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When can I put my fountain back in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When can I put my fountain back in my pond?

Q: When can I put my fountain back in my pond?

John – Pataskala, OH

A: Fountains do more than create an attractive splash in your pond or lake. They also allow for greater gas exchange at the water’s surface, expelling dangerous ammonia and drawing in healthy oxygen for your fish and other sub-surface critters.

When spring rolls around, it’s time to reinstall your fountain – but before you do, be sure to check your Farmer’s Almanac or with your meteorologist. Make sure there’s little chance of the pond icing over again.

Once you’re sure that temps will remain above freezing, perform some quick maintenance tasks before submerging the fountain and anchoring it into position, including:

  • Clean It Up: Pull out a power washer and spray down the motor so built-up material doesn’t trap heat.
  • Check the Cord: Inspect the power cord for cuts.
  • Make It Muskrat-Proof: Protect the cord with ratcord (power cord sleeve) if you have muskrats in your area.
  • Maintenance Visit: Send the motor in for regular seal and oil maintenance if you haven’t done so in a few years.

When you put your fountain back into place, make sure the mooring lines are snug enough to keep it secure. When anchoring with blocks at the bottom of the pond, make sure the lines are spread far enough apart so the fountain doesn’t spin from the force of the motor, which could cause the lines to get tangled.

As soon as you’ve put your fountain back in place, add your first dose of Pond Dye to the water so the spraying action will disperse the color evenly. Nature’s Blue™ or Black DyeMond™ will shade the water, minimize algae blooms and give your landscape a natural-looking pop of color

Pond Talk: What’s your fountain’s favorite spray pattern?

Convenient Water-Soluble Packets - Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye Packets

How do I restart my aeration system after storing it for the winter? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

How do I restart my aeration system after storing it for the winter?

Q: How do I restart my aeration system after storing it for the winter?

Allan – West Jordan, UT

A: Pond season is quickly on its way—and wouldn’t it be nice to restart your aeration system with the flip of an on-off switch? Unfortunately, it’s not quite that easy. If the aerators in your fish pond or lake were shut down for the winter, they’ll require some basic inspection and maintenance to ensure they’re ready to run.

Don’t worry. We’ve made the annual chore easy with these five aeration system maintenance tips.

1. Replace Your Air Filter

As part of your overall aeration system maintenance, the first thing to do is take a look at your air filter. Is it caked with dust and debris? Does it need to be replaced? A new air filter, like Pond Logic® SilentAir™ Air Filter, should ideally go in every six months or every three to four months if it’s in a dusty environment. A clean filter allows clean air to pump through the compressor, which means it will endure less wear and tear—and last longer.

You can try to clean the air filter, but its performance will still be reduced (note: never place a wet element back in the filter!). Many times, it’s easier to simply replace the filter element rather than the entire filter unit.

2. Check Your Diffusers

Next, take a look at your diffusers, particularly if it has been a few years since you’ve brought up the diffuser plates. Give them a light cleaning and inspection to make sure you see no cracks or tears. When running, a properly functioning diffuser should release small air bubbles; large bubbles may indicate some damage. If the diffuser sticks are beyond repair, replace them with Pond Logic® ProAir™ Membrane Diffuser Sticks.

3. Rebuild Your Pistons

Was your aeration system producing less air last year than the season before? The piston may be wearing out. Get out your Pond Logic® Piston Compressor Maintenance Kit and repair or replace any parts that are worn or malfunctioning. Quick repair of the compressor will ensure your fish pond or lake gets proper aeration all summer long.

4. Slowly Flick the Switch

Once you’ve performed these maintenance chores, introduce the aeration slowly. Doing so at full force may cause the water to mix too quickly, which can cause your fish to stress. Instead, run the system for an hour the first day, two hours the second day, four hours the next day—essentially, doubling the running time each day until your run time reaches 24 hours.

