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The string algae seems to grow in just a few hours in my stream. What can I do? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: The string algae seems to grow in just a few hours in my stream. What can I do?

Q: The string algae seems to grow in just a few hours in my stream. What can I do?

Edith – Marion, IN

A: String algae. It seems to just grow and grow, leaving a tangled mess of green slimy stuff in your stream and water garden. Like other types of algae, string algae thrives on sunlight and excess nutrients like fish waste and decomposing organic matter in the water. If you want to get rid of it, check out this five-step plan designed to get your string algae problem under control.

  • Add Plants: Water lilies, water hyacinth, water lettuce and other floating aquatic plants look much nicer than algae, right? These ornamental plants will compete for the food source algae uses for growth, so plant away! A simple rule of thumb is to have 60 percent of your pond covered with submerged, floating and marginal plants.
  • Ration Fish Food: Those pellets and sticks are necessary to feed your finned friends, but keep in mind that fish food adds nutrients to the water in two ways: as wasted food that the fish don’t eat, and as waste after the fish digest it. Monitor how much your fish actually eat and cut back if possible.
  • Pump Up Filtration: If your filtration system isn’t powerful enough to handle your pond’s total fish load, you’ll wind up with burgeoning algae growth and, in worst-case scenarios, lethal levels of ammonia – neither of which you want. Many filters on the market are rated for ponds containing no fish or minimal fish, so get a filter that is rated for at least two times the water volume of your pond.
  • Turn Up Aeration: Beneficial bacteria, like those found in the DefensePAC®, naturally break down fish waste, but they need oxygen to thrive and reproduce. By adding a PondAir™ Aeration System, you’ll boost the oxygen in the water, increase your bacteria levels and reduce the nutrient load, thereby reducing algae growth.
  • Use Oxy-Lift Defense: As needed throughout the season, use Oxy-Lift™ Defense® to lift string algae from waterfalls, streams and rocks. Simply shut down your waterfall, sprinkle the powder directly onto debris-covered areas and watch it instantly start foaming. In 24 hours, it will have removed the algae. Be sure to pull out any debris with a pond net.

String algae may seem like a never-ending battle, but you can manage it with these tried-and-true methods. Good luck!

Pond Talk: How often do you need to scrub string algae from your waterfall or stream?

Lift Debris From Waterfalls Instantly - Pond Logic (r) Oxy-Lift(t) Defense (r)

My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it?

Q: My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it?

C.J.- Dumas, AR

A: With summer temperatures settling in, algae blooms are coming out swinging. Bright sunshine and warm temperatures trigger green growth, so it’s critical to keep floating and submerged algae in check before it grows out of control.

For the health of your pond and its inhabitants, keeping algae blooms to a minimum is necessary. Here’s an approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over:

Treat the Growth
First, use an algaecide to great rid of the algae bloom. You can treat floating algae with a fast-acting liquid spray like Algae Defense® Algaecide with Treatment Booster™ PLUS, which treats floating algae and chara that’s less than 3’ deep. Simply spray it on with a pressurized sprayer to combat floating and bottom-growing algae.

Submerged algae can be treated with sinking granular products, such as Cutrine®-Plus. It works well for algae submerged deep in your pond or lake, such as Chara. It’s best distributed on a calm day via a granular spreader in the morning before mats form.

Remove the Dead Algae
Once the algae is dead, you should remove it. Why? By leaving the dead foliage in the lake, it will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

Use a pond skimmer, like the PondSkim™, or a rake, like the Pond & Beach Rake, to prevent that muck from accumulating.

Add Beneficial Bacteria
Three days after you’ve used algaecides, treat your pond with PondClear™. It contains beneficial bacteria that gobbles through the organic material that’s suspended in the water column. The result is a lake filled with clean, clear, odor-free water—and a healthy ecosystem for your game fish and other pond inhabitants.

Shade Water with Pond Dye
Finally, be sure to add blue or black pond dye to your pond throughout the spring and summer. By reducing the amount of sunlight that shines through the water and stimulates plant growth, you will ultimately reduce the amount of algae.

Pond Talk: How do you keep your algae blooms in check?

Fast Acting Liquid Formula, Eliminate Algae - Pond Logic(r) Algae Defense(r) Algaecide

Isn’t the Waterfall Enough? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Isn’t the Waterfall Enough?

