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My pond has some filamentous algae growth around the edges. It’s too cold to treat, right? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: My pond has some filamentous algae growth around the edges. It’s too cold to treat, right?

Q: My pond has some filamentous algae growth around the edges. It’s too cold to treat, right?

Jeff – Hanahan, SC

A: Cold-weather algae. It’s the worst. And, unfortunately, you can’t treat it right now because the temperatures are too low. Your pond or lake’s water temps need to be higher than 60°F before you can start treating the green stuff with algaecide.

So until things heat up, you have two options:

  1. Rake It Out: If you can safely access and maneuver around your pond, grab your Pond & Beach Rake and get to work skimming and pulling that filamentous algae out of the water and up onshore.
  2. Add Some Color: Pond Dye will limit the amount of sunshine that reaches the algae. Without enough sun, the algae can’t survive. So toss a Pond Dye water-soluble packet or some liquid concentrate into your pond – and your problem is solved!

Once your water temperatures rise above 50°F, start adding PondClear™ & MuckAway™ to the pond. The beneficial bacteria will clear the water and start breaking down the debris and nutrients that are feeding that troublesome algae.

Pond Talk: How much time do you spend puttering around your pond or lake in the winter?

Protect Your Pond in All Seasons - Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye Quarts

I have a deicer but my pond totally froze over. Help! What do I do? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: I have a de-icer but my pond totally froze over. Help! What do I do?

Q: I have a de-icer but my pond totally froze over. Help! What do I do?

Maggie – Carlisle, PA

A: Sounds like your pond fell victim to the 2014 Polar Vortex! When frigid weather persists for days on end – like those way-below-zero temperatures endured by a large swath of the country earlier this month – a pond can completely freeze over, even if a higher-watt de-icer and aerator are used. The ice-melting combination works great in most scenarios, but it just can’t keep up in extreme conditions.

If your pond has been totally frozen over for a day or so, your fish will be fine. But if it has been more than a few days, your pond pals could be at risk of oxygen deprivation or overexposure to dangerous gases trapped beneath the ice.

So what do you do?

Let’s start with what not to do – and that’s to try to smash the ice with a chisel or blunt object. The sound and vibration of that pounding on the ice amplify underwater, which can stress out your fish. They’re already unhappy, and so you certainly don’t want to make them endure more trauma!

Instead, use a pot of hot water to melt away the ice. If it’s particularly thick, you might need to repeat the process several times to open a complete hole in the frozen stuff. While the temperatures remain frigid, check on the pond every few days to make sure the hole is still open; if it freezes over again, use hot water to open the hole back up.

With another two-plus months of winter ahead of us, it’s not too late to add a de-icer to your pond if you don’t already have one. Simply place a unit, like the K&H Thermo-Pond De-Icer, on the ice and turn it on. It will heat up and melt through the ice – as long as temperatures aren’t too extreme!

Pond Talk: How did your pond fare during these extreme frigid January temperatures?

The Ultimate in Winter Pond Protection - PondAir™ & Thermo-Pond Combo

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