• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

I added too much pond dye. What do I do? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I added too much pond dye. What do I do?

Q: I added too much pond dye. What do I do?

Roy – Bend, OR

A: Pond dye is a good thing for many reasons, like algae control, aesthetics and camouflage from predators. Plus, it’s totally safe for animals, fish and humans who like to go for a dip in the water. But too much pond dye can create a monochromatic mess that looks totally unnatural in a landscape.

So what can you do? Not much, unfortunately. The only practical solution is to wait it out while long periods of sunshine fade the color or heavy rains dilute the dye. It will eventually lose its black or blue hue, but it will take a bit.

To prevent this from happening again, calculate your pond’s surface area and depth before you add color to your pond or lake so that you use the right amount of dye. Two Pond Dye Packets or one liquid quart of Pond Dye Concentrate treats up to one surface acre with an average depth of four to six feet deep.

Here’s how to figure out those important numbers:

Surface Area: First, figure out your pond’s square footage. If it’s rectangular or square, determine its size by simply measuring its length and width and multiplying them (250 feet x 250 feet = 62,500 square feet). If your pond is irregularly shaped, break it up into several segments, measure or pace off each one’s length and width, calculate the square footage and add them together. [(100 feet x 300 feet) + (40 feet x 50 feet) = 30,000 + 2,000 = 32,000 square feet.]

To determine your pond’s surface area, divide its total square footage by 43,560. So in the above example, 62,500 square feet / 43,560 = ~1½ acres; and 32,000 square feet / 43,560 = ~3/4 acre.

Pond Depth: To measure its depth, gather some tools, including a tape measure, some chain or string, a weight, something to write with, and a boat or canoe. Mark a chain or knot a string in 1-foot intervals using your tape measure and attach the weight to one end. Climb aboard your boat, travel to various areas in your pond and drop the weight in the water, noting where you feel it hit bottom. Take an average of those measurements to get your depth.

Once you have your numbers, use the appropriate amount of dye. Unsure of your pond’s size? No worries! Add 1 packet and wait 24 hours. If it looks like you need more, add another packet. Simple as that!

Pond Talk: Have you ever had a pond dye problem in your pond or lake? If so, what happened – and how did you correct it?

Shade & Protect Your Pond - Pond Logic® Pond Dye Packets

When can I put my fountain back in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When can I put my fountain back in my pond?

Q: When can I put my fountain back in my pond?

John – Pataskala, OH

A: Fountains do more than create an attractive splash in your pond or lake. They also allow for greater gas exchange at the water’s surface, expelling dangerous ammonia and drawing in healthy oxygen for your fish and other sub-surface critters.

When spring rolls around, it’s time to reinstall your fountain – but before you do, be sure to check your Farmer’s Almanac or with your meteorologist. Make sure there’s little chance of the pond icing over again.

Once you’re sure that temps will remain above freezing, perform some quick maintenance tasks before submerging the fountain and anchoring it into position, including:

  • Clean It Up: Pull out a power washer and spray down the motor so built-up material doesn’t trap heat.
  • Check the Cord: Inspect the power cord for cuts.
  • Make It Muskrat-Proof: Protect the cord with ratcord (power cord sleeve) if you have muskrats in your area.
  • Maintenance Visit: Send the motor in for regular seal and oil maintenance if you haven’t done so in a few years.

When you put your fountain back into place, make sure the mooring lines are snug enough to keep it secure. When anchoring with blocks at the bottom of the pond, make sure the lines are spread far enough apart so the fountain doesn’t spin from the force of the motor, which could cause the lines to get tangled.

As soon as you’ve put your fountain back in place, add your first dose of Pond Dye to the water so the spraying action will disperse the color evenly. Nature’s Blue™ or Black DyeMond™ will shade the water, minimize algae blooms and give your landscape a natural-looking pop of color

Pond Talk: What’s your fountain’s favorite spray pattern?

Convenient Water-Soluble Packets - Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye Packets

What color pond dye will work best in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: What color pond dye will work best in my pond?

