• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

What is the optimum water temperature for my pond, and when should I worry that it’s too hot? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: What is the optimum water temperature for my pond, and when should I worry that it’s too hot?

Q: What is the optimum water temperature for my pond, and when should I worry that it’s too hot?

Gayle – Syracuse, NY

A: “Room temperature” isn’t just for humans. Fish and pond critters prefer particular underwater temperatures, too. In fact, and a high-temp living environment can even affect their health and well-being. Warm water holds less oxygen than cool water, so they’ll be literally gasping for breath if it gets too hot.

As the air temperature heats up this summer, the water temperature in your pond will increase, too, so it’s critical to keep an eye on it as the mercury rises. Use your Floating Pond Thermometer to test the waters. The best water temperature for your aquatic pals is between 68° and 74° Fahrenheit (pretty close to an ideal air temperature for humans).

If your thermometer tops 85°F, you’ll need to cool your water. Here’s what we recommend:

  • Add Aeration:Make sure you have your aeration system, like the Pond Logic® PondAir™ or KoiAir™ Aeration System, up and running. It’s like an underwater fan for your koi and goldfish. The moving, bubbling water is cooler and loaded with oxygen, making it easier for your fish to breathe.
  • Add Plants: Just as you seek out shady spots to shield yourself from the sun’s rays, fish will do the same to keep themselves cool. Make sure that about 60 percent of your pond’s surface is covered with floating plants, water lilies and other types of shade cover for your pond pets.
  • Add Water: Warmer temperatures mean increased evaporation rates, so make sure you top off your pond during hot weather. Doing so isn’t a substitute for a water change, but it will cool off the water and ensure your finned friends have enough wet stuff in their pond.

One last tip: Do not feed your fish when water temperatures are above 85°F. They probably won’t be hungry. And besides, the uneaten food will just ruin your water quality.

Pond Talk: What’s the hottest temperature you’ve recorded in your water garden?

Breathe Life Into Your Pond - Pond Logic(r) PondAir(tm) Aeration Kit

Do I Need Aeration in the Hot Summer Months? – Pond & Lake Q & A

Picture of Three Diffusers in a Bottom Bubbler Aerator

Q: Do I need aeration in the hot summer months?
- Several Customers

A: We are just starting to enter into the hottest days of summer. Are you and your pond prepared to deal with the scorching heat? The need for aeration in your pond during these temperatures is far greater than any other part of the year. Although most pond owners are aware of this fact, few know the true reasons behind the need.

The Need For Aeration
First, let’s start with the actual need for aeration in your pond. Every pond is a “time bomb” just waiting to go off. A pond that has just been excavated is usually nutrient free, making it easy to take care of. This stage in a ponds life is called Stage 1, and may only last one year depending on nutrient inputs. Man-made ponds and lakes tend to gain large amounts of nutrients in a short period of time, often after only a couple years of existence. When a pond enters this period of excess nutrients, it is called Stage 2. Once a pond enters this stage, you will begin to experience large amounts of algae and weed growth. Also during this stage the pond will develop a large buildup of organic debris at the bottom of the pond called “muck”. The “muck” in your pond will slowly decompose and release nutrients into the water column. These excess nutrients will cause more weed and algae growth. Along with the nutrient spike, the water body will also experience a rise in toxic gas levels. Also, when organic material decomposes, it uses oxygen in the water, causing dangerously low oxygen levels in the depths of your pond. Because ponds without aeration normally become thermally stratified, the toxic gasses created on the bottom buildup in the cool water underneath. A change in temperature, a heavy rain, or sometimes even high winds can turn the water over allowing the toxic, oxygen-deprived water at the bottom to mix into the top layer leaving your fish without oxygen and causing a fish kill.

Fountains vs. Bottom Bubblers
Many pond owners will turn to fountain aeration or surface aerators to experience some form of aesthetics for their dollar. While fountains are aesthetically pleasing, they will only draw surface waters. This leaves the bottom of the pond uncirculated and does nothing to eliminate toxic gases underneath. A better alternative is to consider a bottom bubbler. The bottom bubbler will circulate the entire water column, and eliminating the thermocline. This allows the organisms present to utilize the entire pond, not just the upper layer. The best option for a bottom bubbler is the Airmax® Aeration system. In combination with aerobic, “muck” eating bacteria (such as Pond Clear Natural Bacteria), the system can eliminate up to 5 inches of “muck” per year.

How Airmax® Aeration Works
The system consists of a high quality air compressor which is mounted in a cabinet housing unit. The compressor pumps air through a lead free self-weighted air hose and out of the diffuser plate on the pond bottom. The diffuser assembly comes with air stones that inject oxygen into the pond directly and create a column of medium bubbles lift and circulate the entire water body. This keeps the oxygen levels even throughout the pond or lake. Something that is important to keep in mind is how to run the compressor. The aerator is as simple to run as plugging in the cord, and to reduce stress on organisms in the pond you should follow this start-up procedure.

Starting Up Your Airmax® Aeration System
When an aerator is first installed it is important that you don’t begin running it constantly right away. If the aerator rotates the water column too quickly, it can actually cause a fish kill by moving the toxic gases throughout the pond in one fell swoop. The best route to take is to run the aerator for only 30 minutes on its first day, then shutting it off for the remainder of that day. The second day you should run the aeration system for one full hour then turn it off. The third day double to 2 hours, then to 4 hours the next, 8 the next, until you are running your system all day. This process will take 7 days to accomplish. Not only should this process be followed the first time an aerator is installed, it should be followed every time the aerator is turned on after an extended shutdown.

Relax…
Now that we’ve covered the different needs and phases of pond aeration, lose the headache, and relax in the heat knowing you’re on your way to a healthy pond ecosystem.

Additional Information For The Reader
Airmax® Aeration is the 1st step in the 4-Steps To The Perfect Eco-System and is by far the most important. Steps 2, 3 & 4 are conveniently placed in a combined package called a ClearPAC. The ClearPAC is our all-in-one solution to a clear pond including Pond Clear Bacteria, Nutri-Defense pond clearer, and Natures Blue dye.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 139 other followers