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Why does my pond sometimes turn green in the spring? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Why does my pond sometimes turn green in the spring?

Q: Why does my pond sometimes turn green in the spring?

Randy – Huntington, WV

A: After a long, dreary winter, the sight of spring’s green shoots and leaves are a welcome sign – but not in your pond. Green water means algae growth, and that’s not something you want to see flourish. Besides being unsightly, algae degrades your water quality and can actually harm your aquatic pets.

So what can you do to prevent your water garden from turning green?

Add Seasonal Defense®: As long as water temperatures are below 50° F, you can add Seasonal Defense® to your pond. It contains aerobic bacteria that are specially designed for cooler water. When used at this time of year, the waste-gobbling microorganisms will break down dead foliage, fish waste and other sediment that fuel algae growth in your pond.

Keep Up on Your Chores: Make sure you also keep up on your spring cleaning chores because all that decomposing debris feeds algae. Regularly check and clean out your skimmer basket, and remove any leaves or large pieces of debris that blow into the pond with your Collapsible Skimmer & Fish Net. This will encourage the beneficial bacteria in Seasonal Defense® to focus their energy on breaking down fine organic material and muck.

Add Barley Straw Extract: All-natural chemicals found in decomposing barley straw help keep your pond’s water crystal clear. If you add Barley Extract, you don’t have to wait for the straw to decompose. Simply add it to your water according to the label’s instructions and enjoy a clean and healthy water feature. For best results, use Barley Extract in conjunction with Seasonal Defense®.

Pond Talk: What upgrades will you be making to your pond or water garden this year?

Replenish Bacteria Loss This Spring- Pond Logic (r) Seasonal Defense(r)

Help! How do I get rid of green water? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Help! How do I get rid of green water?

Q: Help! How do I get rid of green water?

Linda – Gardnerville, NV

A: Nope, there’s nothing nice about a pea soup-colored pond. Just about every water gardener dreams of a clean, crystal-clear pond – not an algae-filled eyesore. During the warmer seasons, what do you do to prevent and get rid of that unsightly green water? By making sure your pond is in balance.

For a stable pond that inhibits algae growth, you have to strike a perfect balance (or close to perfect, anyway) between fishes, aeration and filtration. And to keep it that way, you have to keep it well maintained. Here’s what you need to know to get rid of that green water.

Watch Fish Load, Feeding

Yes, it’s tempting to take home a dozen or more of those tiny koi from your favorite water garden retailer. But remember: those fish will grow and excrete nutrients that feed the algae. The rule of thumb is to allow 1 inch of adult fish per square foot of surface area, so don’t max out your capacity with one impulse buy at the koi store.

Speaking of fish, take it easy with the food. Feed them a quality diet, like Pond Logic® Growth and Color Fish Food, once a day, and give them only what they can gobble down in a few minutes. Anything more than that just adds excess waste to the pond – which is food for the algae. You can feed your finned friends more often, but be prepared to do more partial water changes or add extra filtration to handle the job.

Add Some Aeration, Bacteria

When you circulate your pond’s water with an aeration system, like the Pond Logic® KoiAir™ Water Garden Aeration System, you deliver oxygen to the bottom where all the muck – a.k.a. algae chow – sits. This oxygen helps all the beneficial bacteria, like Muck Defense® that’s found in the Pond Logic® DefensePAC® Pond Care Package, break down and consume the material there and throughout the water column, resulting in cleaner, clearer water. Plus, the aeration is good for your fish’s health, too.

Filtration – the Bigger, the Better

Go big with your mechanical filtration system. Make sure it’s at least big enough to handle the amount of water in your pond. Manufacturers rate filters for minimal fish load, so if you intend to have a lot of fish, go even bigger.

Plants – floating, submerged, marginals and bog varieties – make excellent natural filtration systems that complement your mechanical and biological filtration. Plants also shade the pond, keeping temperatures cooler and sheltering your fish. So try to cover 40 to 60 percent of your water with plants.

If you still have a pea soup colored pond after getting your fish load right, your feeding routine in check, your aeration system in place and your filtration system humming and growing, it’s time for the big guns – an ultraviolet clarifier. A UV clarifier, like The Pond Guy® PowerUV™ Ultraviolet Clarifier, will help to bind the green water algae so it can be pulled out by your filter.

Keep It Clean, Kind Of

Normal maintenance, like regular partial water changes and debris removal, can go a long way to get rid of excess nutrient buildup. But don’t overdo the filter-cleaning chores. Too much – meaning daily or weekly – washing of the filter media will wear the material down faster and wipe out the beneficial bacteria that actually clean the water. If water is unable to pass through the filter, simply rinse it lightly with water.