Q: What color pond dye will work best in my pond?

Brian – Kansas City, KS

A: Pond dye is great stuff. It not only enhances your pond or lake’s aesthetic appeal with hues that compliment your landscape, but it also shades the water from the sun’s rays, preventing pesky algae growth and helping you maintain a healthy pond.

Pond dye color is really a matter of personal preference, but different shades are better suited to different situations.

  • Do you have a decorative pond? Try Nature’s Blue dye – our customers’ favorite choice. It’s the ideal color for ornamental water features as it contrasts perfectly with lush green landscaping.
  • Do you prefer a more natural look? Try Twilight Blue dye. It maintains a neutral blackish-blue tint that shades and protects your pond without making drastic changes to its natural coloring.
  • Do you want to showcase your landscape? Consider using Black DyeMond dye. It creates a mirrored surface that reflects surrounding trees and natural rocky landscapes, making it perfect for natural ponds in wooded areas.

We recommend you use pond dye year-round. Pond Logic® Pond Dye is a concentrated formula that you simply pour in several spots along your pond’s edge. Apply it monthly or as needed to maintain the blue or black hue all year long. Pond Logic® Pond Dye PLUS is the same formula as our traditional pond dye – but we’ve added beneficial bacteria to the mix to help keep your pond looking crystal clear.

Pond Talk: What’s your favorite pond dye – and why?

Protect and Shade Your Pond- Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye

Can I swim in the pond if I add pond dye? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Can I swim in the pond if I add pond dye?

Can I swim in the pond if I add pond dye?
Sarah – Reno, NV

For a lot of good reasons – beyond the fact that blue skin isn’t terribly flattering on anyone – this is a question that begs for an answer. We’ll start with the basics. At the Pond Guy, we sell a variety of pond dyes – including Pond Logic Nature’s Blue, Twilight Blue and Black Dyemond, and Pond Logic Nature’s Blue PLUS and Twilight Blue PLUS which both include bacteria. For the sake of safety, all of the pond dyes we carry are food grade – which ensures that they’re safe for recreational use, including swimming. Because our dyes are food grade, even an accidental slurp of dyed pond water is no cause for concern.

Since our dyes pose no health risks to people or pets, the second line of inquiry about pond dyes usually involves the potential for staining. In its concentrated form, pond dyes will stain pretty much anything. Clothes, skin, pets, rocks – you name it. When you put a lot of dye in one place, it’s bound to leave a mark. But when applied properly in a pond, and permitted to disperse for 24 to 48 hours, dyes pose little to no risk of staining.

In the event that you or your pet come into contact with concentrated dye, there’s no need to worry. Food grade dyes pose no threat to health whatsoever – even in concentrated forms. On the downside, however, it may take a while for you to shed your new hue. Over time, dyes will fade, and your skin – or Rover’s fur – will be back to its natural tint.

Pond Talk: Do you use dye in your pond?

Pond Logic® Nature's Blue™ Pond Dye Plus

When is the best time to stock fish in my pond? | Pond & Lake Q&A

When is the best time to stock fish in my pond?

When is the best time to stock fish in my pond?
Jan – Raleigh, NC

Pond owners looking to replenish their fish populations this season should grab their buckets and nets; spring is here and it is the perfect time to stock your pond with new game fish.

Spring and fall are the best times to add new fish to your pond as the temperatures are not as harsh making it easier for you to transport your newcomers and acclimate them to their new home. You can still introduce fish into your pond during the summer months but you will want to take extra precautions to make sure you can quickly transport the fish to your pond and take a little extra time during the acclimation process.

Deciding how many fish to add to your pond will predominately depend on the surface area of the water body. You can take a look at a few examples of stocking rates on our website. You will want to stick to a ratio of 3 prey fish (sunfish, bluegill, or perch) to 1 predator fish (bass) when choosing species to promote a healthy and balance fish population. Click over to our Fish Stocking Blog for some more information.

