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Is there any danger to my fish if the pond is always in direct sunlight? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Is there any danger to my fish if the pond is always in direct sunlight?

Q: Is there any danger to my fish if the pond is always in direct sunlight?

Claudia – De Witt, AR

A: Sunshine has its benefits – but it also has its dangers. Direct sunlight with no shade can raise the water temperature in your pond and reduce the levels of oxygen available to your fish. All those rays can also fuel algae blooms, as well as give your fish a sunburn (yes, really!).

Don’t worry: You don’t need to relocate your water feature to a less sunny locale. There are some easy ways to add shade to your pond, and here’s what we recommend.

  • Terrestrial Shade: Trees, and terrestrial and marginal plants growing alongside your pond can provide plenty of shade from the outside. Blue Flag Iris and Dwarf Cattail, for instance, planted on the south or west side will cast cool, shady shadows for your fish.
  • Get Creative with Canopies: If planting trees or plants isn’t an option, consider installing a tent or canopy over part of your pond. In addition to creating protection from the sunshine, a canopy can also add some dramatic flair to your backyard décor.
  • Aquatic Plants: Aquatic plants, like water lilies and water hyacinth, create scads of underwater shade for your finned pals. Simply plant lilies in baskets or plant bags and place them in strategic spots around your pond or toss in water hyacinth to create a floating hideout.
  • Fish Shelters: For a super easy solution, drop some fish shelters, like our Nycon Koi Kastle Fish Shelter, in your water garden. Another option is to create fish caves with carefully positioned rocks. They’ll create a shady shelter that’ll protect the fish from sun – and predators.

A word of advice: Don’t over shade your pond. You still want to maintain an area with some sunlight, which helps bring out koi colors, keep the water a comfortable temperature and help your plants grow.

If you think your fish are already showing signs of heat stress, check your water temperature with a pond thermometer, like Pond Logic® Floating Pond Thermometer, and do a partial water change if the water temperatures reach the high 70s or above. You might also want to add some pond salt, which will help gill function and reduce fish stress, as well as some Stress Reducer PLUS, which alleviates stress, restores a healthy slime coat and removes dangerous toxins from the water.

Pond Talk: Have your koi or pond fish ever had a sunburn?

Give Your Fish a Break from the Sun - Nycon Koi Kastle Fish Shelters

Do I need to hire someone to install lighting in my pond, or is that something I can do? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Do I need to hire someone to install lighting in my pond, or is that something I can do?

Q: Do I need to hire someone to install lighting in my pond, or is that something I can do?

Tiffany – Savannah, TN

A: Unless you’re planning a Bellagio-esque display in your backyard, you can most certainly install some show-stopping lighting. It’s perfect for the do-it-yourselfer: A simple transformer and some quick connections allow any homeowner to take their water feature to the next level.

Layout Lighting Goals

Before you dive in, however, brainstorm what you’d like the lighting to do. What are your goals?

  • If you’d like a few lights to mark the pond at night, check out our Floating Solar Lights. They’re a great way to add nighttime illumination to any pond or water garden. The LED lights, which shift between pink, yellow and blue, are solar-powered and maintenance-free – making them an energy-efficient choice that will last for years.
  • If you’d like to illuminate a waterfall or accent a small water feature, take a look at our waterfall lights and three-pack halogen mini lights. The Pond Guy® Waterfall Light highlights waterfalls via its submersible 10-watt halogen light. It’s waterproof and includes a low-voltage transformer. The LEDPro™ Rock Lights feature a realistic stone finish, allowing them the blend naturally with your landscape.
  • If you’d like to light up your entire pond, try our LEDPro™ High Output Lights. They can be used in or out of water and shine with the same intensity as a 50-watt halogen bulb but with a longer life span and lower energy cost.

Easy Installation

Installing these lighting systems is easy. If you’re considering the LEDPro Rock Lights or High Output lights, there’s virtually no work at all. They contain a photocell, so the light will automatically turn on when it’s dark and turn off when the sun rises.

Most other pond lights we offer have standard plugs, so there’s no need for additional control panels or wiring. Before installing them, check out these pro tips:

  • To give you better access, partially drain the pond when installing the lights.
  • Leave extra power cord wrapped around the light so you can easily access it for maintenance or cleaning without draining the pond.
  • Position the lights so they shine out into the pond rather than facing you.

