defense? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Our nights have been chilly, when should I start using Seasonal Defense?

Q: Our nights have been chilly, when should I start using Seasonal Defense?

Liz – Schenevus, NY

A: Pond Logic® Seasonal Defense® contains aerobic bacteria that’s specially designed for cooler water. When used at this time of year, the waste-gobbling microorganisms break down dead foliage, fish waste and other sediment that have accumulated over the summer and fall. Seasonal Defense® gives you one last opportunity to clean up the muck before winter.

Switch at 50°F
Plan to switch to Seasonal Defense® once water temperatures dip below 50° Fahrenheit. Once the water falls to 40°F, however, discontinue using it until the spring after the spring ice melt, when the water temperature climbs back up to 40°F.

Spread the Love
Don’t just pile the Seasonal Defense® packets in one place. Disburse the packets around your pond to ensure even spread of the beneficial bacteria and breakdown of accumulated muck. Add some to the filter to concentrate and accelerate new bacteria growth on the filter media. Distribute them evenly—but, of course, follow the package recommendations for dosage rates.

Supplement Seasonal Defense®
To help out the Seasonal Defense®, make sure you keep up on your fall chores. Regularly check and clean out your skimmer basket, and remove any leaves or large pieces of debris that blow into the pond. This will encourage the bacteria to focus their energy on the fine organic material and muck.

And if you don’t have one in place already, install some Pond Netting or a PondShelter™ to prevent leaves from falling into your water garden in the first place. This preventive maintenance step will save you time—and make Seasonal Defense®’s job easier.

Pond Talk: How are water temperatures in your neck of the woods? Is winter coming early this year?

Accelerate Fall Debris Decomposition - Pond Logic(r) Seasonal Defense(r)