Q: Isn’t the Waterfall Enough?

Staci – Bethel, VT

A: As your waterfall gurgles and churns gallons of water, it would certainly appear that your pond is getting plenty of aeration. All that action does, in fact, help with gas exchange and infuse oxygen into the water. But it isn’t always enough, especially if you run your waterfall pump for a short time during the day.

If a pond isn’t aerated enough, expect to see these telltale signs:

  • Algae Battles: Algae thrive in calm water that’s devoid of – and in need of – oxygen and beneficial bacteria. If you regularly fight algae blooms, that means your pond is out of balance and could use some additional oxygen and movement throughout the entire water column.
  • Oxygen-Starved Fish: Fish that need more O2 will hang out beneath your waterfall, where oxygen supplies are the densest. They may also be coming to the water surface, gulping and gasping for breaths of air because there’s not enough in their environment.
  • Too Many Fish: The general rule for a fish population in a pond is to allow 1 inch of adult fish per square foot of surface area. If you have too many fish, or your existing population has outgrown their space, aeration is critical to their health and well being.
  • Stagnant Water, Mosquito Boom: Is the water stagnant in certain areas of your pond? Are you suffering through a mosquito boom in your backyard? These little pests prefer to lay their eggs and raise their young in still water – so you might have created a perfect mosquito habitat!
  • Muck Accumulation: Decomposing plant matter and fish waste build up when the water is still and your biological filtration system – beneficial bacteria – breaks down. That muck feeds the algae blooms, which create more muck. It’s a vicious cycle that can be remedied with aeration.

Do any of these ring true? If so, your waterfall or stream is not providing enough aeration for your pond. One of our aeration systems can help. The Airmax® KoiAir™ Water Garden Aeration Kit is designed for medium and large water gardens and koi ponds that are up to 16,000 gallons. The Airmax® PondAir™ Water Garden Aeration Kit is designed for smaller water gardens up to 2,000 gallons. Both whisper-quiet systems can be run 24 hours a day, seven days a week, providing your finned pals and beneficial bacteria plenty of oxygen and water movement.

Pond Talk: When did you know it was time to upgrade your pond’s aeration system?

Breathe Life Into Your Water Garden - Airmax(r) KoiAir(t) Water Garden Aeration Kit

Why are water changes important? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Why are water changes important?

Q: Why are water changes important?

Shirley – Warr Acres, OK

A: It’s nice to open a window on a warm spring day and let the fresh air flow through your house, right? Well, a partial or complete water change in your koi pond or water garden is the same thing: It freshens your finned pals’ environment, making them happy and healthy.

Here are five reasons why water changes are so important to your fish, plants and other aquatic life:

  1. Nutrient Removal: Muck and debris buildup happens in just about every water feature. A water change manually removes any excess nutrients and chemicals like nitrates, phosphates and ammonia that can be harmful to fish and other underwater critters.
  2. Healthy Fish: Fresh, clean water means improved water quality, which ultimately promotes your fishes’ health. Just as you need oxygen to thrive, your fish need clean water to thrive. Their well being is directly related to the liquid environment in which they live.
  3. Algae Control: Pea soup and string algae feed on all that decomposing waste, which they use as fertilizer. By removing those excess nutrients in the water column with a water change, you can discourage the growth of algae.
  4. Fights Foam: Foam forms when excess organic material has accumulated in your water garden. When this nutrient-laden water pours down your waterfall, the air and water collide, causing the proteins and other organics to be trapped inside bubbles rather than turning into ammonia and nitrites. A water change will quickly reduce that foamy buildup.
  5. Clears Water, Stabilizes pH: A water change will also improve the appearance of cloudy water and maintain pH levels, resulting in a pristine pond filled with healthy fish, lush greenery and clean water.

To keep stress levels down among your fish, we recommend doing partial water changes as soon as water temperatures reach 50° F. In addition, be sure to add some Stress Reducer PLUS and LiquidClear™ to your water. The Stress Reducer PLUS forms a beneficial slime coat on your fish and makes tap water safe for them. The LiquidClear’s™ beneficial bacteria helps to digest dead organics in the water, making it crystal clear.

Pond Talk: How often do you do water changes in your koi pond or water garden?