Pond Talk: What kinds of lights do you have illuminating your pond?

Great For Small Ponds & Gardens - The Pond Guy® 3 Watt, LEDPro™ Lights

My mom wants a water feature but needs something easy to maintain. Any suggestions? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: My mom wants a water feature but needs something easy to maintain. Any suggestions?

Q: My mom wants a water feature but needs something easy to maintain. Any suggestions?

John – Bradford, OH

A: Sounds like mom has been bitten by the water gardening bug! Thanks to all the options available to budding pond hobbyists, she doesn’t need to install a maintenance-heavy feature. She can find a simple-to-use one that’s ideal for a small yard, patio or tabletop.

It’s easy to help her choose the perfect water feature. Simply ask her these questions:

1: Does She Want to Keep Fish?

If so, she’ll need a water feature that has a pond to house fish as well as a filtration system to keep their water clean – and the AllClear™ Ecosystem Pond Kits are designed for hobbyists who want just that. They come in several sizes, but the 6-foot-by-11-foot kit creates a pond that’s about 700 gallons, which is large enough for a few fish and a small waterfall. It includes fish-safe pond liner and underlayment, a pressurized filter, a waterfall filter, pump, tubing, waterfall foam, installation hardware and 12 packets of Nature’s Defense. All she’ll need is a little help digging the hole in her yard!

2: Does She Want a Waterfall but No Fish?

If a waterfall is her main wish, she won’t need to get dirty digging a pond. She can try something self-contained, like the Atlantic™ Colorfalls Basin Kit and Colorfalls Lighted Waterfall Weir. Basin Kits come in three sizes – 12 inches, 24 inches and 36 inches – and includes a Colorfalls Basin reservoir, a TidalWave 2 pump, splash mat, auto fill valve and installation kit. She can add some aquatic plants and choose a waterfall color for nighttime viewing. And talk about low maintenance: There’s no filtration system to worry about. Easy peasy!

3: Does She Just Want the Sound of Bubbling Water?

If she’s simply after the soothing sound of bubbling water, suggest something more decorative, like the Atlantic™ Color Changing Vase Fountain and Basin Kit. Available individually in several sizes or as a set, the polyethylene vases in this water feature come alive with color and light as water bubbles from the top. The kit includes a color-changing vase fountain, fountain basin, a plumbing kit, auto fill valve, pump and remote control to turn on the light display. This simple-to-operate feature becomes quite a show-stopper at night!

These easy-maintenance water features will transform your mom’s yard or patio into a relaxing oasis that she’ll love. But be warned: Once the water gardening bug bites, she’ll be hooked – and asking for a larger pond in no time!

Pond Talk: Do you remember your first water feature? What was it like?

Beautiful Color Changing Display - Atlantic™ Color Changing Vase Kits

My skimmer has a rock cover but it looks fake. Is there anything else you can use to cover it? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: My skimmer has a rock cover but it looks fake. Is there anything else you can use to cover it?

Q: My skimmer has a rock cover but it looks fake. Is there anything else you can use to cover it?

Christine – Great Falls, MT

A: Now that spring has finally sprung, water garden aficionados are heading out to their yards to do some wintertime damage control, spruce up the surroundings and enjoy the beginning of pond season. It’s also a time when unnatural eyesores – like your obviously fake-rock skimmer cover, clunky pressure filter and boxy waterfall filter – take center stage.

We suggest you turn to Mother Nature for inspiration. Here are a few ideas to get your creative juices flowing:

  • Camouflage with Tall Cover: Bushy or taller bog plants, like dwarf bamboo or dwarf umbrella palms, will provide lush, green camouflage around your skimmer in no time at all. These quick-growing species grow up to 2 feet tall, add texture and interest to your landscape, and naturally filter the water. Plus, they make a perfect habitat for dragonflies, frogs and other pond critters.
  • Position Plants in Planters: Another option is to plant some aquatic or terrestrial plants in small, movable planters, and position them on and around your skimmer. Go with blossoming perennials for pops of color or plants with dramatic foliage, like variegated taro or silk stockings arrowhead. Here’s a pro tip for you: Place water hyacinth right in the waterfall filter to hide the hardware and add filtration.
  • Choose Realistic-Looking Synthetic Rock: You can also replace your unrealistic rock cover with a more realistic one, like our TrueRock™ Boulder and Flat Covers. These faux hand-painted rocks, which come in a range of sizes and shapes, are made with fiberglass construction, making them rugged yet lightweight. Whether you use them to hide your skimmer, waterfall or pressure filter, they blend right into your pondscape.

