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I think I have grass growing in my pond. Could it be Sago pondweed? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I think I have grass growing in my pond. Could it be Sago pondweed?

Q: I think I have grass growing in my pond. Could it be Sago pondweed?

Lewie- Gwinner, ND

A: Sago pondweed, or Potamogeton pectinatus, is a distinctive aquatic plant that kind of does resemble grass.

Sago is a perennial that grows from thickly matted rhizomes. It has no floating leaves, but it has thin, long and branching stems with tapering, filament-like leaves that are 1/16 of an inch wide and 2 to 12 inches in length. The leaves grow in thick layers and originate from a sheath. The plants produce a nut-like fruit that’s 1/8 to 1/4 inch long and 1/10 to 1/8 inch wide.

Pondweed Pros and Cons
The Sago pondweed, like other aquatic plants, provides habitat for many below- and above-the-surface critters. From the birds that eat the plant’s fruit and tubers to the fish that find food and safety in their stems, the pondweed has lots of fans. Even fungi and beneficial bacteria benefit from it – as the plant decomposes, the microorganisms feed on the detritus.

But Sago also has its drawbacks. Plants rapidly spread between bodies of water. In a small water body or backyard pond, unchecked Sago can become a nuisance. And when you do mechanically remove it, remaining plant fragments, including leaves and roots, can sprout new growth.

Controlling Sago
If you suspect Sago in your pond, you have several management options. Here’s what we recommend to help you get the weed under control.

  1. Herbicides: To rid your pond or lake of Sago, an herbicide will be necessary.
    • Sonar™ A.S. is a season-long herbicide. One treatment wipes out Sago and many other common floating and submerged pond weeds for the entire season.
    • Ultra PondWeed Defense® is a broad-spectrum herbicide that will quickly kill Sago. It doesn’t stay in the water body, however, so multiple treatments may be necessary.
    • Clipper™ is a fast and selective herbicide that controls tough invasive and nuisance floating and submerged aquatic plants. It comes in a fine wettable powder to spray weeds.
  2. Mechanical Removal: Once it has turned brown and died, Sago pondweed can be removed by raking it with a Weed Raker™ – but remember that the plant will sprout and reestablish from any remaining roots, seeds and foliage fragments.
  3. Pond Dye: Non-toxic dyes, like Pond Logic® Pond Dye, reduce and prevent Sago pondweed growth by limiting sunlight penetration.
  4. Aeration and Beneficial Bacteria: Aerating your pond or lake with an Airmax® Aeration System can help, too – particularly if you’re using the beneficial bacteria found in PondClear™ . The extra oxygen in the water fuels the tiny bacteria as they break down nutrients that fertilize the Sago.

Pond Talk: Have you ever had Sago pondweed in your pond or lake? How did you get it under control?

Broad Spectrum Control - Pond Logic(r) Ultra PondWeed Defense (r)

I think I have duckweed or watermeal. How do I know? And how do I treat it? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I think I have duckweed or watermeal. How do I know? And how do I treat it?

Q: I think I have duckweed or watermeal. How do I know? And how do I treat it?

Richard – Fishers, IN

A: Duckweed and watermeal are both pond pests. Dense colonies of these prolific plants can completely cover the surface of a lake or fish pond, causing dissolved oxygen depletions and fish kills. These tiny invaders need to be managed before they take over.

But before you control them, you need to get to know them. Let’s meet these troublemakers.

Watermeal

The smallest seed-bearing plants in the world, watermeal is a very tiny (less than 1 millimeter) light green free-floating rootless plant that resembles green cornmeal. They prefer quiet water that’s undisturbed by waves, and they’re often associated with colonies of duckweed and mosquito fern (azzola). Unchecked, these plants can be aggressive invaders.

Duckweed

Duckweed is another very small light green free-floating plant, but unlike watermeal, duckweed has a single root and one to three leaves, or fronds, that measure 1/16- to 1/8-inch long. Like watermeal, duckweed tends to grow in dense colonies in quiet water that’s undisturbed by wave action. Duckweed colonies provide habitat for micro invertebrates, but if it completely covers the surface of a pond for an extended period, it will cause oxygen depletions. As its name implies, duckweed is often gobbled by ducks, which also transport it to other bodies of water but you cannot count them for keeping the weed in control.

Stop the Invasion!

To control these aquatic bad guys, you’ll need a herbicide. Clipper™ and Ultra PondWeed Defense® are both selective plant killers that will attack watermeal and duckweed. They’re a short-term solution for both—be sure to apply as directed.

For long-term control of duckweed, you’ll need something a bit stronger. We recommend Sonar™ A.S.. It’s formulated to control stubborn aquatic weeds all season long. Don’t forget to add pond dye, it protects the Sonar™ A.S. from being quickly degraded by the sun.

Pond Talk: Tell us about your experiences with duckweed and watermeal. Do you have any additional management tips to share?

Deliver Fast & Selective Control Of Weeds - Valent® Clipper™ Aquatic Herbicide

Controlling Duckweed & Watermeal – Pond & Lake Q & A

Q: I think I have duckweed and watermeal. It’s taking over my pond! I can’t seem to get ahead of it! What do I do?
- Several Customers

Picture of DuckweedA: Duckweed and watermeal are very prolific growers and can cover a pond before you know it. When covering a pond it can look like algae, but up close you can see it’s not (see pictures on the left). You can try to rake the duckweed and watermeal off the pond’s surface but more will be back within the week. The absolute best way to get rid of duckweed is to use a product called Sonar™ A.S.. The best way to get rid of watermeal is to use a product called Clipper™. Sonar™ A.S. works by inhibiting the weed’s ability to produce carotene. Without this ability, chlorophyll is rapidly degraded by sunlight and the weeds die. The only water use restriction is a 30 day irrigation restriction.

Both Sonar™ A.S. and Clipper™ will also get rid of many other submerged weeds in the pond and will produce season-long results in as little as 30-45 days.

Picture of WatermealFor more information on these herbicides and the aquatic weeds they will control, click here.

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