And if you don’t already, it’s always a good idea to do an annual spring cleanout of your pond to get rid of organic materials that feed the algae.

Pond Talk: How can you tell when your pond or water garden is out of balance?

Pond Logic® DefensePAC® - 5 Simple Steps To Clear Water

Are Products With Beneficial Bacteria The Same As Products With Enzymes? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Are Products With Beneficial Bacteria The Same As Products With Enzymes?

Are Products With Beneficial Bacteria The Same As Products With Enzymes?

Jeff – Carol Stream, IL

Natural bacteria and enzymes each play a very different role in your pond or lake. Understanding how each item affects your pond will help make selecting the right products easier.

Natural bacteria, like those in PondClear™ and MuckAway™, are microscopic organisms that decompose organic material such as dead algae/weeds, leaves and pond muck. Don’t let the word bacteria scare you, especially when it comes to these natural bacteria additives for ponds. They are completely natural and 100% safe. These aerobic bacteria (bacteria that require oxygen) are preferred for pond applications because they decompose organic material and pond muck at a faster rate than anaerobic bacteria, which do not require oxygen to survive.

Enzymes, on the other hand, are catalysts that aid natural bacteria by speeding up the digestion of dead material. They help ponds by lowering the activation energy needed for natural bacteria to digest dead materials. PondLogic® PondClear™ and MuckAway™ are unique in the fact that they possess the ability to produce their own enzymes unlike other bacteria additives on the market. There is no need to add additional enzymes.

Our recommendation; don’t be fooled by products that focus just on enzymes. Aerobic natural bacteria must already be present in the pond for enzymes to be productive. Instead, stick with PondLogic® aerobic natural bacteria products that produce their own enzymes as this will save you time & money as well as give you the results you want…clear water.

Pond Logic MuckAway

Should I Use Beneficial Bacteria Pond Products In The Winter? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Should I Use Beneficial Bacteria Pond Products In The Winter?Should I Use Beneficial Bacteria Pond Products In The Winter?

Woodrow – Burlington, WI

Most people assume bacteria are a bad thing since they’ve spent most of their lives learning to avoid it. However, bacteria can be extremely beneficial to outdoor ponds, and are even recommended for a healthy and stable pond environment. But what exactly are we referring to when we say “bacteria?”

These helpful bacteria are called aerobic bacteria, and are used to consume organic waste, turning it into an odorless gas which escapes from the pond unnoticed. They are found in both PondClear™ and MuckAway™, which aid in keeping pond water healthy, clear of debris, and fresh smelling.

Products that contain aerobic bacteria work best at temperatures above 50 degrees, which is why you would want to stop adding bacteria during the winter months. In temperatures below 50 degrees, bacteria are not as efficient and therefore are not recommended for use. So save that bacteria for warmer days, and you’ll have a healthy pond clear of unsightly muck and debris.

Pond Talk: Have you seen a reduction in muck using natural bacteria over the summer months?

Pond Logic® MuckAway™

Can I swim in the pond if I add pond dye? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Can I swim in the pond if I add pond dye?

Can I swim in the pond if I add pond dye?
Sarah – Reno, NV

For a lot of good reasons – beyond the fact that blue skin isn’t terribly flattering on anyone – this is a question that begs for an answer. We’ll start with the basics. At the Pond Guy, we sell a variety of pond dyes – including Pond Logic Nature’s Blue, Twilight Blue and Black Dyemond, and Pond Logic Nature’s Blue PLUS and Twilight Blue PLUS which both include bacteria. For the sake of safety, all of the pond dyes we carry are food grade – which ensures that they’re safe for recreational use, including swimming. Because our dyes are food grade, even an accidental slurp of dyed pond water is no cause for concern.

Since our dyes pose no health risks to people or pets, the second line of inquiry about pond dyes usually involves the potential for staining. In its concentrated form, pond dyes will stain pretty much anything. Clothes, skin, pets, rocks – you name it. When you put a lot of dye in one place, it’s bound to leave a mark. But when applied properly in a pond, and permitted to disperse for 24 to 48 hours, dyes pose little to no risk of staining.

In the event that you or your pet come into contact with concentrated dye, there’s no need to worry. Food grade dyes pose no threat to health whatsoever – even in concentrated forms. On the downside, however, it may take a while for you to shed your new hue. Over time, dyes will fade, and your skin – or Rover’s fur – will be back to its natural tint.

