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When Should I Start Treating Floating Algae In My Pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

When Should I Start Treating Floating Algae In My Pond?

When Should I Start Treating Floating Algae In My Pond?

Jacquelyn - Pottsville, PA

 

Spring is just around the corner and in some areas, algae is already growing. But the question we hear quite often around this time is, “When can I start?” or, “Is it too early to treat?” The answer really depends on what the weather is like at your pond.

Getting a jump start on algae early in the season can help control growth as the season progresses. Fortunately, treating floating algae and preventing its build up is rather easy and really only one factor may stop you…temperature.

Is your pond above or below 50 degrees? This is important because aquatic algicides become less effective when temperatures fall below 50° Fahrenheit. However, understand that treatments will still work, just not as well. If you have an abundance of algae growing when the water temperatures are below 50° Fahrenheit, it’s worth a quick treatment to get it under control early. If the water temperature is too low, wait to use any treatment and instead use a lake rake to remove excessive algae if you are not able to chemically treat it. Another up-and-coming product that works very well to skim floating debris is the PondSkim™ Pond Deskuzzer. The PondSkim™ is a tool that contains a float and debris catcher. Simply drag across the surface of the water to collect debris.

If you have algae already growing in your pond we suggest that you get a jump start on it and you’ll be happy you did.

Airmax Pond & Beach Rake

How often do I need to replace the air filter on my (Airmax) Aeration system? | Pond & Lakes Q&A

How often do I need to replace the air filter on my (Airmax) Aeration system?

How often do I need to replace the air filter on my (Airmax) Aeration system?
Mike – Flat Rock, MI

First, for people strapped for time, we’ll go with the short answer. Under ordinary circumstances, we recommend filter replacements every six months. If you live in a dry, dusty environment, it’s best to change the filter every three to four months. For Airmax Filters, we strongly recommend Airmax Silent Air Black Air Filters (Complete), and Airmax Silent Air Replacement Air Filter Elements for routine replacement.

Now, for those who want the rest of the story, here’s the long answer, which, incidentally, also makes for fascinating cocktail party conversation. To make sense of our recommended filter replacement schedule, it’s important to understand why it’s even necessary at all.

First and foremost, regular filter changes will prevent the premature failure of your filter compressor pump. As it turns out, filter pumps are designed to perform best with clean filters. When filters become clogged, the compressor is forced to work harder. When it works harder, its wear parts are subject to greater wear and tear. And if a filter is left unchanged for too long, an overworked pump is likely to fail. Accordingly, given the cost of replacing a pump, regular filter changes are a much more economical alternative.

In addition to the stress they place on pumps, dirty filters won’t allow the compressor to do the job they’re intended to do, circulate pond water. As a result, the entire pond ecosystem feels the effects. With regular filter changes, pond water is safer for fish and plants, and clearer and more enjoyable for the people who care for them.

Occasionally, our customers ask whether filters can be cleaned and reused. While it seems like a logical option, filters can’t be effectively cleaned – and their performance is significantly compromised. We also strongly discourage the installation of a wet element in a filter system, given the potential to further stress the pump and to unintentionally introduce foreign contaminants into the pond.

As an economical alternative to filter cleaning, we recommend the use of Airmax Silent Air Replacement Air Filter Elements, rather than installing a complete filter unit. The savings are significant – and the filter system will be ready to perform flawlessly for another three to six months.

Happy aerating.

Pond Talk: Do you notice the performance of your aeration system begin to decline as the filter becomes clogged?

Airmax SilentAir Complete Air Filter

What is the difference between Pond Dye and Pond Dye Plus? | Pond & Lakes Q & A

What is the difference between Pond Dye and Pond Dye Plus?

What is the difference between Pond Dye and Pond Dye Plus?
Emma – Racine, WI

Adding pond dye to your pond maintenance regimen is a great way to keep your pond looking great all year long. The additional shade gives your pond the unique color of your choosing whether it be a decorative blue tint or a mirror like reflective surface while discouraging unwanted plant and weed growth. Pond Logic makes a new dye called Pond Logic Pond Dye Plus leaving pond owners everywhere wondering what all the “Plus” is about.

Aquatic weeds and algae utilize decomposing organic materials like waste, runoff, dead leaves or plant decay along with sunlight as fuel to grow and overtake your pond. Pond Logic Pond Dye Plus combines the Nature’s Blue or Twilight Blue Pond Dye you’ve grown to love with their powerful PondClear Liquid Bacteria.

The bacteria added to Pond Dye Plus actually digest the mucky organic debris that has built up in your pond. This not only discourages future weed growth but also improves water clarity by removing organic floating debris that cloud up your water. By combining both dye and bacteria in one product you can effectively reduce the time you spend treating your pond, and spend more time enjoying it. PondClear is a natural product and is safe for your fish, pets, birds, wildlife, and of course yourself. The beneficial bacteria in Pond Dye Plus is most effective when your pond can maintain a water temperature of around 50 degrees or higher. If it is still a bit chilly where you live, continue to use just your Pond Dye until later in the season.

If you are new to beneficial bacteria treatments or your pond needs a little help breaking down excessive organic debris, making the upgrade to Pond Logic Pond Dye Plus is a logical choice. If your muck situation is getting entirely out of hand or you are not a fan of using dye in your pond, Pond Logic also offers bacteria treatments without the dye in the form of Pond Logic PondClear and MuckAway.

Pond Talk: Have you tried Pond Dye Plus yet? Share your experience!

Year long pond protection!

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