5. Check the Manual

Of course, if you get stuck or need technical guidance, see the Airmax® Aeration System Product Manual for additional tips and maintenance instructions.

Pond Talk: How long does it take you to get your aeration system up and running in the spring?

Breathe Some Life Into Your Pond - Airmax® Aeration Systems

How Do I Revive My Aeration System After Storing It For The Entire Winter? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

How Do I Revive My Aeration System After Storing It For The Entire Winter?

Q: How Do I Revive My Aeration System After Storing It For The Entire Winter?

John – Sumner, IA

A: If you turned your aerator off and stored it for the winter they are a few quick steps you can take to have your aeration system prepped and installed for the spring. If your winter has been anything like ours in southeastern Michigan, spring already seems upon us.

Here’s 4 ways to prep and install your aeration system for spring.

1.)  Change the Air Filter: The air filter is vital for providing clean air through the compressor. With a clogged air filter, performance diminishes and over time can cause irreversible damage to the compressor. We recommend changing your air filter every 3-6 months depending on the environment.

2.)  Check for Air: Before installing the unit and connecting airlines it is best to do a quick check for air. Turn the unit on and ensure air is coming out of the flex hose(s). If you have a multiple diffuser plate system, make sure that the valves are not completely shut off. In the event where air is not coming from the flex hoses, you may need a maintenance kit to replace worn seals.

3.)  Reinstall the unit: To reinstall the unit, you’ll want to reposition the cabinet so it is sitting level, reconnect the airlines and plug it in. Adjust the airflow as needed, which you’ll need to do anyway if you have multiple diffuse plates. Adjust the flow so each air plate receives equal amounts of airflow and keep in mind that longer runs and deeper plates will require more airflow to operate than shallow plates and shorter lines. It usually takes a few minutes between adjustments to see the effect at the diffuser plant, so be patient!

4.)  Proper start up: Introduce your aeration system slowly in the beginning, and gradually increase its running time each day. Start by running it for an hour the first day, two hours the second day, doubling the amount of time each day until you can successfully run it for 24 hours. If you run the system immediately for 24 hours upon returning it to the pond, you could cause the warm and cold layers of water to mix too quickly which may harm fish.

These quick steps will ensure your aeration system is back up and running to keep your pond clean, clear and healthy for years to come.

POND TALK: Do you use your pond for recreation in the winter?

Airmax® Aeration Systems - Breathe Some Life Into Your Pond

Fountain Basics – Spring Maintenance & Re-Installation | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Pond Season Has Begun!

Fountain Basics – Spring Maintenance & Re-Installation

When the weather warms and the ice on your lake melts, it’s time to kick off pond season! But before you dust off your boat and fishing pole, you need to do a little fountain maintenance and installation first.

If you didn’t perform regular upkeep on your fountain when you pulled it out last fall, now’s the time to do so. Here’s a quick list of to-do items before you put the fountain back in place:

  • Power wash the motor so built-up material doesn’t trap heat.
  • Inspect the cord for cuts.
  • If you have muskrats, protect the cord with ratcord.
  • Send the motor in for regular seal/oil maintenance if you haven’t done it in a few years.

Once it’s cleaned up an inspected, you can position your fountain. Be sure your mooring lines are snug enough to hold your fountain in place. If you’re anchoring it with blocks at the bottom of the pond, make sure they’re spread far enough apart so the fountain doesn’t spin from the force of the motor, which could cause the lines to get tangled.

Now is a great time to add that first dose of pond dye, too. Nature’s Blue™, Twilight Blue™ or Black DyeMond™ shade and protect the pond while enhancing its beauty. If you put the dye in at the same time as your fountain, the color will disperse evenly throughout the lake.

Pond Talk: What’s the first thing you plan to do once pond season begins?

Pond Logic® Pond Dye - Shade & Protect Your Pond

What should I do with my fountain in the winter? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

What should I do with my fountain in the winter?

Q: What should I do with my fountain in the winter?

