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I think I spotted some eggs in my pond, do I need to do anything with them? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

I think I spotted some eggs in my pond, do I need to do anything with them?

I think I spotted some eggs in my pond, do I need to do anything with them?
Kathie- Walnut, CA

If you have koi fish in your pond, there’s a distinct possibility you may be right. If you don’t, we may have a mystery on our hands.

For the purposes of identification, koi eggs are about the size of small beads – or small pinheads. Their color can range from milky white to greenish brown, and you’ll often be able to see black dots – which are developing koi eyes – inside them.

Fortunately, by the time you’ve identified the eggs, Mother Nature is already on the job. But, as a good steward to the future koi of America, you might consider adding some Aquatic Plants to the pond to provide good hiding spots for the fry. With everything from floating plants to pond flowers to submerged oxygenating plants, we have plenty of choices to keep your kiddie koi safe from predators – until they’re ready to make it on their own. For an added measure of protection, consider our Koi Shelters, which provide safe havens for koi of all sizes.

Koi eggs generally hatch within a week. So, within a few days from your first sighting, you’ll be graced with an abundance of koi fry. When they’re first hatched, koi fry can’t swim – so they attach themselves to the sides of the pond to grow. Within three or four days, your koi fry will begin to swim.

While it might be tempting to give your fry a welcome feast, there’s no need. During the first stages of their development, your koi will find sufficient natural food in the pond. By the time they’re approximately three to four weeks old, the koi fry should be between ¼” and ½’ long – and they’ll still be capable of finding sufficient natural food in the pond.

After two to three months, your fry will have reached between 2” and 3” in length. They’ll continue to grow until they’re between fifteen and twenty years old – so they’re just getting started. And with an average lifespan of approximately fifty years, you’ll have plenty of time to appreciate your koi, and the generations of offspring they’re sure to produce.

Pond Talk: Have you had the opportunity to see new koi in your pond?

Aquatic Plants

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