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Are Floating Plants Good For My Water Garden? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Are Floating Plants Good For My Water Garden?

Jean – Emmaus, PA

Yes. To maintain a healthy, well-balanced eco-system for your fish and prevent algae build-up, aim for 40-60% coverage of your pond with pond plants. Floating plants are an important part of the mix. Floating plants such as water hyacinth and water lettuce are chosen most often because they are prolific growers so just a few go a long way. In an 8′ x 10′ pond, 6-10 floating plants are more than enough to get started.

Floating plants protect your fish from the sun, (Yes, fish can get sunburned!) as well as hide them from predators. Floating plants also have extensive root systems to remove excess nutrients from the water. Removing these excessive nutrients will clear the water and help reducer future algae blooms.

While floating plants are a must, there are many other aquatic plants that should be part of the mix. Click over to our Planting Aquatic Plants article to read more about aquatic plant selections and how to plant pond plants.

Pond Talk: What floating plants are in your pond?

Water Hyacinth

I have a waterfall in my pond, is that enough aeration? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

I have a waterfall in my pond, is that enough aeration?

I have a waterfall in my pond, is that enough aeration?
Robert – Racine, WI

Waterfalls are one of nature’s greatest creations. In addition to providing breathtaking beauty and places for daredevils to kayak and – for some inexplicable reason – ride over in padded barrels, they serve as massive aeration systems, introducing fresh oxygen into the ecosystem that fish and plants need to thrive. In backyard ponds, waterfalls serve many of the same functions – but their scale is often inadequate to provide sufficient aeration. They also fall a bit short as places for kayakers and barrel riders to strut their stuff.

So, while your backyard waterfall definitely helps to keep water oxygenated, additional aeration is always helpful – especially when algae begins to grow, and fish are faced with warming water and reduced oxygen levels. To provide the aeration any backyard pond needs, we strongly recommend our KoiAir™ and PondAir™ Aeration Systems. With a wide variety of options available for ponds of every size and depth, these systems help to increase circulation and reduce stratification to provide the healthiest possible environment for fish and decorative plants.

For signs that your pond’s aeration is insufficient, look for increases in muck and debris at the pond bottom. When properly aerated, muck is broken up naturally, leaving the bottom clean and the water clear. If you have fish, and they surface regularly or gather beneath a waterfall, your aeration may be inadequate. If that’s the case, you’ll give your fish cause for celebration by installing additional aeration – and you’ll have the satisfaction of a clean, clear pond that makes your backyard the perfect sanctuary.

Pond Talk: Do you run a separate aeration system in your pond?

Airmax® PondAir™

What are the differences between a true Koi pond and a water garden? | Decorative Ponds & Watergardens Q&A

What are the differences between a true Koi pond and a water garden?

What are the differences between a true Koi pond and a water garden?
Natalie _ San Francisco, CA

When it comes to backyard ponds you may hear multiple names thrown out like water garden, Koi pond, decorative pond or other, more creative, titles. While these names are used loosely and interchangeably by many-a-pond owner there are considerable differences between a water garden and a Koi pond used for spawning and raising Koi.

So what draws the line in the sand between Koi ponds and water gardens? Water gardens are geared more towards the every-day pond owner as they are tailored to be easier to construct and maintain while having a higher aesthetic appeal and yard friendly design. Decorated with spitters, plants, lighting and other outdoor décor, water gardens can contain can contain all types of fish with goldfish and Koi being the most popular. Koi ponds tend to be sought after by pond owners that plan raising an abundance of Koi for selling or showing in fish clubs or competitions. With this goal in mind these ponds discourage the presence of species like goldfish as they breed prolifically and take up valuable space for their prize winning koi.

Another distinguishing factor is the design of the pond itself. Water gardens are typically less than 2 ft. in depth and contain plant shelves around the outside perimeter to hold a wide variety of aquatic habitat and visual stimulation. While a koi pond may also include plants for filtration or aesthetic appeal the design of this type of pond is all about the koi. These ponds do not contain plant shelves and are usually 4 ft. in depth or more. One reason for this is to discourage predators and increase useable area for their fish to roam and grow. Koi ponds also utilize bottom drains and large amounts of water flow to create ideal breeding conditions. As Koi breeders want to fit as many fish as they can into their ponds they rely on complex heavy duty filtration systems, and UV sterilizers to keep pond water clean. These systems are much more complex then the pond skimmers, pressurized filters and waterfall boxes water gardeners use.

Have the pond already but need help getting it established? Check out our fish and plant packages. Also, for more information on koi breeding click over to our blog on Fish Reproduction. Need help deciding? There are also a wide array of informational books and videos for those of you who are just looking to get started in the watergarden or koi pond hobby.

Pond Talk: What type of pond do you have?

Live Fish

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