You can purchase fish from your local fish hatchery or catch and transport fish from a friend’s pond. Wherever the source, inspect the fish for signs of illness or disease before adding them to your pond. Our local customers can take advantage of The Pond Guy semi-annual Fish Day which takes place on the 7th of May. Fish day is a great opportunity to meet with other pond owners, speak with the friendly and knowledgeable The Pond Guy staff, and browse our wide selection of pond products from Pond Dye to 10’ Windmills. Customers can place orders online or over the phone until May 7th which will be available for payment and pick-up on the 8th between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. There will be a wide selection of both predator and prey fish available for purchase including Hybrid Bluegill, Perch, Catfish and Bass. Walk-ins are welcome but selection will be limited by availability.

Make sure there is adequate habitat for your smaller fish to hide, grow and reproduce. Weeds, grasses and other debris already in your pond will provide some cover but you can introduce man made habitats to protect your fish without dealing with weeds and plants. Check out our Fish Habitat blog for some more insight into creating comfortable living spaces for your fish.

Pond Talk: What fish have you found in your pond?

Fish Trap

How can I find out the size of my pond? | Pond & Lake Q&A

There are some weeds in the pond but do I need to add anything else for my fish?

How can I find out the size of my pond?
Paul – Scottsdale, AZ

While most of us could take a quick guess at the size of our pond many times we don’t really know the true dimensions. Most products for pond treatment such as aquatic herbicides, algaecides, and pond dye are dosed based on surface acres or square footage. Being off by 30 ft. in pond measurement could mean reducing or increasing your pond size enough to make a treatment ineffective. So how should you go about getting the correct measurements of your pond?

It is important to understand that measuring your pond involves using a universal unit of measure like feet and inches. While you may know what you mean when you say the water comes up to your chin that will be interpreted differently from person to person. For measuring depth, tie a weight to some string and let it sink to the bottom of the pond, pull the string in just enough so there is no slack left. Mark the string at the surface of the water. Once you bring up your weight lay the line out on the ground and measure it with a tape measure for a more accurate reading. Take measurements in multiple areas as most ponds are not the same depth throughout. When measuring overall lengths and widths you can use a flexible tape to gather dimensions or measure your stride and pace off the dimensions. Typically one pace is around 3ft. If your pond is irregular in shape you can also use online applications like Google Earth and Bing to locate your pond and measure it from the comfort of your computer chair.

To calculate your pond size you must first figure the square footage of the pond. Multiply the length of your pond by the width to find your square footage. Let’s use a 200’ long by 100’ wide pond as an example. 200’x 100’ equals 20,000 square feet. 1 surface acre consists of 43,560 square feet. To find out how our 20,000 square foot pond measures up to 1 acre we can simply divide 20,000 by 43,560. You should end up with .45 surface acres or slightly under ½ surface acre. If your pond better represents a triangle or circle you can use the equations given below to help calculate the total surface area.

Pond Size Dimensions

If you are unsure of the best method for measuring your pond or want a second opinion you can always contact one of our pond guys and gals toll free at 866.766.3710 or use our web calculator.

Pond Talk: Was your pond dimension “guess” accurate with your actual pond measurements?

Airmax Aeration

Is there anything I should do for my pond/lake to prepare it for Spring? – Ponds & Lakes Q & A

Dyed Pond

Q: Is there anything I should do for my pond/lake to prepare it for Spring? – Dan in Illinois

Breaking the Ice on Your Spring Pond Projects
With the sun shining brighter than ever and the snow finally disappearing, most of us pond guys and gals are itching to throw on our waders and dive into our ponds — figuratively of course.

As the Saying Goes, “An Ounce of Prevention…”
Ok, so none of us really want to spend our spring and summer in waders pulling weeds and tending to unruly ponds. So what can you do to ensure your Winter/Spring transition is smooth and enjoyable? As the saying goes, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” This is especially true in the months to come. Following some easy procedures will keep those waders in your closest and a smile on your face.

