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I want to put in a pond. How do I know what type of filter system I need? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: I want to put in a pond. How do I know what type of filter system I need?

Q: I want to put in a pond. How do I know what type of filter system I need?

Barb – Denton, NE

A: Choosing the right filter for your water feature can be a daunting task – particularly if you are new to the pond-keeping hobby. With all the designs and functions available out there, where do you start?

Your first step is to consider your pond’s location and its use. As you’re in the pre-planning stages, where do you plan on putting it, and what will you use it for? Will your pond be situated in full sun, or will it be shaded by a tree that drops leaves every fall? Will you have a small pond with a few small goldfish or a larger pond teeming with koi?

Once you’ve come up with a place and a plan, then you can start narrowing down the type of filtration system (or systems) that will work best for your pond.

External Pressurized Filter
Perfect for: Ponds in full sun
External pressurized filters are designed for small- to medium-sized ponds that are in full sun. Because all that sunshine encourages algae blooms and green water, these filters include biological, mechanical and ultraviolet filtration – a three-pronged attack that will keep your water crystal clear. Some also include a backflush option, which makes it easy to clean without having to remove your filter media. It’s one of the easiest filters to add to an existing pond because the plumbing doesn’t need to be run through the liner.

Waterfall Filters
Perfect for: Large ponds with many fish 
Designed for small, medium or large ponds, waterfall filters provide a big waterfall display while biologically filtering the water. The pond water flows up through the filter media, where the beneficial bacteria clean the water, then spills out to create an elegant water display. They’re great for new ponds and easy to install in existing ponds and water gardens. They don’t offer the UV filtration, but they typically filter more water, handle larger pumps and won’t plug up as easily.

Pond Skimmers
Perfect for: Ponds that get a lot of leaves
Providing mechanical filtration, pond skimmers do an excellent job filtering ponds that receive a lot of leaves and floating debris. They contain a filter mat and debris net to catch leaves before they settle on the bottom of your pond, and they house your pump, giving you easy access to it for upkeep and maintenance. Because pond skimmers only provide mechanical filtration, be sure to pair it up with a waterfall filter.

Submersible In-Pond Filters
Perfect for: Small ponds with a few small fish
These all-in-one submersible in-pond filters are one of the easiest systems to add to an existing pond, as all the plumbing is conveniently contained right in the unit. Ideal for small ponds (up to 1,200 gallons) with just a few fish, these filtration systems can be combined with a fountain or used with a small waterfall. They provide mechanical and biological filtration and include a powerful UV clarifier to eliminate discolored water.

Whichever filtration system you choose, make sure it’s sized right for your pond – you don’t want to under-filter your new water feature! If you have questions about filter types and sizes, just talk to one of our experts. We’re happy to help!

Pond Talk: What advice about filtration systems would you give to this new pond owner?

Make Pond Water Crystal Clear - The Pond Guy® ClearSolution™

I’ve used lava rock in my filter for years. Are bioballs really that much better? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: I’ve used lava rock in my filter for years. Are bioballs really that much better?

Q: I’ve used lava rock in my filter for years. Are bioballs really that much better?

Dana – Altadena, CA

A: The media you use in your filtration system matters. Just think about its purpose: To house billions of beneficial bacteria and other microorganisms that keep your pond alive, crystal clear and algae-free. Thanks to their ample surface area, both lava rock and bioballs will work, but bioballs have some benefits over the rock. Read on to learn more.

Lava Rock’s Limitations

Lava rock – that igneous rock that’s formed as an erupting volcano’s molten lava cools and hardens – is very porous. When chunks of it live in your filtration system, you’re providing a lot of surface area for those beneficial bacteria to colonize and grow. That’s what makes it such a great filter media.

It does, however, have its drawbacks.

  • Clogged Holes: Over time, the porous rock can become easily clogged with muck and debris. Once the holes and pockets are clogged, they can become very difficult to clean out – which ultimately creates less overall surface area.
  • Hard Water: Lava rock naturally contains a variety of minerals, including iron and magnesium, that could affect your water’s pH, making it harder. Hard water could make it more difficult to treat algae that forms.
  • It’s Heavy!: They may be porous chunks of rock, but hefting bags of it takes some strength – particularly when its wet and full of gunk.

Benefits of BioBalls

Bioballs, like The Pond Guy® BioBalls™ filter media, are plastic spheres made up of dozens of thin rods that provide plenty of surface area for beneficial bacteria to thrive. Two hundred of the bioballs in a mesh bag will filter about 1,000 gallons of water in a pond with minimal fish.

Compared to lava rock, bioballs have some definite benefits.

