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Can Koi and Goldfish Breed? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Can Koi and Goldfish Breed?

Can Koi and Goldfish Breed? Sheldon – Huntington, KY

Would That Make It A Koldfish?

Your fish have finally spawned and after what seems like eons of waiting they are starting to grow into full grown Koi…or Goldfish…or…what are they? Your newcomers seem to have unique new patterns and colors that are difference than their alleged parents, is it possible your Koi and Goldfish have crossbred?

While it is possible to crossbreed the two types of fish, it is fairly uncommon for the process to naturally occur in your pond. The outcome of such instances yields sterile offspring that are unable to reproduce. It is much more common to produce new colors and varieties of fish due to two different types of goldfish reproducing. While some pond owners are curious about the potential to crossbreed their fish, many more would be happy to just experience the spawning process even once in their back yard water garden regardless of the results. If it has not happened for you yet, make sure you are providing adequate habitat in the form of submerged plants so if your Koi do spawn the eggs and fry will have places to attach and hide to avoid becoming an easy meal (yes Koi will eat their own young). Furthermore, maintain a healthy water feature by providing adequate filtration, aeration, and beneficial bacteria. Using the products in a Pond Logic® DefensePAC® will give you a wide assortment of products that simplify your pond maintenance and promote a clean healthy environment. Click over to our Koi Spawning Blog for a little more insight on the matter.

Pond Talk: Have you ever experienced this phenomenon?

Water Hyacinth

When should I start using my DefensePAC®? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Dyed Pond

When should I start using my DefensePAC®? – Sherry in Ohio

Ladies and Gentlemen, Start Your… Barley?
You’ve bought the products; you’ve read the blogs; now it’s time to get your feet wet. Whether you are starting your water garden up for the first time this season or your pond is operating through the Winter/Spring transition, it’s time to break out the barley.

Some Like It Hot, Some Like It Cold
For those of you pond guys and gals who experience freezing temperatures, you are probably waiting for the ice to melt to start up the pumps and filters in your water garden. When that glorious day comes, take some time and install new filter media, vacuum the bottom of the pond, and clean up the rocks and walls with you Oxy-Lift™ Defense®. Now that your water garden is up and running, it is time for some Seasonal Defense®, a natural bacteria that incorporates barley and is designed to work in cooler temperatures. This bacteria will jump start your biological filters and devour organic debris, allowing you to gain control of your pond earlier in the season. As we progress into late spring and the water temperatures begin to rise above 50ºF, you can switch over to your Nature’s Defense®.

Don’t Get Lost In The Mix
So, now we know Nature’s Defense® performs best in warmer temperatures, while Seasonal Defense® goes to work for you when it’s cold. When do you break out the Muck Defense® and Clarity Defense® to really get the party started? Clarity Defense® should be used whenever your water garden is open. It will work in any temperature, locking up suspended nutrients, resulting in clearer water and increasing the effectiveness of all natural bacteria. You can start using your Muck Defense® the same time you begin applications of Nature’s Defense®. While Nature’s Defense® is working on the organics floating in the water column, Muck Defense® will be at the bottom of the pond, eating away at sunken debris.

POND TALK: How do you use your DefensePAC® to kick off the season? Which DefensePAC® products do you feel go to work the best for you?

How do I control algae in my decorative pond, both long term and short term? – Water Garden & Features Q & A

All Rest, No Algae.

Water Garden & Features Q & A

Q: How do I control algae in my decorative pond, both long term and short term?
– Stefanie in Michigan

A: Algae blooms are the bane of most pond owners. All summer, they rear their green heads and turn a beautiful pond or water feature into a soupy or stringy mess. But with some planning, both the floating (pea-soup algae) and filamentous (string algae) species can be controlled in the short term and prevented in the long term. Here’s how:

Short-Term Solution

To get your decorative pond looking clean and clear right away, you’ll need to knock down the algae population by using a chemical herbicide, like AlgaeFix® or TetraPond’s® Algae Control. These algae-busters are safe for use in ponds with fish, but because they destroy algae so quickly, they can cause a drop in oxygen levels in your pond, especially during the warm summer months. Be sure that your pond is adequately aerated with a fountain, waterfall or underwater air diffuser.