Builds Protective Slime Coating - Pond Logic (r) Stress Reducer PLUS

Why does my water garden turn green and can I prevent it? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Why does my water garden turn green and can I prevent it?

Q: Why does my water garden turn green and can I prevent it?

Laurie- Bardstown, KY

A: Green water in fish ponds and water features are a common conundrum faced by hobbyists. What causes it, and how can it be fixed?

Algae Explosion
Green water is the result of an imbalance in your pond’s ecosystem. When too many nutrients – also known as decomposing plant material, fish waste and other debris – build up in your water garden, algae flourish because the nutrients act like fertilizer to those tiny plants. That thriving planktonic algae is what causes your water to resemble pea soup.

Finding Balance:
To achieve balance in your pond, you need to evaluate and correct the underlying problems that are causing your green water. Here’s a guide that can help you identify the problem and work toward a solution:

  • Problem: Too many fish.
    Solution: If your water garden is brimming with fish, it may be time to relocate some of them. Overcrowding is a common source for green water because your filtration system may not be large enough to handle the amount of waste being produced. A simple rule of thumb to ensure room for your fish is one fish (5 inches long) for every 10 square feet of surface area.
  • Problem: debris buildup.
    Solution: After a long winter, waste and debris may have built up in your pond. A good spring cleanout will remove those excess nutrients that are feeding the algae. Here’s an easy step-by-step spring cleaning guide to follow that will help you through the process.
  • Problem: Inadequate mechanical filtration.
    Solution: Mechanical filtration helps to remove the excess nutrients from the water column. As the water passes through the filtration system, debris is removed and collected in the filter box or skimmer. Check to be sure your filtration system is adequate for your pond’s size and fish population. If it’s not, consider giving it a boost.
  • Problem: Lack of beneficial bacteria.
    Solution: Beneficial bacteria, like those found in DefensePAC®, are microorganisms that eat through detritus and other algae-feeding nutrients. With little or no nutrients to feed the algae, the green stuff will eventually die off. Learn more about DefensePAC’s components and how to use them here.
  • Problem: Inadequate aeration.
    Solution: Those beneficial bacteria – as well as your pond’s fish – need life-giving oxygen to thrive, and that’s where aeration comes into play. Air being pumped into the water via a diffuser or air stone will circulate the water column and infuse the water with oxygen. Learn more about the importance of aeration here.
  • Problem: Too much sunlight and not enough plants.
    Solution: Because algae are plants, sunlight is essential for growth. You can block that sunlight by covering your water’s surface with floating plants. We recommend shading 40 to 60 percent of your pond with water lilies or other floating plants.

Going Ultraviolet
Once you’ve cleaned out your pond, checked your filtration and aeration systems, added some beneficial bacteria, adjusted your fish load and added some plants, you should be well on your way to clearing up that pesky algae. A final remedy to try is an ultraviolet clarifier, like The Pond Guy’s® PowerUV™ Clarifier. It’s designed to clear water. As a result, the tiny particles of debris clump together and are removed by your mechanical filtration system.

Good luck keeping that green water at bay!

Pond Talk: What do you do to clear up algae in your koi pond or water garden?

Eliminate Discolored Water - Pond Logic (r) PowerUV (t)

I’ve heard a lot about Clipper Herbicide. What does it do? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I’ve heard a lot about Clipper Herbicide. What does it do?

Eldon – Urbandale, IA

A: Clipper™ Aquatic Herbicide controls a wide variety of algae, floating weeds and submerged weeds, but its claim to fame is its ability to wipe out troublesome watermeal and duckweed—two aquatic weeds that can be difficult to manage in any pond or lake. In fact, when used as directed, up to 80 percent of duckweed and watermeal will be eliminated within the first application of Clipper™. Not too shabby!

