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I’ve heard a lot about Clipper Herbicide. What does it do? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I’ve heard a lot about Clipper Herbicide. What does it do?

Eldon – Urbandale, IA

A: Clipper™ Aquatic Herbicide controls a wide variety of algae, floating weeds and submerged weeds, but its claim to fame is its ability to wipe out troublesome watermeal and duckweed—two aquatic weeds that can be difficult to manage in any pond or lake. In fact, when used as directed, up to 80 percent of duckweed and watermeal will be eliminated within the first application of Clipper™. Not too shabby!

Here are some tips for use:

  • Check your pH first: High pH levels will reduce Clipper’s™ effectiveness, so test the pH of your pond’s water with a pH Test Kit before using the herbicide. Apply it only when the pH is 8.5 and below.
  • Apply on a sunny morning: The herbicide is a reactive treatment that works better in the sunlight, so treat your pond or lake early in the morning on a sunny day. Hold off on adding light-blocking Pond Dye to your water, until after Clipper™ has had a chance to go to work on the weeds.
  • Spray and play: Applying Clipper™ to aquatic weeds is easy. Simply mix the amount of Clipper™ and water in a Specialty Pond Sprayer according to label instructions, and spray onto floating weeds and algae or place the tip beneath the water’s surface to treat submerged weeds. Over time, the weeds will begin to brown and die.
  • A little goes a long way: You only need to use 1 pound of Clipper™ per surface acre one to two times per year. Because it’s a contact herbicide, complete coverage is essential for effective control. You can reapply Clipper™ after 28 days if you find that you’ve missed some weed patches after the first treatment.
  • No temperature restrictions: Clipper™ can be used year-round in any temperature, but it should be applied only when the weeds are actively growing.
  • Rake away the debris: Once the aquatic weeds are completely dead, use a rake—like the Pond & Beach Rake —to remove the debris. This will prevent the foliage from accumulating and turning into algae-feeding muck.

Clipper™ Aquatic Herbicide can be used in a range of waterways, including bayous, canals, drainage ditches, lakes, marshes, freshwater ponds and reservoirs. It quickly and effectively controls watermeal, duckweed, water lettuce, giant salvinia, cabomba, Eurasian watermilfoil, hydrilla and curlyleaf pondweed. If you fight aquatic weeds in your lake or pond, consider using Clipper™. It’s good stuff!

Pond Talk: Have you tried Clipper™ in your pond or lake? If so, tell us how it worked for you.

The Pond Guy(r) Promote Fish Growth This Season - The Pond Guy(r) Game Fish Grower

The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Sharon – Waynesboro, GA

A: Inside your ClearPAC® PLUS box, you’ll find everything you need to keep your lake clean and clear this spring and summer. The five components, when used as directed, address the root of the most common pond problems by tackling excess nutrients and shielding the water from algae-feeding sunlight.
When should you start using ClearPAC® PLUS? It all depends on your water temperature. Let’s take a closer look at when and how to best use the products in your super-pack.

  • Pond Dye: As soon as the ice melts on your pond or lake, add your Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye. The dye is not temperature-sensitive so it can be used even when water temps are too cold for beneficial bacteria products. Pond Dye does more than color your water and add to your landscape’s aesthetic; it also shades it from sunlight, which can kick-start algae blooms as the mercury rises.
  • PondClear™ and MuckAway™: When water temperatures rise to a consistent 50°F, you can start using the beneficial bacteria found in PondClear™ and MuckAway™ to break down nutrients suspended in your water column and muck on the bottom of your pond. These products can be used at the same time as your Pond Dye and EcoBoost™.
  • EcoBoost™: This bacteria booster that has no temperature restrictions, so it can be used year-round to bind phosphates that find their way into your pond or lake. You can use EcoBoost™ throughout the spring to give you a head start on pond season.
  • Algae Defense® : To be used only as needed, this algae-destroyer treats troublesome floating filamentous algae, bottom growing chara and the planktonic algae when it’s green and growing. Use Algae Defense® when the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60°F. Don’t use Algae Defense® if you keep koi or trout in your lake.

After treating your pond with ClearPAC® PLUS, don’t forget to remove dead algae and debris with your Pond & Beach Rake. Doing so will remove the decaying vegetation and prevent them from feeding the algae—which will ultimately help your Pond Dye, PondClear™, MuckAway™, EcoBoost™ and Algae Defense® work even better!

Pond Talk: Has spring sprung in your area of the country?

Keep Your Pond Clean and Clear - Pond Logic(r) ClearPAC® PLUS

How do I know if my filtration system is adequate for my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: How do I know if my filtration system is adequate for my pond?

Q: How do I know if my filtration system is adequate for my pond?