David – Crystal Lake, IL

A: Do you have a decorative fountain in your lake or pond? If so, take advantage of the off season and do all your maintenance chores now rather than in the spring—when you could be caught without a fountain for that early-season party.

Any time before the ice begins to form on your pond, remove your fountain and perform these basic upkeep tasks:

1. Power Check: Check the fountain’s power cord for any cuts or cracks. If you find any, you may need to repair the cord or replace the unit altogether.

2. Power Cleaning: Next, pull out your power washer and clean the fountain’s float and motor to remove debris buildup that’s occurred over the past year (or however long you’ve procrastinated …). Built-up debris can act as an insulator, which can possibly cause your fountain’s motor to overheat during the summer months.

3. Routine Maintenance: Finally, contact your fountain’s manufacturer or call your local fountain dealer to have routine maintenance performed on the motor. Its seals and oil should be replaced every year or two to ensure good performance.

When spring rolls around, put your decorative fountain back in place—but until then, make sure you keep your pond or lake aerated with a diffused aeration system, like the Airmax® Deep Water Aeration System. It efficiently pushes tiny oxygen bubbles throughout your pond’s water column all winter long

Pond Talk: How often do you perform maintenance on your pond or lake’s decorative fountain?

Airmax® Aeration Systems - Eliminate Fall Leaves & Debris

I’ve inherited an overgrown pond. How can I whip it back into shape? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

I’ve inherited an overgrown pond. How can I whip it back into shape?

Q: I’ve inherited an overgrown pond. How can I whip it back into shape?

Kent – Maurice, LA

A: Congratulations! You just purchased your dream property with rolling fields, lush green trees and a gorgeous lake or pond – or at least that’s how you remembered it when you signed the loan documents.

But once you move in and take a closer look at the situation, you realize that gorgeous lake is an overgrown nightmare. Believe it or not, this is not an uncommon scenario. Many new land owners purchase property with a lake or a pond only to discover it hasn’t been well maintained.

Of course, you want to reclaim that overgrown pond and turn it into a useable recreation or livestock watering area, but where do you begin? Check out these six tips for whipping your lake back into shape.

1. Evaluate the Situation

Your first task is to evaluate the pond itself and record what you find. What is its size, shape and depth? Is there an abundance of weeds? Can you find an aeration system? Are there fish living in the pond? Jot down as many details as you can, because they will be important when deciding what kinds of product to use to regain control of your lake. The more you know, the better.

2. Install Aeration

Next, install an aeration system. Aeration, which circulates oxygen throughout the water column, will go a long way toward improving the health of your pond while you regain control of the habitat and work to maintain it. Plus, your fish and the natural bacteria living in the pond rely on the mechanical water turnover to replenish the oxygen supply and remove harmful gasses like ammonia.

3. Identify Weeds and Treat Them

What weeds are growing in your pond? To help you identify the greenery and determine whether they’re beneficial plants or nuisances, check out The Pond Guy® weed control guide. Once you have the plants ID’d, you can then select the proper chemicals and the right amount to handle the job. Start treating the weeds with a suitable algaecide or herbicide once your aeration system is well established.

4. Rake Out Dead Debris

Yes, it seems like a tough job, but you will need to rake out and remove dead debris, like fallen leaves, cattails and other decomposing organic materials with a weed cutter and rake, like the Pond Logic® Pond Rake and Weed Cutter. The hard work will pay off in the long run. The more large debris you remove, the less work your muck-destroying beneficial bacteria and aeration system will need to do – and the faster your pond will get back into tip-top shape.

5. Maintain, Maintain, Maintain

To keep your pond or lake on the fast track to being clean, clear and usable, you must keep up on the maintenance chores. Remove the years of pond muck buildup with natural bacteria or phosphate binder, like those found in Pond Logic® ClearPAC® PLUS pond care package. Continue to remove dead and decomposing debris as your herbicides kill nuisance weeds. Add pond dye for aesthetic appeal and to slow algae growth. Now that you have the overgrown pond under control, don’t let it get away from you!