  • Easy to Clean: Bioballs can also become clogged, by they’re easy to clean. Just rinse them off with water from your pond and you’ll be good to go.
  • Indefinite Lifetime: Because they’re made from long-lasting material, bioballs will not degrade and will function equally well year after year.
  • Shape Shifters: The bioballs’ round shape allows them to more easily conform to any filter, no matter its shape.
  • Lightweight, Easy to Handle: Each one of these tiny, 1 1/2-inch plastic spheres weighs a scant 0.3 ounces; 200 of them weigh a whopping 3 1/2 pounds. They’re easy to deposit and remove from your filter thanks to a mesh filter bag.

Consider making the switch from lava rock to bioballs. You’ll see better results and you’ll need to do less maintenance. What’s better than that?

Pond Talk: Why do you prefer bioballs over lava rock?

Lightweight & Easy to Clean - The Pond Guy® BioBalls™

Should I use just one type of filter media or are multiple types better? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Should I use just one type of filter media or are multiple types better?

Q: Should I use just one type of filter media or are multiple types better?

Christine – Mt. Clemens, MI

A: Filter media—or the stuff in your filter that holds beneficial bacteria—come in a range of shapes, sizes and densities. Some are plastic balls; some are fibrous mats and blocks; some are plastic spiral-shaped things that more resemble fusilli than pond products. With all the different types, it’s tough to decide which is best.

Well, we’ll make it easy for you: Try a little of each type. Just like plants, different filtration media provide different amounts of water filtration, so we recommend a healthy mix of media pads, like Matala® Filter Media Pads, and Filter Media Pads pre-cut and by-the-foot; ridged plastic balls, like The Pond Guy® BioBalls™; and curly plastic strips, like Bacti-Twist® Biological/Mechanical Filter Media.

When choosing the filter media, regardless of type, look for these defining characteristics:

  • Durability: Your media should be able to withstand wear and tear. The Pond Guy® BioBalls™ are more durable and longer lasting compared to similar products.
  • Density: Your media should be the right density for your specific needs. Matala® Filter Media Pads come in 4 densities to suit your particular pond.
  • Surface area: Your media should also have a lot of surface area, which will result in more places for beneficial bacteria to grow.

Your filter media’s density and surface area are particularly important because they determine how much beneficial bacteria grows and the rate at which water flows through the material. Dense material allows for more bacteria colonization, while less-dense material allows for more water flow. By using all different types of filter media, you’re encouraging optimal biological and mechanical filtration—and that’s always a good thing in an enclosed system.

Already have filter media in your system? You may be able to use it for another season or two, but first give it a visual inspection. Is it beginning to wear on the edges? Has it compacted over the last few seasons? Worn or compressed material should be replaced to give your pond top-quality filtration, but fresh, fluffy material can be reused.

Pond Talk: What’s your preferred filter media type—and why?

Keep Your Water Crystal Clear - Matala® Filter Media Pads

What is the difference between a waterfall filter and a pressurized filter? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

What is the difference between a waterfall filter and a pressurized filter?

Q: What is the difference between a waterfall filter and a pressurized filter?

Ryan – Houston, TX

A: Your pond or water garden needs some kind of biological filtration system to keep the water crystal clear. In general, you’ll find two basic types: a waterfall filter and a pressurized filter. Both are comparably priced and work well at cleaning the water and removing suspended particles, but there are some distinct differences.

Waterfall Filter

Typically installed during pond construction and connected to the liner, a waterfall filter, like the PondBuilder™ Crystal Falls Waterfall Filter, is buried in the ground at the top of your waterfall. This allows a place for water to pool, which then creates a smooth, even flow as the water pours down into the pond.

The filter box itself houses the biological filtration media, like BioBalls™ and filter media pads, that are covered with nitrogen- and ammonia-eating beneficial bacteria. Overall, it’s a simple, easy-to-maintain system that can handle high volumes of water.

Pressurized Filter

Unlike the waterfall filter, a pressurized filter, like The Pond Guy® AllClear™ Pressurized UV Filter, can be positioned anywhere outside the pond. The unit holds water pressure, so the filtered water can be routed back to the pond or up to a waterfall, creating a flowing waterfall effect without taking up space at the top of the falls.

As with the waterfall filter, the filter box itself holds the biological filtration media, but it can also house an ultraviolet sterilizer and may even be configured to backflush for ultra-easy maintenance. Another benefit: The pressurized filter is an easy addition to an already-existing pond that needs filtration (or an upgrade).

Purchase Options

When deciding whether to invest in a waterfall filter or a pressurized filter, ask yourself these questions:

  • Given your current pond situation, which one is easier for you to install?
  • What type of filter can accommodate the intended water flow? A waterfall filter can generally handle more water flow than the pressurized model.
  • Do you wish to also use an ultraviolet sterilizer? If so, consider a pressurized filter, like the AllClear™, that includes a built in UV unit.

Pond Talk: What kind of filter do you have in your pond?

The Pond Guy® AllClear™ Pressurized Filters - 3 Types of Filtration, 1 Powerful Unit


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