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Fighting Muck and Pond Odor – How to control and prevent muck accumulation and pond odor | Learning Center

There’s nothing worse than that musty, rotten egg, sulfur-type smell that’s pungent enough to ruin spring strolls by the pond. What causes it and what can you do about it?

Common Causes
Those odors are common in ponds that aren’t aerated, particularly during certain times of the year. In the summer and winter, non-aerated ponds stratify into layers of water with distinct temperature differences. This locks the bottom layer away for months.

While the water layer is trapped down there, the oxygen is used up quickly. It goes from an aerobic environment to an anaerobic environment – which is perfect for slow-moving anaerobic bacteria that use enzymes to ferment and digest the decaying muck on the bottom. Those microorganisms ultimately produce waste products, including carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, which is that lovely rotten egg smell.

In the spring and during strong weather events, the water column turns over; the anaerobic layers on the bottom rise to the top, bringing with it all those foul-smelling odors. That’s likely what you’re experiencing with your pond, which could be made worse by melting ice releasing all those gases at once.

Stink-Stopping Solutions
So what can you do? At this point, first test your pH and water quality, as pond turn-overs could cause pH shifts, dissolved oxygen crashes and algae blooms that could harm or kill your fish (which could add to the odor problem …).

If the water temperatures in your pond are 50 degrees Fahrenheit or above, add some Pond Logic® MuckAway™ and Pond Logic® PondClear™. The beneficial bacteria in the products will help break down the decaying muck on the pond bottom as well as clearing up suspended particles in the water column.

As soon as you can, install an aeration system and crank it on. Airmax® Aeration Systems product line includes aerators suited for any size pond – from shallow water bodies to ponds up to 6 acres. They each include diffusers, a compressor, cabinet, airline and Free Aeration Mapping Service that takes the guesswork out of diffuser placement.

Finally, cut and rake out dead and decaying organic material with a weed removal tool. The more you can eradicate, the better it’ll be for your pond’s water quality – and stink factor.

Fish Spawning – How to help your koi have a successful spawning season | Learning Center

There is a ton of information available for selectively breeding koi and raising fry. Purchasing fry holding tanks with separate filters, specific breeding media or even choosing the perfect fish to mate. If you are like most homeowners you are not looking to dive in to serious koi hatching, however, there are a few things you can do to help your koi still have a successful spawning season.

Provide Spawning Areas
The leaves, stems and root systems of underwater plants give your pond fish safe places to spawn and lay their eggs. And when those tiny fry hatch, the plants provide protection, food and a comfy place to call home.

Submerged plants are easy to add to your water garden or fish pond. Simply fill planting baskets, like the Laguna Planting Baskets, with planting media, add some oxygenators, and place the planted basket on the bottom of your pond or on a plant shelf on the side of your pond. The planting baskets allow the plant’s roots to branch out and find nourishment while containing it and preventing fish from nibbling on its root system.

Wait for the Right Season
Temperature and time of year matter when it comes to koi breeding. The fish typically spawn when water temperatures are 65° to 70°F. In many ponds, this typically happens between May and June – in late spring and early summer, when the birds and bees start to get busy!

Time to Spawn
When koi prepare to spawn, you will see the males chasing after the females, nudging her sides with its mouth and fins. This is to encourage the female koi to lay her eggs. Once the eggs have been laid, the male koi will fertilize them, and the future koi will begin to grow and develop. You may also notice cloudy or foamy water accompanied by a distinct odor.

Keep Your Pond Clean
It is important that you keep the water in your pond clean and free from disease while the fry are developing. Perform regular water changes and use Pond Logic® Stress Reducer PLUS when adding new water to remove any chlorine and toxic heavy metals from your tap or well water. Be sure you are adding pond salt to the water to keep fish stress down and also help prevent diseases.