Do Your Pre-Spring Cleaning
Walk around your pond and pick up any debris that has made its way into your yard and around your shoreline. If left to sit, this clutter will turn into a food source for algae in the spring. Cut back any weeds or unwanted vegetation growing around the pond while it is still dormant, keeping it from taking over your pond as the temperatures rise. Now is also a great time to inspect and clean your aeration system cabinet and, if the ice has already melted in your pond, the plates as well. This would be a good opportunity to move the plates back to the deeper areas of your pond for summer aeration, if you happened to move them to shallower areas during the winter.

Shaken, Not Stirred
With all of the dye, beneficial bacteria, and occasional algaecide we’ve added to our ponds over the seasons, you just may be qualified to tend a tiki bar at your pond. While your PondClear™ and EcoBoost™ get the back shelf for the winter season, you should be adding dye to your pond year-round as algae can still grow under a layer of ice in the colder months. If you have not been doing so, add your dye now to reduce the amount of sunlight available. Preventing algae growth now will keep you from fighting an algae bloom in the spring. Your PondClear™ and EcoBoost™ treatments should continue once the water temperature is above 50º F. For those of us who suffer from Duckweed, as spring approaches, you will want to have your WhiteCap™ on hand and ready to apply come mid-April so it has a chance to go to work and prevent weeds from growing throughout the season.

Take Inventory
Kris Kringle is not the only one checking his list twice over the winter. Pond guys and gals everywhere should be checking their remaining ClearPAC® and necessary weed control products and replenishing these items for the upcoming season. Inspect your tools and decoys to make sure they are in working condition. With everything in working order and ready to use, you are now ready for anything spring sends your way. All that’s left to do now is enjoy your pond!

POND TALK: How do you break the ice on your Spring pond projects? What do you have planned for your pond or water garden this season?

Why do people put dye in their decorative ponds? – Water Garden & Features Q & A

Pond Dye

Water Garden & Features Q & A

A: If you’re new to the hobby, the thought of adding dye to your pond may seem like a foreign concept! Why would you want to add color to the water that you’re working so hard to keep clear? Well, there are aesthetic reasons – and some practical reasons, too.

Understanding Dye

First, let’s discuss the dyes themselves. Pond dye typically comes in two colors: black and blue. Black pond dye, like Pond Logic Black Pearl Pond Dye, gives shaded ponds a rich look and turns a brown or gray water feature into a stunning pool that reflects the trees and landscape. Blue pond dye, like Pond Logic Blue Sapphire Pond Dye, gives ponds a natural-looking blue color and looks best in features surrounded by manicured or open landscapes. You’ll find these pond dyes in concentrated form. When you add the recommended amount, the coloring will diffuse throughout the pond within several hours. They’re safe for people, pets, fish and water fowl.

Why Dye?

Adding dye to your decorative pond does more than give your water feature a unique and appealing look. The dye actually serves several purposes, from controlling algae and simulating depth to protecting fish and masking a murky pond.

Simulate depth: Some people use dye in their ponds to make a shallow pond seem deeper. If you have a 14-inch-deep pond, adding black dye can make it seem 5 feet deep. The optical illusion creates a mirroring effect that appeals to many pond owners.

Fish safety: When predators fly overhead or lurk alongside the pond, a little pond dye – along with some predator control – will go a long way in protecting your fish. Koi and goldfish will dart to your pond’s dark depths when a heron or raccoon threatens them. The pond dye serves a similar purpose.

Aesthetics: Of course, aesthetics remain an important reason why folks use dye in their ponds. A crystal blue pond or a rich reflective pond mimics what you’d find in nature. Couple that with a tranquil landscape, and you have an attractive water feature that draws oohs and ahhs!

Algae control: The top reason why people add dye to their ponds is that it is widely known throughout the industry that it may inhibit algae growth. Algae thrives in sunlight and pond dyes filter those rays, preventing them from reaching below the surface, thereby preventing algae from growing.

POND TALK: Why do you use pond dye in your decorative pond or water garden? If you don’t use pond dye, why not?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 137 other followers