Long-Term Prevention

To prevent that green goo from surfacing again, you need to limit its food source: Nutrients. Algae thrive on nutrients, which are the end product of the nitrogen cycle. The nitrogen cycle begins with ammonia released from fish waste and detritus. Nitrifying bacteria turn the ammonia into nitrites and then into nitrates (nutrients). The algae grow, the fish eat it and excrete it, and the cycle begins again.

So, how do you control the algae’s food source?
Try these approaches:

  • Keep your fish load to a minimum. Most pond owners love their fish, but if they plan to have 60 12-inch koi in a 1,000-gallon pond, they’re going to have an algae problem – which can be expensive to manage. So, when calculating your fish load, think of it in pounds of fish or total inches per gallon. Remember that your fish are growing and possibly multiplying, so plan for the future and remember: Less is best. Be careful not to overstock your decorative pond.
  • Increase the number of aquatic plants. Whether they’re submerged plants like hornwort, marginals like dwarf bamboo, or floating plants like water lilies and water hyacinth, aquatic plants consume the same food that algae does – nutrients. The more plants, the more the algae have to compete for those nutrients. Floating plants also shade the pond, which filters the sunlight and can slow the growth of sun-loving algae. You should try to cover 40 to 60 percent of your pond’s surface with floaters.
  • Check the filtration. The size and type of filtration system on a pond will depend on the fish load. If the filter is not properly sized for maximum potential, the fish will outgrow the filter and produce unhealthy amounts of ammonia, which could prove lethal to the fish. An inappropriately sized filter can also cause an algae bloom from the copious amounts of nutrients in the water. In most cases, filters on the market are rated for ponds containing no fish or a minimal fish load, so you should consider a filter that is rated for at least two times the water volume of your pond.
  • Toss in some beneficial bacteria. In addition to ensuring the proper mechanical filtration, you may also consider adding some additional biological filtration – beneficial bacteria – to your pond. These hungry creatures gobble through nutrients, breaking down fish waste, leaves and other organics that accumulate in the pond. One product to try is called DefensePAC® by Pond Logic®. It’s a combination of five products that provide beneficial bacteria, trace minerals, and a fish and plant-safe pond cleaner.

No pond will ever be completely algae-free, but the key to keeping the green stuff under control is to limit its food supply. Like any other living thing, if it can’t eat, it can’t survive!

POND TALK: When was your worst algae bloom, and how did you correct it?

How Do I Combat String Algae in my Water Feature? – Water Feature Q & A

Picture of String Algae

Water Feature Q & A

Q: I have a 1,000 gallon pond and already the string algae is starting. I am sick of constantly cleaning it. Any ideas? – Steve of New York

A: Like Steve many of you find yourselves in this same situation, where it seems like you are battling algae year after year with no end in sight. The thing I want you to know is that in order to fully understand how to control algae, you really have to understand how it develops in the first place.

The Key Ingredient:
One of the key ingredients for algae to grow is a food source (aka Nitrates). And I’ll have to say in almost every water feature that has a bad algae problem, it is the abundant fish load that is causing the issue. So why does an abundant fish load cause algae? When fish eat they over time, like every living creature, will have to excrete the waste (aka ammonia). This ammonia, when filtered properly, will breakdown into nitrates (aka food source). Make sense so far? This food source is then eaten by algae. From there some of the algae will be eaten by the fish and thus the cycle, the nitrogen cycle of life, begins again.

So the bottom line here is: If we have control of the food source (aka Nitrates), we have control of the algae. I have mentioned this before in the past, but it bears repeating.

Keep Fish Loads to a Minimum:
I know you love your fish and this is a touchy subject. But if you plan to have sixty 12″ koi in a 1,000 gallon pond, your going to have an algae problem and it won’t be inexpensive to get a hold of. When calculating your fish load think of it in pounds of fish or total inches. For example, one 6” fish can weigh as much as four 4” fish. The number of fish will affect the overall fish load, although 10 small fish may only produce the waste of one large fish. With this said, remember that your fish are growing and in many cases multiplying. Always plan for the future and be careful not to overstock your water feature.