Keep the Fry Safe
Once the fry emerge from their eggs, they can’t swim and will need a protected area that’s safe from natural predators, like tadpoles, frogs and koi. Make sure you give them plenty of coverage with water hyacinth, water lettuce and other aquatic plants. You might also consider using a fine mesh tent, like the Nycon Fish Spawning Incubator to protect them and prevent them from getting lost in your filtration system.

As your new additions began to grow, there will be added ammonia and nitrates in the pond. If you plan to keep these new koi make sure you are providing adequate filtration in your pond and you are not deviating from a practical fish load for your size pond. Having more fish in your pond than your filtration can handle will lead to additional more severe algae blooms and muck accumulation. It is important that you keep adding beneficial bacteria such as Nature’s Defense® or Muck Defense® to break this waste down.

With a little staging and encouragement, it’s not too difficult to convince your koi to spawn. Good luck!

Fish Acclimation – Introducing new fish to your pond | Learning Center

Now that your pond is constructed and flowing, bringing home fish is the next step in bringing your pond to life. This process can be both exciting and stressful for you and your fish. Follow the steps below to ensure a safe transition for your fish.

Prep Your Pond
Make sure the water in your pond is ready for new occupants by treating for chlorine or heavy metals found in city and tap water. Chlorine can cause burns in fish and on their gills, which in turn will cause even more fish stress. You can accomplish this by adding Pond Logic® Stress Reducer PLUS. You should also test pond water for acceptable pH and Nitrate levels in the pond. Many potential health issues can be avoided by simply maintaining a clean and healthy pond.

Inspect Before You Select
It is easy to get attached to that perfect fish right from the start but be sure to make sure they are feeling ready to travel. Some common signs to look for are clamped fins, open sores or separating themselves from other fish in the tank. Choosing a fish that is healthy right from the start ensures a more successful transportation.

Transportation Home
Your newly purchased fish are typically handed over to you in an oxygenated plastic bag or container to allow adequate time to transport them to their new home. As you travel be sure to keep fish in a cool dim location to keep them calm and keep water cool. Cooler water will also hold more valuable oxygen that your fish will need as they travel.

Acclimate Your Fish to Their New Environment
You will want to gradually equalize the temperature of the water your fish are currently occupying with that of the water in your pond. If the container carrying your fish floats, go ahead and place it in your pond. The water inside will start balancing with the outside water temperature. This process should take no longer than 30 minutes.

During this time frame, slowly add small amounts of water from the pond into the container, which will allow your new fish time to acclimate to the chemistry of your pond water. Most of us have, at one time or another, jumped into a pool too early in the summer only to find that the water is unimaginably cold. Those of you who’ve been in that situation understand why you will want to take your time with the acclimation process. Now that the water on both sides of the container is the same and the fish have had time to try out the make up of the water in the pond, you are clear to release them into their new environment!

Take a few moments throughout the day to check in on the pond and monitor the behavior of the newly introduced fish. Active and curious fish are happy and healthy fish.

Snapping Turtles – How to identify and deter them from your pond | Learning Center

Snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) are large freshwater turtles that make their homes in ponds and streams with plenty of room and food. When encountered in the water, they typically slip quietly away from any disturbance – but because they can have fierce dispositions, it’s a good idea to get to know these shelled reptiles and their habits a little better.

Identification
C. serpentina has a look all its own. Resembling a prehistoric dinosaur, the snapping turtle has a large, muscular build with a ridged carapace (hard shell) that can grow up to 18 inches. They usually weigh between 10 to 35 pounds. Its most defining features, however, are its long, flexible neck and beak-like mouth that it uses to snap prey and defend itself from predators.

On the Menu
The omnivore’s preferred meals include just about anything it can capture and swallow, including aquatic plants, invertebrates, fish, frogs, reptiles, birds and small mammals. It’ll even eat carrion. In a farm or swimming pond, a snapping turtle might snap up some undesirable visitors, like snakes.

