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When can I start treating the floating algae in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

When can I start treating the floating algae in my pond?

Q: When can I start treating the floating algae in my pond?

Alex – East Earl, PA

A: The magic number you’re looking for is 60—a water temperature of 60° Fahrenheit, that is. Chemicals that treat algae aren’t very effective at temperatures below that, and so the time to start attacking the green growth is when your underwater thermometer reads higher than 60°.

Once your lake water is warm enough, you can start treating floating algae with a chemical of choice depending on your pond’s situation:

  • If You Have Submerged Algae: Granular products, such as Applied Biochemists Cutrine®-Plus Granular Algaecide, work well for algae submerged deep in your pond or lake, such as Chara. It’s best distributed on a calm day via a granular spreader in the morning before mats form.
  • If You Have Surface or Perimeter Algae: Fast-acting liquid spray, such as Pond Logic® Algae Defense® Algaecide with Treatment Booster™ PLUS, effectively treats algae floating around the perimeter of your pond. Simply spray it on with a pressurized sprayer to combat floating and bottom-growing algae.

Once the algae is dead, remove it as soon as possible with a pond skimmer, such as The Pond Guy® PondSkim™ Debris Skimmer, or a lake rake, like Pond Logic® Pond Rake & Weed Cutter. By removing the dead growth, you prevent the organic muck material from accumulating along the pond bottom and feeding future algae blooms throughout the season.

If water temps are below 60, practice some patience. You’ll have to wait until your lake’s water warms before you can battle the green menace with chemicals. If your algae situation is already excessive, however, get out your rake and start removing some of those mats until you can nuke them with chemicals.

Pond Talk: How much algae growth have you had so far this year?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS

How Do I Tell Chara & Naiad Apart? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

How Do I Tell Chara & Naiad Apart?

Thomas – Williamston, MI

It’s very important to be able to tell Chara and Naiad apart. Why? Because Chara is actually a form of algae and you must use an algaecide, like Algae Defense or Cutrine®-Plus, to treat it. Naiad, which looks similar to Chara, is an aquatic weed and you should use an herbicide, like Pond Logic® PondWeed Defense®, to treat it.
A couple of things to look for to help you differentiate between the two pond nuisances:

• Chara lacks true leaves because it is algae. Instead, it has 6 to 16 leaf-like branchlets that grow in spirals (whorls) around the stem. These branchlets often have tiny, thorn-like projections.
• Naiad has dark-green to greenish-purple, ribbon-like leaves. Naiad leaves are arranged oppositely on the stem, or sometimes in whorls of 3.
• Chara has no defined root system
• Naiad has a well-established root system
• Chara gets a foul, musky, almost garlic-like odor late in the season

If you are still unsure what type of plant you are dealing with, consider applying Hydrothol 191. A granular algaecide/herbicide, Hydrotol 191 is proven to treat both algae AND aquatic weeds but carries a 25 day irrigation & 3 day fish consumption restriction.

Pond Talk: Have you battled Chara or Naiad in your pond? How did you treat it?

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