Proper Filtration:
The size and type of your filtration system will depend on your total fish load. If your filter is not properly sized for max potential, your fish will outgrow the filter. When this happens, ammonia levels can reach to lethal levels. In most cases filters on the market are rated for ponds containing no fish or a minimal fish load. It is always best to get a filter that is rated for at least 2x the water volume of your pond.

Aquatic Plants:
Aquatic plants and algae will compete for the same food source in order to grow. I don’t know about you, but I would much rather see a few beautiful water liles then green slime. A simple rule of thumb is to have 60% plant coverage. This should consist of submerged, floating and marginal plants. Floating plants, such as Water Hyacinths & Water Lettuce, are fantastic at pulling nitrates from the water. I recommend putting a few into your waterfall filter box if you have one. Rooted plants, such as water lilies and marginal plants, create a great place for your fish to hide from predators. Please note when aquatic plants are not present, algae will take their place. See our selection of aquatic plants here.

Beneficial Natural Bacteria :
I’m sure you hear this a lot nowadays as to why you should be adding beneficial natural bacteria to your water feature. The reason is because it is another reducer of nitrates. One  product to check out for this is called the DefensePAC®. It is a combination of five products that provide beneficial bacteria, trace minerals, and a fish and plant safe pond cleaner. The DefensePAC® works to breakdown fish waste, leaves or other organics that accumulate in the pond. These are essential to maintain a clean, clear and healthy ecosystem. The best of all, one DefensePAC® lasts up to 6 months for a 2,000 gallon water feature.

Season-Long Control with the DefensePAC® – Water Garden Q & A

DefensePAC® - Treats up to a 2,000 gallon water garden for 6 months

Q: There are so many different products on the market and I don’t know what to use. The other day I tried something new for green water and had some of my fish die. I don’t even know if what I am using is fish safe? I want my pond clear although I have plants and do not want to harm any more fish. Is this possible? – William of Ohio

A: We know exactly how you feel. It seems whenever you look on store shelves or search online there is an overwhelming selection of water garden products that can confuse even the most seasoned pond guy or gal. Well, I think I have your answer with one easy-to-use product called the DefensePAC® by PondLogic®. The DefensePAC® is not only a customer favorite but it has won the Green Thumb Award and was awarded the Member Tested Seal of Approval from the National Gardening Association. The DefensePAC® consist of the following:

Oxy-Lift™ Defense® – The Pond Cleaner: Sprinkle over areas affected with debris and this pond cleaner will simply”lift” and detach these debris from rocks, streams and waterfalls. Use as needed to make cleaning a breeze.

Nature’s Defense® – The Pond Balancer: This natural bacteria is designed to go to work to break down organics in your water garden. These organics, if left alone, are a food resource for algae. Comes in an easy-to-use water soluble packet that you just toss in. We suggest using Nature’s Defense® every two weeks throughout the season when water temperatures are above 50° Fahrenheit.

Clarity Defense® – The Pond Clarifier: This product is very unique and will do quite a bit to help your pond along. Clarity Defense® will lock up excess nutrients making them unavailable as a food source for algae as well as settle suspended particulates out of the water column to clear the water. It will also stimulate natural bacteria growth and buffer pH levels.

Muck Defense® – The Muck Reducer: This natural bacteria accelerates the decomposition of organic matter caused from rotting leaves, algae and fish waste. This is great for water gardens that were constructed with rocks and gravel that are difficult to vacuum. Comes in a tablet that sinks to the water garden’s bottom to go to work immediately. We suggest using once every 4 weeks throughout the season when water temperatures are above 50° Fahrenheit.

Seasonal Defense® – The Autumn, Winter & Spring Prep: For the cooler months of the year, this cool temperature natural bacteria will work to decompose leaves, scum and other sediment that accumulate during the fall and winter months. It is best when used during late fall and early Spring. In the Spring, Seasonal Defense will replenish winter bacteria loss to help jump start your filters. Comes in an easy-to-use water soluble packet. Use Seasonal Defense® every week for 4 weeks in late fall and in the early Spring.

The DefensePAC® is a great way to keep your water garden, clean, clear and healthy. Its safe for people, pets, fish & wildlife. It is very easy to use and is satisfaction guaranteed. This package will treat a 2,000 gallon water garden for up to 6 months. Don’t forget all Pond Logic® products are satisfaction guaranteed.

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