Night Life
A snapping turtle is mostly active at night, but it does venture out during the day to bask on fallen logs and scavenge and hunt for food. When C. serpentina is walking the terra firma, it can be aggressive, particularly when it feels threatened – and this is when you should avoid contact at all costs. A snap from a snapping turtle can be painful!

Remove and Relocate
If a snapping turtle is causing problems in your pond, your best bet is to safely and humanely remove it. Grabbing its shell with your hands is a bad idea; it can easily stretch its neck back across its own shell to its hind feet and snap your fingers, and it can scratch you with its sharp claws.

Instead, trap it in a turtle trap, like one of our Tomahawk Live Traps. The 32-by-18-by-9-inch trap made with 12-gauge wire comes pre-assembled and ready to use. Simply place it in the water partially submerged and bait with fish or meat. When you capture the critter, relocate it to a place that has a water body, food and shelter.

Starting up Aeration in the Spring – How to reintroduce an aeration system to your pond | Learning Center

Ideally, your aeration system should run all year long. By running it all year long, this will prevent possible winter fish kills. But if you shut your aeration system down in the winter for recreational purposes, you will want to start it back up when the ice starts melting off your pond. Follow the steps below to prepare your system.

  1. Re-level Your Cabinet: Take your cabinet and system back outside and get it on level ground again.
  2. Change Your Air Filter: Your air filter, which prevents debris from entering your air compressor, can be cleaned periodically to remove light debris – but it should be replaced every three to six months for maximum system performance and longevity.
  3. Check and Clean Side Intake Air Filters: Take a look at your side intake air filters on your cabinet, and make sure they’re clean and unobstructed.
  4. Ensure Cabinet Fan Works: To make sure fresh air will tunnel evenly through your cabinet, flip on your fan and verify that it’s working properly.
  5. Purge Membrane Diffuser Sticks: Though they’re virtually maintenance-free, these diffuser sticks, which deliver the air bubbles to the water, should be purged and inspected before they are turned on for the season. More information on this process can be found in your Owner’s Manual.
  6. Airlines Cleared: The water may still be icy in your pond, so check your airlines for ice buildup. To clear them, pour 1 cup of isopropyl alcohol through the airline running out to each plate, turn on the compressor and push through the line to free any tiny icebergs.
  7. Start Your Compressor – Gradually: To prevent shocking your pond, follow your aeration system’s initial seven-day startup procedure. On Day 1, run the system for 30 minutes and then turn it off for the rest of the day. On each day following, double the time: Day 2, run for one hour; Day 3, run for two hours; Day 4, run for four hours; and so on. On Day 7, begin running it for 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  8. Pressure Check: Once your system is up and running, make sure that its pressure gauge stays within the normal range of 5 to 10 psi. An easy way to do this to mark the gauge upon initial start up and check it regularly to verify pressure has not significantly risen above or dropped below your initial reading. Please note, this does not apply to Shallow Water Series™ Aeration Systems.

Following these simple steps will guarantee a smooth start to aerating your pond this spring. If you’re ever in doubt, check out your owner’s manual or contact us at 866-766-3435.

Benefits of Owning a Pond or Lake – 5 Reasons a pond or lake is a great addition to your property | Learning Center

Lakes and ponds make wonderful additions to any property. If you have the space and the resources, a large body of water creates an instant habitat for wildlife, and a fun place for you and your family! Here are just a few benefits of digging a large pond or lake:

