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Can I leave netting over my pond during the winter months? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Can I leave netting over my pond during the winter months?

Q: Can I leave netting over my pond during the winter months?

Robert – Sherrard, IL

A: I don’t know about you, but the thought of one or two leaves drifting into my pristine pond after a thorough fall clean-out sends shivers down my spine—which is why, like many hobbyists, I cover my water garden with pond netting, like The Pond Guy® Premium Pond Netting, in the fall and early winter.

Even though netting makes the water feature look less than attractive, particularly during the holiday season when the yard sparkles with twinkling lights, it keeps it clean and debris-free. Not only that, but it also protects the fish from flying and four-legged predators looking for a tasty winter meal.

So why not leave the pond netting on all winter long?

In some locations, you can. If you live in a climate with mild temperatures, and minimal snow and freezing, you can leave the netting on all year-long, provided you check it regularly and remove any accumulated material.

In other locations, like those that receive heavy snowfall or freezing rain, a better place for the pond netting during the winter is in the garage. The weighty precipitation could put way too much pressure on your net, stretching it out of shape or causing it to become brittle and break.

So before the big storms start rolling through, remove your pond netting and pack it up for the season. But to keep those straggling leaves and other annoying debris out of your pond, have a handheld pond net, like The Pond Guy® 2-in-1 Heavy Duty Combo Net, readily available. The net’s 4-foot handle extends to 11 feet long, which is long enough to reach the most elusive leaf.

Pond Talk: When do you know it’s time to pack up your pond netting for the season?

Keep Leaves & Predators Out - View The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ Net Kit

How can I keep leaves out of my pond? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

How can I keep leaves out of my pond?

How can I keep leaves out of my pond? Rick – Birds, IL

This Tent’s Not for Camping

You may not want to admit it yet, but the summer season is coming to a close. While we love the mild weather and the changing colors of the trees, us water garden owners have to turn our attention to the falling leaves. No worries however, we have one simple tool that you can use to avoid having to deal with leaves falling into your water garden.

We are of course talking about pond netting. If you dealt with Herons in the summer you may already have a pond net on hand. While they are great for keeping unwanted predators out of your pond they are more commonly used for keeping leaves and other blowing debris from falling in. There are two basic styles of pond netting you can purchase. The most simplistic version of this being a pre cut piece of mesh netting. This netting is available in an Economy Grade which is ideal for single season use or a Heavy Duty version. You can pull this mesh tight across the surface of your pond and secure it using stakes or rocks. This application works well for water gardens that may receive minimal amounts of debris. If you are in a heavily wooded area or are prone to massive amounts of debris you will be better off utilizing a Pond Protector Net Kit that implements a domed design to better protect your pond. The netting included with the kit extends beyond the tent-style frame allowing you to pull netting along the contours of your pond so there are no gaps left open for debris to enter.

Keeping leaves out of your pond in the fall will help keep the pond clean and manageable going into the colder seasons and will ensure a faster, easier cleanout and start up next season. Leaves left in the pond to decompose tend to create “tea-colored” water due to the tannins they release in the decomposition process. You can fill Media Bags with Activated Carbon and place them in your filter boxes to help clear the water if this happens to you. Also continue to use Nature’s Defense® and Muck Defense® to manage the muck left behind by decomposing leaves and fish waste. As water temperatures fall below 50 degrees Fahrenheit you can switch from Nature’s Defense® and Muck Defense® to Seasonal Defense®. Seasonal Defense® is a cool water natural bacteria that will continue the decomposition process throughout the fall and winter.

POND TALK: Do you fight to keep leaves out of your pond in the Fall? Has a pond net helped make your end of season ponding easier and more enjoyable?

Keep the leaves out!

Do great blue herons fly south for the winter? – Water Garden & Features Q & A

Got herons? We have solutions!

Water Garden & Features Q & A

Q: Do great blue herons fly south for the winter? – Derek in Massachusetts

A: The bane of fishpond owners, great blue herons, will make a quick meal out of pricey koi and graceful goldfish. The good news is that those in the northern swath of the United States are about to enjoy their exit – at least for the winter months.

These birds are one of the most widespread wading birds in North America. While herons’ breeding range stretches from the southern Canadian provinces to southern Mexico, their wintering and permanent range extends from southeastern Massachusetts along the coastal states and west across the southern half of the United States, and into Mexico and northern South America. So when the temperatures dip, they prefer to fly south to the warmer climates.

If you live in the northern regions of New England, the Great Lakes, the Northern Plains and regions that freeze during the winter, you will see the herons fly for warmer skies. Experts report the birds migrate south from the northern portions of their breeding range beginning in September and October, with their return in mid-March.

For those who live in great blue herons’ wintering and permanent range, you’ll unfortunately enjoy no wintertime respite from these sushi-eating birds. Here are some ways to keep your fish safe:

Install pond netting: A near-invisible barrier, pond nets, like the Atlantic™ Pond Protector Net Kit, prevent the birds from landing in your water feature and spearing your fish. They also keep fall leaves from turning your pond into an over-sized tea pot.

Put up a decoy: Because herons are territorial, you can place a Heron Decoy near your pond to dissuade others from landing. Be sure to move it periodically to keep up the appearance of a live bird.

Spray the birds away: Motion Activated Scarecrow devices, which shoot a 35-foot blast of water at any animal that breaches its sensor sweep, make excellent deterrents for not only heron, but raccoon and other predators, too.

POND TALK: What do you do to deter herons from landing in your yard?

Keeping Leaves Out of Your Water Garden with Pond Netting – Water Garden Q & A

Picture of Pond Netting Over a Water Garden.

Q: My water garden is placed by a tree and a ton of leaves collect in my water garden. It is a real pain cleaning the pond out at the end of the year. What can I do to prevent leaves from coming in? – Matt of Pennsylvania

A: This is definitely an issue that should be addressed. By preventing leaves from entering the pond, you will help reduce the “muck” build-up, allowing for less pond maintenance.

Using Pond Netting to Keep the Leaves Out: A simple solution to keeping leaves out is to place a pond netting over your water garden. Most pond netting will come with their own stakes that can be used to keep the net in place. This is by far the best and easiest way to accomplish this.

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