Roger – Grayson, GA

A: Clean, clear water is a must-have in any water feature. It allows you to see those gorgeous koi and goldfish swimming below the surface. It shows that you have excellent water quality, with plenty of oxygen for your pond’s inhabitants—including the microscopic ones, like beneficial bacteria. And it puts off no offensive odors, which means you can host shindigs by your water garden without scaring off your friends.

When your water quality is suffering, your pond is telling you that your filtration isn’t up to par. Here are four clear signs that say you need to kick it up a notch.

  1. Algae Blooms, Clarity Concerns: If you have a filtration system in place but you still have water clarity issues and algae blooms, that’s an obvious indicator that you need an upgrade. When selecting a more powerful filtration system, like our AllClear™ PLUS Pressurized Filters with a built-in ultraviolet clarifier, make sure it’s sized appropriately for your pond and its nutrient load.
  2. Fish Frenzy: If your pond’s resident fish have multiplied and grown over the years, then you’re likely overdue for a more powerful filter system. Most filter systems are marketed for a minimal fish load, so too many fish producing waste will overload the system. Remember: The rule is to allow 1 inch of adult fish per square foot of surface area. If you have too many koi or goldfish in your pond, you should think about finding new homes for some of your finned friends or increasing your filtration.
  3. Toxic Test Results: Test your pond’s water with one of our Master Test Kits to find out what your ammonia, nitrite and phosphate levels are. If you see high ammonia levels or if your fishes’ health has been suffering, the pond lacks proper filtration.
  4. Foamy Falls: Have you seen foam build up at the base of your waterfall or stream? All that frothiness, which is caused by excess protein and oil excreted by fish and other pond dwellers, can be a sign of excessive nutrient levels caused by inadequate filtration. A higher-powered filter system can help remove and dissipate that foam.

If you have a waterfall filter box, you can easily boost your filtration system’s water-cleaning power by adding Matala® Filter Pads. With four different densities—low, medium, high and super high—you can mix and match them to suit your pond’s unique needs.

Pond Talk: What telltale sign told you that it was time to increase your filtration system?

3 Types of Filtration, 1 Powerful Unit - Pond Logic (r) AllClear(t) PLUS Pressurized Filters

Top Blog Posts of 2013

As 2013 comes to a close, we sit back and look at all the amazing things that happened this year. We thank you, our wonderful customers, for a great year. Below are our Top Blogs for 2013! Your interest in our products and your thirst for pond knowledge truly makes us thankful to have you as a customer. We aim to give you the knowledge and products you need to make your pond great. As always, if you have questions or comments, please feel to send them our way! 
We wish you a safe and happy 2014.
From The Pond Guy® Staff

Top 5 Blog Posts in Pond & Lake

Top Blog Posts of 2013 - Pond & Lake

Q: After a really warm day, I have algae floating on my pond. How do I control it?

Q: After getting out of my swimming pond, I had a leech on my leg! How do I remove leeches from my pond?
Q: I see predator control options for geese and swans, but what about options for other animals, like raccoons?
Q: My fish population is growing rapidly, but how do I know if my fish population is balanced?
Q: How do I know if my pond is covered in pollen or algae?

Top 5 Blog Posts in Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens

Top Blog Posts of 2013 - Water Garden

Q: What do I need to do to perform a spring cleanout?

Q: How do I treat my pond fish for ich and other diseases?

Q: My water turned brown about this time last year. How do I stop it from happening again?

Q: My fish are looking for food. Can I feed them now? If so, what kind of food do I give them?

Q: My stream is already accumulating algae! Is there anything I can use to help clean it up?

Happy New Year from The Pond Guy(r)

When should I stop treating algae? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When should I stop treating algae?

Q: When should I stop treating algae?

Rich – Bartlesville, OK

A: It’s not so much a matter of when as it is what temperature your water is.

In theory, with the right equipment, algae can be managed all year-long. But if you want to treat it with chemicals, the water temperature in your lake needs to above 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The active ingredients in Pond Logic® Algae Defense® that are used to control suspended, floating and bottom-of-the-pond algae require warmer water temperatures to work properly.

So when your water temperature is below 60°F, you’re out of luck for using chemical treatments.

Before cooler temperatures chill your water this fall, give any planktonic algae, filamentous algae or chara growing in your pond a dose of Algae Defense®. The best time to apply the fast-acting formula is in the morning on a calm, sunny day. Simply mix with water and spray directly onto algae with a pressurized sprayer. Once the green stuff is dead, don’t forget to remove it with the Pond & Beach Rake to prevent an accumulation of dead algae and muck.

So what do you do if you’re hosting a Halloween party but the water temperature in your pond—filled with spooky, pea green masses—is lower than 60°F? Try clearing things up with The Pond Guy® PondSkim™. Measuring 5 feet wide and constructed with a super tough screen, the skimmer floats on the water surface and collects floating algae as you pull it along with your boat. Problem solved!