When you’re considering ways to hide your pond equipment, remember that easy access is critical. Make sure you can get to your skimmer and filters for regular cleaning and repair. Other than that, have fun with it! Tap into your inner landscape designer and create a water garden oasis that you’ll enjoy all season long.

Pond Talk: What are your favorite ways to camouflage unsightly pond equipment?

Hide Filters In Your Landscape - Pond Logic® TrueRock™ Covers

Some of my rocks and stream shifted over the winter, and I think I may have a leak. What is the easiest way to fix it? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Some of my rocks and stream shifted over the winter, and I think I may have a leak. What is the easiest way to fix it?

Q: Some of my rocks and stream shifted over the winter, and I think I may have a leak. What is the easiest way to fix it?

Pat – Cumberland, MD

A: Ice and snow can certainly do a number on a landscape – if you’ve ever seen how a glacier can carve through the earth, you know what we’re talking about! Around your pond, the same type of thing can occur, albeit on a smaller scale. Ice, snow and even heavy bouts of rain can shift rocks and soil, cause erosion and move or puncture your liner, resulting in leaks.

So what can be done? You’ll need to do some investigating to determine where the problem is and then get busy making repairs. Here’s what we suggest.

1. Rock Steady

Because the rocks shifted over the winter, the first thing to do is return them to their original position them and lock them into place. As you move the rocks back, check to see if they tore the liner or shifted it out of place. If so, patch the hole and tuck the liner back in. Use PondBuilder™ PondBuild ‘N Foam to fill in gaps between the rocks, support them and prevent them from moving again next winter.

2. Rule Out Evaporation

During the heat of summer, you can expect some evaporation – and it can cause your pond to lose up to an inch of water a day. If you have a long stream bed with a lot of surface area or a large pond with few floating plants, even more water could transform from liquid to vapor. To rule out evaporation, fill the pond back up and keep an eye on the water level. Any more than an inch or so of water loss could indicate a leak.

3. Check for Damp Spots

If more than an inch or so of water is disappearing daily, one clear clue that could lead to your leak is a damp area around the pond’s perimeter. That water has to go somewhere, and a low-lying patch of wet ground is a great place to start looking for its source. Walk around the pond and carefully inspect the soil for signs of unexplained moisture.

4. Rule Out the Liner

If you’ve ruled out evaporation and found no damp areas, there are two more possible leak culprits: your waterfall or your liner. Shut down waterfall pump and wait for several hours. If the pond’s water level stays the same, then you’ll know the leak is not in the liner itself. It’s likely in the waterfall or plumbing. Check your waterfall box and skimmer for cracks or if the liner isn’t attached, and inspect your plumbing for loose connections.

5. Track, Repair Liner Leak

At this point, the bad news is that you probably have a hole in your liner, and finding it won’t be easy. But the good news is that it is possible to track it down and repair it.

To find it, use Pond Logic® Pond Shade or some milk to visually track the leak. Simply add a few drops on the side and watch it as it finds its way to the leak. This will take some time, a few attempts — and patience. You can also let the water slowly go down. (Depending how low it goes, you may need to temporarily relocate your fish.) The water level should stabilize, which will allow you to visually inspect the first few inches of liner above the water surface for the hole.

Once you’ve found the hole, patch it up with an EPDM Liner Patch Kit or use some Gold Label Pond Sealer. The 6-inch liner patch is easy to use on small punctures: Just peel off the protective film and press onto the liner. The sealer can be used in wet or dry conditions and will seal completely in 48 hours.

Good luck tracking down that leak and repairing it!

Pond Talk: Tell us about your most mysterious pond leak. How did you find it and repair it?

Quickly Repair Winter Damage - Tite Seal™ EPDM Pond Liner Patch Kit

I recently installed a small pondless water feature. How do I maintain it? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: I recently installed a small pondless water feature. How do I maintain it?

Q: I recently installed a small pondless water feature. How do I maintain it?

Paul- Moab, UT

A: I recently installed a small pondless water feature. How do I maintain it?