6. Be Patient and Persistent

Despite your efforts, it will take time to reclaim your pond or lake – so be realistic about your expectations. Consider the pond’s age and the amount of debris it has accumulated over the years. If it took a decade or more for the pond to look it way it did, it will take more than one afternoon of hard work to make it pristine again! Be patient and persistent. You’ll have that gorgeous pond in no time.

Pond Talk: If you’ve purchased property with a pond or lake, what kind of condition was it in and what did you do to make it usable?

Airmax Aeration Systems - Reduce 90 Percent of Nutrients in 90 Days

Is there an easier way to get rid of weeds? I’m tired of pulling them by hand. | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Is there an easier way to get rid of weeds? I’m tired of pulling them by hand.

Q: Is there an easier way to get rid of weeds? I’m tired of pulling them by hand.

Beverly – Richfield, WI

A: Who doesn’t love tools? They’re cool to look at, fun to play with – and, the best part, they help make chores easy. When it comes to maintaining your pond or lake, tools of all shapes and sizes will come in very handy, particularly these four must-haves, below.

Pond Rake

A pond rake pulls, gathers and removes dead debris from the surface or the bottom of a pond.

Debris on the surface of a pond, like algae or fallen leaves, can sink to the bottom and start to decay, adding to the muck and detritus that’s already there. All that debris degrades water quality, compromises fish health, provides a nutrient source for nuisance plants, and can even affect chemical treatments’ ability to work.

A floating/sub-surface pond rake, like the Pond Logic® Pond and Beach Rake, or a sub-surface pond rake, like the Jenlis Weed Raker™, lends a long helping hand. Elongated by rope so you can easily get the deep-water growth, both rakes work by removing submerged lake and pond weeds by their roots, slowing their spread.

Weed Cutter

A weed cutter, like the Pond Logic® Weed Cutter and the Jenlis WeedRazer®, mechanically slices through weeds at their stems so they can then be raked out.

The 28-inch, double-sided Pond Logic® Weed Cutter features a two-piece, rust-proof, powder-coated aluminum handle that’s 11 feet long. It’s great for removing floating aquatic vegetation, marginal weeds and cattails that extend past the pond’s edge.

The V-shaped Jenlis WeedRazer™ clears a 4-foot-wide path in pond weeds by sinking to the bottom and slicing through submerged weeds like watermilfoil, cattails and lily pads as you pull it across the pond. The razor-sharp tool weighs just 8 pounds, making it light enough to toss 30 feet or more yet heavy enough to sink straight to the bottom.

Sprayer

A sprayer makes pond chemical application easy. Most liquid chemicals are more effective when they’re sprayed over the target weed, and a tank sprayer, like an Airmax® Specialty Pressurized Pond Chemical Tank Sprayer, is designed just for this purpose. The 2.75-gallon pond tool features a wide-mouth fill top that minimizes accidental spills, a brass corrosive-resistant handle, and a high-pressure tank that allows you to spray hard-to-reach weeds.

Invest in a separate sprayer just for pond chemicals. If you use lawn and garden chemicals in the same sprayer that you use on your pond, doing so can be toxic to fish and other aquatic life as residue could be left behind. Keep your fish and pond plants healthy and happy: Use a different tool for the job.

Granular Spreader

The final must-have tool is a granular spreader, which helps you disperse granular herbicides evenly over your target area – and that means a more effective weed kill-off. The rust-proof Earthway® Granular Hand Spreader holds 10 pounds of material in a large hopper and features an application adjuster that lets you control how much product is released with its smooth-action hand crank.

Pond Talk: If you could only have one pond-care tool in your toolbox, what would it be? Why?

Pond Logic Pond & Beach Rake - Remove Weeds & Muck Build Up

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