Pond Talk: How do you manage late-season algae blooms in your pond or lake?

Quickly Kill Late Season Algae - Pond Logic(r) Algae Defense(r)

Is it too cold to treat my algae blooms? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Is it too cold to treat my algae blooms?

Q: Is it too cold to treat my algae blooms?

Ashley – Cross Junction, VA

A: The bane of pond keepers, algae—be it planktonic pea soup, filamentous pond scum or bottom-dwelling chara—can be treated any time of year, as long as the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

But what’s so special about the magical 60-degree temp?

Though algae will grow at temperatures lower than that, the chemicals in both Pond Logic® Algae Defense & Cide-Kick Combo and Applied Biochemists Cutrine®-Plus Granular Algaecide that are used to control suspended, floating and bottom-of-the-pond algae require warmer water temperatures to work properly.

If you’re unsure of your lake’s water temperature, use a pond thermometer, like the Pond Logic® Floating Pond Thermometer, to get a fast and accurate reading.

Here are three more tips for treating fall algae blooms:

1. Heavier doses may be required: When treating well-established algae or algae that has grown later in the season, you may need to up your dosage rates to get the same effect as when treating fresh algae or algae that has sprung up in the spring. Read the product’s label for safe usage guidelines.

2. Use the right product: Pond Logic® Algae Defense & Cide-Kick Combo will take a serious toll on planktonic, filamentous and chara growth, but Applied Biochemists Cutrine®-Plus Granular Algaecide works especially well on chara. Well-established chara will build up a chalky deposit, which gives it super powers against chemical treatments. But the Cutrine-Plus granules sink to the bottom of the pond and dissipate right where that nuisance algae resides.

3. Watch the weather: The best time to apply Algae Defense and Cutrine-Plus Granular is in the morning on a calm, sunny day. For the Algae Defense, simply mix with water and spray with a pressurized sprayer; for the Cutrine-Plus Granular, broadcast the granules in the area that needs to be treated.

Once the water temperature dips below 60 degrees Fahrenheit, you’re out of luck when it comes to treating algae blooms. But you can revel in the fact that they will slow down when the water reaches 50 degrees or so—only to emerge again come spring!

Pond Talk: What do you do to treat fall algae blooms in your pond or lake?

Pond Logic® Algae Defense® - Quickly Eliminate Pond Algae

Why can’t I treat my pond with the common weed killer I use around my yard? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Why can’t I treat my pond with the common weed killer I use around my yard?

Q: Why can’t I treat my pond with the common weed killer I use around my yard?

Duane – Spring Grove, PA

A: It may seem like a convenience and a cost savings to use your terrestrial weed herbicides to treat weeds in your pond or lake. But when it comes to managing nuisance growth in and around your pond, not all chemicals are created equally.

Though broad-spectrum-use herbicides like diuron work great on grassy terrestrial weeds, they’re not approved for use on cattails and water milfoil because of the direct contact with public waterways or possibility of leaching into drinking/ground water. Instead, you need to use products that are registered by the Environmental Protection Agency for aquatic use, like Pond Logic® Algae Defense®, PondWeed Defense® and Avocet® PLX aquatic herbicides.

Why the regulations? Read on for details.

Environmental Protection

The EPA registers products like herbicides for aquatic use to protect the environment. Its goal is to minimize harm while maximizing results.

The government agency tests the ingredients’ concentration, frequency of use and effectiveness for their short-term and long-term effects in their intended environment. It also checks the chemicals’ half life, which is how long the substances remain in the environment before breaking down enough to be considered non-toxic.

Safer for Your Pond Visitors

If you use unapproved chemicals in your pond or lake, you could be doing harm to not only the ecosystem but also to your fish, your livestock and wildlife, your soil and, most importantly, to yourself, your family and your neighbors.

Herbicides that have been approved by the EPA include specific restrictions and precautions on their labels about consuming fish after treating bodies of water. They caution against swimming in or drinking from treated ponds within a certain amount of time after application. They even warn of soil contamination issues that landowners or pond professionals should be aware of.

Chemicals that are not approved for aquatic use have none of these warnings because they have not been tested for their effects on the pond habitat. In fact, some products can actually be considered a contaminant to the aquatic environment – and you don’t want that, right?

Obey the EPA

Even if you don’t consume your game fish, swim in your lake or drink the water, you should steer clear of unapproved chemicals. Some of them can leach into the soil surrounding the pond or be released during heavy rains when ponds flood. That runoff – including the potentially toxic chemicals – can then be released into the public waterways or wetlands used by neighbors.

Play it safe. Obey the EPA.

Pond Talk: What do you think of the EPA’s regulation of aquatic herbicides?

Pond Logic PondWeed Defense - Eliminate Aquatic Weeds

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