Here are some tips for use:

  • Check your pH first: High pH levels will reduce Clipper’s™ effectiveness, so test the pH of your pond’s water with a pH Test Kit before using the herbicide. Apply it only when the pH is 8.5 and below.
  • Apply on a sunny morning: The herbicide is a reactive treatment that works better in the sunlight, so treat your pond or lake early in the morning on a sunny day. Hold off on adding light-blocking Pond Dye to your water, until after Clipper™ has had a chance to go to work on the weeds.
  • Spray and play: Applying Clipper™ to aquatic weeds is easy. Simply mix the amount of Clipper™ and water in a Specialty Pond Sprayer according to label instructions, and spray onto floating weeds and algae or place the tip beneath the water’s surface to treat submerged weeds. Over time, the weeds will begin to brown and die.
  • A little goes a long way: You only need to use 1 pound of Clipper™ per surface acre one to two times per year. Because it’s a contact herbicide, complete coverage is essential for effective control. You can reapply Clipper™ after 28 days if you find that you’ve missed some weed patches after the first treatment.
  • No temperature restrictions: Clipper™ can be used year-round in any temperature, but it should be applied only when the weeds are actively growing.
  • Rake away the debris: Once the aquatic weeds are completely dead, use a rake—like the Pond & Beach Rake —to remove the debris. This will prevent the foliage from accumulating and turning into algae-feeding muck.

Clipper™ Aquatic Herbicide can be used in a range of waterways, including bayous, canals, drainage ditches, lakes, marshes, freshwater ponds and reservoirs. It quickly and effectively controls watermeal, duckweed, water lettuce, giant salvinia, cabomba, Eurasian watermilfoil, hydrilla and curlyleaf pondweed. If you fight aquatic weeds in your lake or pond, consider using Clipper™. It’s good stuff!

Pond Talk: Have you tried Clipper™ in your pond or lake? If so, tell us how it worked for you.

The Pond Guy(r) Promote Fish Growth This Season - The Pond Guy(r) Game Fish Grower

The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Sharon – Waynesboro, GA

A: Inside your ClearPAC® PLUS box, you’ll find everything you need to keep your lake clean and clear this spring and summer. The five components, when used as directed, address the root of the most common pond problems by tackling excess nutrients and shielding the water from algae-feeding sunlight.
When should you start using ClearPAC® PLUS? It all depends on your water temperature. Let’s take a closer look at when and how to best use the products in your super-pack.

  • Pond Dye: As soon as the ice melts on your pond or lake, add your Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye. The dye is not temperature-sensitive so it can be used even when water temps are too cold for beneficial bacteria products. Pond Dye does more than color your water and add to your landscape’s aesthetic; it also shades it from sunlight, which can kick-start algae blooms as the mercury rises.
  • PondClear™ and MuckAway™: When water temperatures rise to a consistent 50°F, you can start using the beneficial bacteria found in PondClear™ and MuckAway™ to break down nutrients suspended in your water column and muck on the bottom of your pond. These products can be used at the same time as your Pond Dye and EcoBoost™.
  • EcoBoost™: This bacteria booster that has no temperature restrictions, so it can be used year-round to bind phosphates that find their way into your pond or lake. You can use EcoBoost™ throughout the spring to give you a head start on pond season.
  • Algae Defense® : To be used only as needed, this algae-destroyer treats troublesome floating filamentous algae, bottom growing chara and the planktonic algae when it’s green and growing. Use Algae Defense® when the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60°F. Don’t use Algae Defense® if you keep koi or trout in your lake.

After treating your pond with ClearPAC® PLUS, don’t forget to remove dead algae and debris with your Pond & Beach Rake. Doing so will remove the decaying vegetation and prevent them from feeding the algae—which will ultimately help your Pond Dye, PondClear™, MuckAway™, EcoBoost™ and Algae Defense® work even better!

Pond Talk: Has spring sprung in your area of the country?

Keep Your Pond Clean and Clear - Pond Logic(r) ClearPAC® PLUS

How do I know if my filtration system is adequate for my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: How do I know if my filtration system is adequate for my pond?

Q: How do I know if my filtration system is adequate for my pond?

Roger – Grayson, GA

A: Clean, clear water is a must-have in any water feature. It allows you to see those gorgeous koi and goldfish swimming below the surface. It shows that you have excellent water quality, with plenty of oxygen for your pond’s inhabitants—including the microscopic ones, like beneficial bacteria. And it puts off no offensive odors, which means you can host shindigs by your water garden without scaring off your friends.

When your water quality is suffering, your pond is telling you that your filtration isn’t up to par. Here are four clear signs that say you need to kick it up a notch.

