• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

My grandkids hate going into the water by our beach because of the muck. What can I do to get rid of it?– Ponds & Lakes Q & A

Q: My grandkids hate going into the water by our beach because of the muck. What can I do to get rid of it?

Q: My grandkids hate going into the water by our beach because of the muck. What can I do to get rid of it?

Gerhard – Dallas, TX

A: There are few things nastier than stepping into a cool, refreshing lake on a hot summer day – only to feel that slimy goo squish between your toes and suction off your favorite flip-flops.

Pond muck is gross, it’s smelly and it’s no fun. That yucky muck is made up of fish waste, decaying plants and other organic materials that accumulate at the bottom of your pond. Over time, the sludge can build to be inches or more thick. Don’t worry: Get rid of it with a one-two punch of beneficial bacteria and aeration.

Bacteria to the Rescue

Microorganisms are busy little critters. Billions of beneficial bacteria already live in your pond and work hard to break down pond muck, but it sounds like they’re overworked and outnumbered. You can boost their numbers with regular doses of MuckAway™. The pelleted product sinks to the bottom – where you need it most – and starts working to gobble through the muck. MuckAway™ works well in areas that experience high water flow, like canals, beaches and lakefront property.

When applied consistently once every two weeks when water temperatures are above 50º F and used with a bottom-diffused aeration system, MuckAway™ can break down up to 5 inches of pond muck per year. That’s some serious sludge digestion! It may not solve your grandkids’ yucky muck dilemma this year, but you’ll definitely see an improvement by this time next year.

Circulate and Aerate

Like every living creature on earth, the beneficial bacteria in your lake needs oxygen to thrive, and that’s where aeration and circulation come into play.

Aeration prevents thermocline, which is when the water column stagnates and forms layers. The upper portion of the body of water that’s exposed to air contains oxygen while the deeper areas lack oxygen – which is where your beneficial bacteria live (or are struggling to survive!). Implementing an Airmax® Aeration System will circulate the contents of your pond and infuse the entire water column with oxygen. This influx in oxygen helps beneficial bacteria flourish and feed on all that accumulated organic debris.

Short-Term Solution

For your grandkids’ enjoyment on the beach this summer, you can remove some of the pond muck with a Pond & Beach Rake and a bucket or wheelbarrow. But definitely make plans to treat your beach area with MuckAway™ and install an aeration system so you’re all ready for fun in the sun next year.

Pond Talk: If you’ve manually removed muck from your pond or lake, what do you do with it?

Naturally Eliminate Pond Muck - Pond Logic® MuckAway™

Why are my koi chasing each other? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Why are my koi chasing each other?

Why are my koi chasing each other? Christie – Moline, IL

The Thrill of the Chase

Just like any other pet, Koi provide pond guys and gals everywhere with entertainment and companionship. So now your new found finned friends are chasing each other around and being rather aggressive towards each other. This violent activity may seem disturbing to us but for your Koi it is actually a natural process. No your fish have not transformed your water garden in their very own fight club; this is their way of courting each other.

With Friends Like You…

So nothing says love like bashing your partner into a few plants and rocks right? What you are seeing is the male Koi(s) chasing the female around the pond trying to push the eggs out of her by pinching her between rocks or other males. It is during this process that the eggs are released into the water and fertilized. While we may have been a little slow to realize love is in the air … or in your pond rather, there are still a few things you can do to help your Koi have a successful spawning season.

Bring On The Plants: Adding Aquatic Plants like Hornwort and Water Hyacinth in your pond will provide excellent surface area for freshly laid eggs to attach to and will also provide coverage for them.

Keep It Clean: It is important that you keep the water in your pond clean and free from disease while the fry are developing. Perform regular water changes and use Pond & Fish Conditioner when adding new water to remove any chlorine and toxic heavy metals from your tap or well water. Make sure you are adding Pond Salt to the water to keep fish stress down and also help prevent diseases.

Survival of the fittest…

After the fry hatch, you may not see the new additions until they become big enough to fend for themselves. Once they hatch they hide and fight for survival. Koi are not loving parents, they tend to eat their own eggs and fry. Out of thousands of eggs koi lay, only a select few will survive.

As your new additions began to grow, there will be added ammonia and nitrates in the pond. If you plan to keep these new Koi make sure you are providing adequate Filtration in your pond and you are not deviating from a practical fish load for your size pond. Having more fish in your pond than your filtration can handle will lead to additional more severe algae blooms and muck accumulation. It is important that you keep adding beneficial bacteria such as Nature’s Defense or Muck Defense to break this waste down.

Pond Talk: Have you seen baby koi in your water garden?

Pond Logic® Pond Salt

What is This Black Mucky Stuff on the Bottom of My Pond & How Do I Get Rid of It? – Pond & Lake Q & A

Muck Boots Stepping in Muck

Q: What is this black mucky stuff on the bottom of my pond and how do I get rid of it? - Several Customers

A: Over time, organics such as leaves, aquatic weeds or twigs fall into the pond and settle on the bottom. These organics slowly begin to decay and will create a mucky layer on the bottom of your pond. As time passes, this muck layer will get thicker and thicker. Before you know it, you’ll step into your pond and sink a foot down in muck. Muck is also a food source for algae and pond weeds. As the muck layer grows, so will your problems with algae and pond weeds. So how do we combat muck? Below are a few suggestions:

The best way to combat muck is to use a beneficial, natural bacteria called MuckAway™. PMuckAway™ is an aerobic bacteria that instantly activates when put into water and will eat away the muck at an accelerated rate. When used with aeration, you can see up to 3-5″ dissipate per year.

Just remember, any organic matter that goes into your pond will create more muck. The more muck, the more food source for algae and pond weeds. Finding ways to reduce the amount of organics going into your pond is a must. For instance, cutting your grass away from the pond, instead of directly in it or removing twigs and tree branches that have fallen into the pond using a Pond & Beach Rake.

One more way to reduce muck is to use a bottom bubbler aeration system. Aerobic bacteria, like PondClear™, will break down muck at an even faster rate when there is saturated oxygen levels in your pond’s water. Aeration also has many other benefits besides breaking down muck, such as clearing the water column of sediments, reducing the chances of fish kills or turnover and eliminating a pond’s thermocline. (Read more about the benefits of aeration here)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 143 other followers