As you’ve likely discovered, a pondless water feature makes a fantastic addition to a landscape. Whether it’s a bubbling fountain, a colorful birdbath or a disappearing waterfall, pondless features deliver the tranquil sound of running water without the hassle.

Small water features are easy to keep, but you will need to do some simple chores. Here’s a quick checklist to follow:

  1. Remove the Debris: Dust will dirty the water feature, and debris may collect and start to break down, leaving behind a slimy mess. As needed, manually remove large debris and then add a dose of FeatureFix™ to the water as a cleaner. The highly concentrated product will safely eliminate accumulated debris and clear unsightly discoloration and stuck-on organic materials, often within 48 hours. (FeatureFix™ is not safe for use in features with fish, invertebrates or crustaceans, so use with caution.)
  2. Clear the Water: To keep your fountain flowing with clean, clear water, treat it regularly with FeatureClear™. The bacteria in this all-natural clarifier will digest organic debris to keep water crystal clear. Use every two weeks when water temperatures are above 50°F. Simply add one ounce for every 100 gallons of water for sparkling clean water without harmful chemicals. (FeatureClear™ is safe for use around fish, plants, pets and wildlife.)
  3. Top Off As Needed: In addition to keeping things clean and clear, also keep an eye on the water level in your pondless feature’s basin and top it off as needed.
  4. Inspect Mechanics, Connections: Periodically inspect your feature’s pump, tubing and connections to ensure that they are sound and functioning correctly.

With winter approaching, be cautious about running your pondless fountain. It will sure look cool, flowing or bubbling away in the frosty air, but freezing temperatures and ice formations can do some serious damage. If you decide to shut it down until spring, remove the pump from the basin, place it in a bucket with water and store it in a place that will not freeze. Be sure to leave water in the basin so the ground won’t shift.

Pond Talk: How do you winterize your pondless water feature?

Keep Water Features Clean - Pond Logic(r) FeatureClear(t) & FeatureFix(t) Combo

Will I need to top off my pond this winter? If so, how do I stop my hose from freezing? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Will I need to top off my pond this winter? If so, how do I stop my hose from freezing?

Q: Will I need to top off my pond this winter? If so, how do I stop my hose from freezing?

Kirsten – Kalispell, MT

A: Though water fluctuations seem more pronounced in the summertime, winter water loss in your pond will happen. When it does, you’ll need to top it off – but access to liquid water can be a challenge in northern climates where landscapes freeze over.

Reasons for Winter Water Loss

Before we get into how to turn up the heat in your water garden, let’s take a look at why water loss happens during the cold season. It can be caused by the following:

  • Low humidity: When the air contains little moisture, evaporation rates increase as the dry air will absorb the water (frozen or not) from your pond.
  • Windy conditions: Wind can also escalate evaporation in your pond. A 5-mile-per-hour wind at your pond’s surface, for instance, results in roughly three times the rate of evaporation on a still day.
  • Ice expansion, formation: Because frozen water takes up more space than liquid water, it will appear that the volume dissipates in your pond as ice forms and expands.

A small amount of water level fluctuation is OK – but if your pond is very shallow (18 to 24 inches or less) and stocked with fish, keep a very close eye on your water level. A few inches of water loss could leave your fish in ice!

Topping It Off

If your pond’s water level drops more than an inch, you’ll need to top it off. But how do you do that if the pond is covered in a sheet of ice, or if the water in your hose freezes solid as soon as you turn on the spigot?

First, you’ll have to break through the ice. To crack through it, remember to never use a drill, hammer or other blunt object, as the subsurface vibrations could harm your fish. Instead, fill a bucket with hot water and pour it on one area of the pond to melt open a hole in the ice, preferably near the edge.

Next, use the heated K&H™ PVC Thermo-Hose™ to fill up your pond through the hole. The thermostatically controlled hose prevents ice from forming in your faucet or hose. The unit’s built-in heating elements turn on automatically when temperatures dip below freezing so you’ll have liquid water coming out of your hose.

You can use the Thermo-Hose™ two ways: either keep it plugged into a power source all winter, or use it as-needed by plugging it in 30 minutes before use. Either way, hook it up to the spigot or water source only when in use and unhook it when you’re done.

Pond Talk: How much water loss do you experience in your pond over the winter?

Keep Your Water Flowing - K&H (t) PVC Thermo-Hose(t)

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