  1. Gives You a Nice Place to Sit and Relax: Imagine lounging in a hammock alongside your pond, swaying in the cool breeze. Picture yourself enjoying a cool glass of lemonade while sitting on your dock and watching your fountain cast rainbows against a blue sky. There is a reason why folks vacation at their favorite lake house! You could have one of your own in your back yard.
  2. Creates a Wildlife Habitat: If you like the great outdoors and all the critters in it, you’ll appreciate the variety of wildlife a lake or large pond will bring. Animals of all sorts gravitate toward water. Depending on where you live, you can expect to see wild birds and waterfowl, raccoons, turtles, frogs, butterflies and dragonflies, not to mention all the underwater life. These animals will call the pond and your property home, making it an entertaining ecosystem for your family and friends.
  3. Becomes your own fishing pond: If you’re a fishing enthusiast, you probably know that there are few things better than fishing your own stocked pond. You’d be able to set up habitats for them, feed them and monitor their behavior. Rather than getting up before dawn and driving to a favorite fishing hole, you can pull on your waders and head out to your own pond whenever the fish are biting!
  4. Provides water fun for everyone: From paddle boating and swimming in the summer to ice skating and ice fishing in the winter, a pond or lake will be sure to satisfy just about any outdoor adventure. But remember to always play safe, making sure you supervise children at all times and have a life ring and rope nearby.
  5. Stores water for farm animals, irrigation: A more practical benefit, some property owners keep a pond to water their horses, sheep, goats and cattle. It’s an accessible watering hole for them, as well as a habitat for wild animals. Others may use the lake or pond to hold water for crop or garden irrigation during the dry months of the year.

Small lakes or farms ponds make a useful and fun addition to any property. They benefit the local ecosystem, they provide a fun and relaxing place to gather with family and friends, and they offer practical benefits, too. It’s definitely something to consider!

Pond Leaks – Tips on how to find and repair a leak in your pond | Learning Center

A tiny hole in your pond liner or one loose plumbing connection could cause a leak that slowly – or quickly, depending on the leak’s size – drain your pond. And that leak could be anywhere. You’ll need to do some investigating to determine where the problem is and then get busy making repairs. Here’s what we suggest.

  1. Rock Steady: Because rocks can shift over time, the first thing to do is return them to their original position and lock them into place. As you move the rocks back, check to see if they tore the liner or shifted it out of place. If so, patch the hole and tuck the liner back in. Use PondBuilder™ PondBuild ‘N Foam to fill in gaps between the rocks, support them and prevent them from moving again next winter.
  2. Rule Out Evaporation: During the heat of summer, you can expect some evaporation – and it can cause your pond to lose up to an inch of water a day. If you have a long stream bed with a lot of surface area or a large pond with few floating plants, even more water could transform from liquid to vapor. To rule out evaporation, fill the pond back up and keep an eye on the water level. Any more than an inch or so of water loss could indicate a leak.
  3. Check for Damp Spots: If more than an inch or so of water is disappearing daily, one clear clue that could lead to your leak is a damp area around the pond’s perimeter. That water has to go somewhere, and a low-lying patch of wet ground is a great place to start looking for its source. Walk around the pond and carefully inspect the soil for signs of unexplained moisture.
  4. Rule Out the Liner: If you’ve ruled out evaporation and found no damp areas, there are two more possible leak culprits: your waterfall or your liner. Shut down waterfall pump and wait for several hours. If the pond’s water level stays the same, then you’ll know the leak is not in the liner itself. It’s likely in the waterfall or plumbing. Check your waterfall box and skimmer for cracks or if the liner isn’t attached, and inspect your plumbing for loose connections.
  5. Track, Repair Liner Leak: At this point, the bad news is that you probably have a hole in your liner, and finding it won’t be easy. But the good news is that it is possible to track it down and repair it.
    1. To find it, use Pond Logic® Pond Shade or some milk to visually track the leak. Simply add a few drops on the side and watch it as it finds its way to the leak. This will take some time, a few attempts — and patience. You can also let the water slowly go down. (Depending how low it goes, you may need to temporarily relocate your fish.) The water level should stabilize, which will allow you to visually inspect the first few inches of liner above the water surface for the hole.
    2. Once you’ve found the hole, patch it up with an EPDM Liner Patch Kit or use some Gold Label Pond Sealer. The 8-inch liner patch is easy to use on small punctures: Just peel off the protective film and press onto the liner. The sealer can be used in wet or dry conditions and will seal completely in 48 hours.

Good luck tracking down that leak and repairing it!

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