Pond Talk: Do you use dye in your pond?

Pond Logic® Nature's Blue™ Pond Dye Plus

What is the difference between adding bacteria and adding enzymes? | Pond & Lakes Q & A

What is the difference between adding bacteria and adding enzymes?

What is the difference between adding bacteria and adding enzymes?
Mario – Albany, NY

When searching for natural water treatments for your pond and lake you may have noticed products advertising beneficial bacteria and some labeled as enzymes, both claiming to produce the same results, a reduction in muck! So just what is the difference between adding bacteria and adding an enzyme?

Bacteria are commonly associated with illness or filth and many people wonder why pond owners are crazy enough to want to add bacteria to our ponds. Bacteria come in a wide variety of flavors and they each have their own unique agenda. Aerobic bacteria used in natural pond treatments like Pond Logic PondClearand MuckAway are the powerhouses behind digesting and removing the organic debris that muck up your pond. While they have little interest in you or your pets, they thrive on material like decomposing plant matter and fish waste, breaking it down into nothing but a natural odorless gas byproduct.

There is always a trace of beneficial bacteria in a natural pond ecosystem. However, there are typically more types of organic waste being introduced to your pond via plants, fish, wildlife and runoff than there are bacteria to digest it. It is this imbalance that causes organic waste to accumulate over time. Applying beneficial bacteria treatments to your pond is a natural way to keep your pond balanced and clean. Enzymes are the catalyst which allows bacteria to break down and digest the debris in your pond. While they don’t actually eradicate waste material from your pond on their own, they take some of the work load off of your bacteria’s proverbial shoulders by saving them the time of having to “prepare” their meal. As beneficial aerobic bacteria are actually capable of creating these enzymes on their own, products that consist of only enzymes can be considered a support tool to help enhance pre-existing pond bacteria, however they will not directly decompose the accumulated muck in your pond.

Adding natural water treatments that contain beneficial aerobic bacteria can keep your pond healthy, balanced and clean throughout the season. Running an aeration system in tandem with your bacteria treatments infuses your pond with oxygen, which is prized by your fish and aerobic bacteria. Maintaining your pond with aeration and natural water treatments that contain natural bacteria is considered a proactive treatment that will provide a quicker path to desired results of a clean and healthy pond.

Pond Talk: Have you used an enzyme product as part of your pond maintenance? Did you notice a difference?

Get clear water naturally with PondClear™ Natural Bacteria!

What is the difference between Pond Dye and Pond Dye Plus? | Pond & Lakes Q & A

What is the difference between Pond Dye and Pond Dye Plus?

What is the difference between Pond Dye and Pond Dye Plus?
Emma – Racine, WI

Adding pond dye to your pond maintenance regimen is a great way to keep your pond looking great all year long. The additional shade gives your pond the unique color of your choosing whether it be a decorative blue tint or a mirror like reflective surface while discouraging unwanted plant and weed growth. Pond Logic makes a new dye called Pond Logic Pond Dye Plus leaving pond owners everywhere wondering what all the “Plus” is about.

Aquatic weeds and algae utilize decomposing organic materials like waste, runoff, dead leaves or plant decay along with sunlight as fuel to grow and overtake your pond. Pond Logic Pond Dye Plus combines the Nature’s Blue or Twilight Blue Pond Dye you’ve grown to love with their powerful PondClear Liquid Bacteria.

The bacteria added to Pond Dye Plus actually digest the mucky organic debris that has built up in your pond. This not only discourages future weed growth but also improves water clarity by removing organic floating debris that cloud up your water. By combining both dye and bacteria in one product you can effectively reduce the time you spend treating your pond, and spend more time enjoying it. PondClear is a natural product and is safe for your fish, pets, birds, wildlife, and of course yourself. The beneficial bacteria in Pond Dye Plus is most effective when your pond can maintain a water temperature of around 50 degrees or higher. If it is still a bit chilly where you live, continue to use just your Pond Dye until later in the season.

If you are new to beneficial bacteria treatments or your pond needs a little help breaking down excessive organic debris, making the upgrade to Pond Logic Pond Dye Plus is a logical choice. If your muck situation is getting entirely out of hand or you are not a fan of using dye in your pond, Pond Logic also offers bacteria treatments without the dye in the form of Pond Logic PondClear and MuckAway.

Pond Talk: Have you tried Pond Dye Plus yet? Share your experience!

Year long pond protection!

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