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How do I know which aeration system is right for my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

How do I know which aeration system is right for my pond?

Q: How do I know which aeration system is right for my pond?

Tim – Warren, OH

A: Yes, aeration systems can be confusing. If you’re not used to working with calculations that involve a lake’s surface area, depth and shape, deciding which system fits your fish pond can be a complicated matter.

Well get out your tape measure and calculator, because we’ve made the process easy. Here’s what you need to know to pick the right aeration system for your needs.

Pond Size

First, you’ll need to determine the size of your pond or lake so you can select a powerful enough aeration system to handle it. To calculate its surface area, measure the length and the width, multiply them, and then divide that number by 43,560. Each aeration system lists the pond surface area that it can handle on the package for easy selection.

Pond Depth

Once you know your pond or lake’s surface area, you then need to figure in its depth. It plays an important role in the system compressor’s efficiency and aeration area—the deeper the pond, the more area one diffuser can handle; the shallower the pond, the less area it can handle.

Look for the system that will handle the surface area at the depth of your pond. Ponds less than 6 feet deep will benefit from an efficient shallow water system, like the Airmax® Shallow Water Aeration System. It allows for multiple aeration plates that can be spread across the pond for more efficient aeration where the lack of depth reduces the area a diffuser can handle.

Pond Shape

Finally, take a look at your pond’s shape. If you have a round pond, it’s relatively easy to fit an aeration system, like the Airmax® Deep Water Aeration System, based simply on its size and depth. If you have a long, narrow pond or one with odd shapes or coves, however, you may require additional diffusers for optimum circulation.

Still having a problem figuring out the aeration puzzle? Let us help! We can look up your pond via satellite and size the aeration system for you along with a layout for diffuser placement. Just give us a call or shoot us an email!

Pond Talk: Do you remember the first aeration system you installed in your lake? How was it different from the one you use today?

Breathe Some Life Into Your Pond - Airmax® Shallow Water Aeration Systems

I Want To Build My Own Pond. How Do I Go About Planning It Out? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

I Want To Build My Own Pond. How Do I Go About Planning It Out?

William – Scottsboro, AL

There are a number of considerations that need to be made when planning for a large pond. These basic and important tips will help make sure you are on the right track and well prepared for constructing and maintaining the large pond that’s right for you.

Purpose– What do you want to use your pond for? If for fishing, plan for depth and habitat. If for swimming, consider implementing a shallow beach and gradual slopes.

Shape – What do you want your pond to look like? Ponds with uniform shape are often easier to care for as they typically posses less shoreline and can be circulated with less obstruction.

Size – How big do your want your pond to be? The size of your yard can play a large role in determining pond size. Purpose is an equally important factor; do you want to use your pond for swimming and skating?

Surroundings – What will be around your pond? Avoid areas that introduce excessive amounts of debris. Runoff and foliage are two common contributors to pond muck. Berm the edges of your pond to prevent runoff and distance trees away from the shoreline.

Depth – How deep should your pond be? A typical depth for a large pond is six to eight feet, though if you plan on stocking specific fish such as walleye you will want to increase the depth to provide adequate habitat.

Airmax® Informational DVD

Should I use a heater or aerator in my water garden? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

When should I remove the fountain from my pond?

Should I use a heater or aerator in my water garden?
Lindsay – Pittsfield, ME

So you already know that it is important to keep a hole open in the ice that forms over your water garden during the winter months. This provides an outlet for harmful gases and an inlet for new oxygen-rich air. The question now is which device do you choose to get the job done. The good news is if you have already made your purchase for the season either one will perform excellently. Both a heater and aerator will maintain a hole in the ice but unlike a pond heater, this is only one of many tasks an aeration system performs for your water garden.

When we talk about pond heaters we are referencing units like the Thermo-Pond De-Icer 3.0 which does not heat the water in the pond but instead keeps a ring of water open allowing gas to escape through the vent in the top of the unit. Since most ponds deeper than 18” do not freeze solid this is all that is needed to allow oxygen exchange while the fish are dormant. When running a pond heater periodically check in on the pond to make sure ice does not form over the vent hole. To reduce electrical expense most pond heaters are thermostatically controlled to run only during a given temperature range, but they are measuring water temperature instead of air temperature. This means it is unlikely that the water temperature will raise enough to ever shut off the heater. To save some extra money on energy bills use a Thermo Cube® in tandem with your pond heater as it will determine when your pond heater should run based on the ambient air temperature.

Aeration keeps a hole in the ice during the winter by producing bubbles and water motion to slow the ice from forming. This allows for the same gas exchange created by a pond heater, however your Aeration System will circulate the entire pond volume and infuse it with dissolved oxygen making it more efficient at oxygen/gas transfer. People will sometimes run pumps beneath the ice trying to create this same effect but it is the tiny air bubbles that boost dissolved oxygen levels and create the friction that prevents ice from forming. Your pond benefits from aeration year round making an aeration system a helpful and highly functional tool regardless of the season. The installation process is simple and straightforward and aeration systems are available in various sizes and shapes allowing you to select a system that best fits your pond. When selecting a system make sure you purchase a unit that is rated for your ponds volume in order to provide enough outlet for proper gas exchange.

The performance of both pond heaters and aeration systems vary depending on how cold it gets in your area. Even when vented properly, layers of ice appear may over when temperatures dip well below freezing. If this only occurs temporarily, and is short in duration while the coldest temperatures and wind are present, there should not be any cause for concern, as a calm or sunny day will give the pond the help it needs to re-open the hole in the ice. If it is necessary to manually reopen the air vent do not try to break through it by hitting it with hammers or heavy objects as this creates vibrations that can harm your fish. If necessary pour a bucket of warm water over the vent hole to melt it back open.

Whichever unit you choose to use will perform to keep your fish safe for the winter months and ensure that they will be healthy, happy and ready to go in the spring.

POND TALK: Which type of system have you found to work better in your pond? Do you still notice some ice formation?

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