  1. Algae Blooms, Clarity Concerns: If you have a filtration system in place but you still have water clarity issues and algae blooms, that’s an obvious indicator that you need an upgrade. When selecting a more powerful filtration system, like our AllClear™ PLUS Pressurized Filters with a built-in ultraviolet clarifier, make sure it’s sized appropriately for your pond and its nutrient load.
  2. Fish Frenzy: If your pond’s resident fish have multiplied and grown over the years, then you’re likely overdue for a more powerful filter system. Most filter systems are marketed for a minimal fish load, so too many fish producing waste will overload the system. Remember: The rule is to allow 1 inch of adult fish per square foot of surface area. If you have too many koi or goldfish in your pond, you should think about finding new homes for some of your finned friends or increasing your filtration.
  3. Toxic Test Results: Test your pond’s water with one of our Master Test Kits to find out what your ammonia, nitrite and phosphate levels are. If you see high ammonia levels or if your fishes’ health has been suffering, the pond lacks proper filtration.
  4. Foamy Falls: Have you seen foam build up at the base of your waterfall or stream? All that frothiness, which is caused by excess protein and oil excreted by fish and other pond dwellers, can be a sign of excessive nutrient levels caused by inadequate filtration. A higher-powered filter system can help remove and dissipate that foam.

If you have a waterfall filter box, you can easily boost your filtration system’s water-cleaning power by adding Matala® Filter Pads. With four different densities—low, medium, high and super high—you can mix and match them to suit your pond’s unique needs.

Pond Talk: What telltale sign told you that it was time to increase your filtration system?

3 Types of Filtration, 1 Powerful Unit - Pond Logic (r) AllClear(t) PLUS Pressurized Filters

Top Blog Posts of 2013

As 2013 comes to a close, we sit back and look at all the amazing things that happened this year. We thank you, our wonderful customers, for a great year. Below are our Top Blogs for 2013! Your interest in our products and your thirst for pond knowledge truly makes us thankful to have you as a customer. We aim to give you the knowledge and products you need to make your pond great. As always, if you have questions or comments, please feel to send them our way! 
We wish you a safe and happy 2014.
From The Pond Guy® Staff

Top 5 Blog Posts in Pond & Lake

Top Blog Posts of 2013 - Pond & Lake

Q: After a really warm day, I have algae floating on my pond. How do I control it?

Q: After getting out of my swimming pond, I had a leech on my leg! How do I remove leeches from my pond?
Q: I see predator control options for geese and swans, but what about options for other animals, like raccoons?
Q: My fish population is growing rapidly, but how do I know if my fish population is balanced?
Q: How do I know if my pond is covered in pollen or algae?

Top 5 Blog Posts in Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens

Top Blog Posts of 2013 - Water Garden

Q: What do I need to do to perform a spring cleanout?

Q: How do I treat my pond fish for ich and other diseases?

Q: My water turned brown about this time last year. How do I stop it from happening again?

Q: My fish are looking for food. Can I feed them now? If so, what kind of food do I give them?

Q: My stream is already accumulating algae! Is there anything I can use to help clean it up?

Happy New Year from The Pond Guy(r)

When should I stop treating algae? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When should I stop treating algae?

Q: When should I stop treating algae?

Rich – Bartlesville, OK

A: It’s not so much a matter of when as it is what temperature your water is.

In theory, with the right equipment, algae can be managed all year-long. But if you want to treat it with chemicals, the water temperature in your lake needs to above 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The active ingredients in Pond Logic® Algae Defense® that are used to control suspended, floating and bottom-of-the-pond algae require warmer water temperatures to work properly.

So when your water temperature is below 60°F, you’re out of luck for using chemical treatments.

Before cooler temperatures chill your water this fall, give any planktonic algae, filamentous algae or chara growing in your pond a dose of Algae Defense®. The best time to apply the fast-acting formula is in the morning on a calm, sunny day. Simply mix with water and spray directly onto algae with a pressurized sprayer. Once the green stuff is dead, don’t forget to remove it with the Pond & Beach Rake to prevent an accumulation of dead algae and muck.

So what do you do if you’re hosting a Halloween party but the water temperature in your pond—filled with spooky, pea green masses—is lower than 60°F? Try clearing things up with The Pond Guy® PondSkim™. Measuring 5 feet wide and constructed with a super tough screen, the skimmer floats on the water surface and collects floating algae as you pull it along with your boat. Problem solved!

Pond Talk: How do you manage late-season algae blooms in your pond or lake?

Quickly Kill Late Season Algae - Pond Logic(r) Algae Defense(r)

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