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What do I need to do to perform a spring cleanout? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

What do I need to do to perform a spring cleanout?

Q: What do I need to do to perform a spring cleanout?

Christine – Ballston Spa, NY

A: Like it or not, deep cleaning your pond or water feature is one of those must-do chores in the spring. Though we could write an entire e-book on the subject, we’ve distilled the essentials into this handy step-by-step to-do list.

So pull on your waders and gloves. It’s time to get dirty!

1. Create a holding tank for your fish. First, fill a blue tub, large plastic bin or even a child’s wading pool with existing pond water, install a small aerator in it and turn the air on. Then, use a net to catch your fish and gently move them into the holding tank and cover with a net to prevent them from hopping out. This will be their home away from home while you’re performing your cleanout.

2. Drain the pond. Use a pump and a drain hose to siphon all the water from the pond.

3. Get out the power washer. Once all the water has been drained, power wash your pond’s rocks, decor—anything that has developed a layer of dead algae and/or accumulated debris. Scrub away stubborn debris with an oxygen-based cleaner like Pond Logic® Oxy-Lift™ Defense® Pond Cleaner.

4. Rinse, drain and repeat. As you power-wash off the debris and rinse the rocks and decor, pump the dirty water out of the pond. This may need to be repeated a few times, depending on how much gunk has accumulated.

5. Make rock, decor adjustments. With your rocks and decor sparkling clean, now is the time to adjust them and make sure they’re still solidly in place. This is also a perfect opportunity to add more rocks if your gravel-bottom pond needs them.

6. Check pond lights, thin plants. In addition to adjusting your rocks, you should also take the opportunity to ensure your pond lights are working properly, and your plants are thinned and positioned on shelves as you want them.

7. Clean out and reinstall pump/UV/filter. Once your pond is thoroughly cleaned out, re-install any plumbing that was removed for the winter, such as your pump, aerator, filter and ultraviolet light (it’s a great idea to invest in a new UV bulb at this time, too, as we recommend replacing it once a year).

8. Fill ‘er up. Refill your pond with water and add necessary water treatments. If you have hard water or city water, add a conditioner like Pond Logic® Water Conditioner; if your water is still slightly murky, add some Pond Logic® Clarity Defense®.

9. Re-acclimate the fish. Finally, prepare your fish for their newly cleaned home by adding some of the new water to their holding tank so they can adjust to the new water chemistry. Be sure to slowly acclimate the fish back to the pond just as you would when first adding them. To help them over the hump, consider adding some Pond Logic® Fish Stress Reducer PLUS to make the transition smooth for your finned friends.

Take some time this spring to give your pond a good deep cleaning. It’ll take some work—but your pristine, well-cared-for water feature will be a fantastic reward, particularly when you’re lounging by it this summer!

Pond Talk: Share some spring cleaning tips that have worked well in your pond!

Lift Debris Away In Seconds - Pond Logic® Oxy-Lift™ Defense®

I still have dead cattails standing from last year. Should I cut them down? | Pond & Lakes Q&A

I still have dead cattails standing from last year. Should I cut them down?

I still have dead cattails standing from last year. Should I cut them down?

Josh – Canton, OH

It seems not even the harsh winter winds and giant piles of snow are a match for cattails growing around your pond. After a much awaited spring thaw you may still see dead cattail reeds standing tall for all to see. Nobody wants an abundance of aquatic weeds overtaking their pond so will managing those existing cattails help you maintain your pond this season?

Cattails left in your pond throughout the season will begin to go into a state of dormancy as we head into winter. While the reed or stalk of the cattail browns out and dies the rhizome, or roots, will become inactive underground until next season. At this time the dead stalks remaining above ground will begin to decompose and add muck to the pond if not removed. To remove these dead cattails from your pond you will want to use management tools like the Weed Eradicator to cut through tough cattail reeds with ease and then use the pond rake to rake them away from the pond. Raking this debris out of the pond before it decays and turns into muck will save you the hassle of rampant algae blooms and weed growth later in the season. If you do notice an abundance of submerged debris and muck in your pond you can start using MuckAway™ or PondClear™ bacteria to help clean the pond once your water temperatures are stably around 50 degrees.

With old stalks cleared from the pond it will be easier to address any new growth that may begin in the spring. Once the cattails begin to show signs of new growth of at least 18” you can begin further treatment. To control active cattails use products like Avocet® PLX as it is absorbed by the cattail reed and delivered directly to the rhizome killing the entire plant. Once the cattail reed has become inactive and brown it will no longer act like a transport system for chemical treatments rendering them ineffective and these stalks can be cut down as well.

Not all cattail growth is bad and many pond owners use cattails to provide shade for their pond, privacy, prevent soil erosion, create fish habitat and some people even cook and eat them. If you choose to leave areas of your pond more natural make sure you mark boundaries along your shoreline to ensure you can monitor the spread of your cattails and control them as necessary.

Pond Talk: Do you leave some cattails in your pond? What do you use them for?

Clean your shorline with the weed raker and weed eradicator

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