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Should I add submerged plants to my Water Garden? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

Should I add submerged plants to my Water Garden?

Should I add submerged plants to my Water Garden?
Stacey – Grand Rapids, MI

Let’s face it: floating and surface plants, like lilies and hyacinths, are the rock stars of any water garden. They’re the show-offs, the preeners, the colorful ones that visitors “ooh” and “aah” over; the divas that pond owners proudly feature on center stage.

But, may we ask, where would the rock star be without his support crew – the techies, the roadies, the groupies? Still playing air guitar in front of his mirror, that’s where. Lilies, hyacinths and the like just happen to be the most visible and attractive feature of a supportive ecosystem that should include their plainer relatives – the Submerged plants, like Vallisneria, Red Ludwigia, Hornwort and Parrot’s Feather. These worker plants compete with algae for the nitrogen produced by decaying plants and fish waste,produce oxygen to help keep the pond properly aerated,andprovide shade and shelter for koi and other fish. Submerged plants may not be flashy, but they’re a critical component in maintaining water quality and general pond health.

The easiest way to add one of these workers to your water garden is to plant its stems in a Laguna Submersible Pond Planting Basket along with an ample supply of Microbe-Lift® Aquatic Planting Media, and place it on the bottom of the pond. The baskets come in various sizes with mesh sides and bottoms – this allows the plant to seek nourishment outside the basket, without the risk of growing out of control.

Any performer will tell you that a well-fed support crew is a happy support crew. So to make sure your Submerged plants are getting the nutrition they need, we highly recommend the Laguna Temperature Activated Aquatic Fertilizer Spikes, a verbal mouthful that also delivers the goods. Simply push a spike into to the soil near the plant until the cap is just above the surface and you’re all set for a year.

So, by all means, add Submerged plants to your water garden and let your lilies rock on!

Pond Talk: Do you utilize submerged plants in your pond?

Submerged Plants for Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens

My pond water is green. Do UVs really work? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

My pond water is green, do UV’s really work?

My pond water is green, do UV’s really work?
Summer – Baton Rouge, LA

The short answer? Yes. While it might seem like smoke and mirrors, UVs help to consolidate algae particles, which are then removed through regular filtration. And because planktonic algae particles are typically responsible for green pond water, products like our all-in-one ClearSolution™ Filter and AllClear™ systems – which include UVs within their filters – and our PowerUV™ Clarifiers – which can be added inline with your existing plumbing – are terrific resources to help keep pond water clear and clean. Bear in mind, though, that UV can’t work miracles, and has no impact on string algae.

Now that we’ve established the fact that UVs really do work, there’s an even bigger issue to consider. The presence of planktonic algae is, after all, a symptom of a larger issue – and UVs are simply a means to treat it. In order to reduce reliance on UVs and filtration, it’s important to consider the cause of the bloom.

Planktonic algae bloom in nutrient-rich water. Nutrients can come in a variety of forms. There are many culprits – including excessive fish food, an overabundance of fish (and the waste they produce), bird droppings, and even runoff from fertilized lawns. When too many of those nutrients are in your pond, algae – which are present in all water – multiply quickly to take advantage of what they see as a free lunch. When algae multiplies, a cycle begins which depletes oxygen, and can harm or kill both fish and beneficial aquatic plants. So take stock of your pond. Evaluate the number of fish you have – and adjust your feeding levels accordingly. If your pond is overpopulated, consider reducing the number of fish, and the corresponding waste they produce.

Finally, consider using our PondLogic® DefensePAC®, which helps to improve water quality, eliminate muck and built-up debris, and to enhance fish health. With quick and easy application, you’ll see noticeable results in no time – and with minimal effort.

Pond Talk: Have you encountered green water in your pond? How did you remedy the situation?

The Pond Guy® Clear Solution 4-in-1 Pond Filtration System

I have a waterfall in my pond, is that enough aeration? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

I have a waterfall in my pond, is that enough aeration?

I have a waterfall in my pond, is that enough aeration?
Robert – Racine, WI

Waterfalls are one of nature’s greatest creations. In addition to providing breathtaking beauty and places for daredevils to kayak and – for some inexplicable reason – ride over in padded barrels, they serve as massive aeration systems, introducing fresh oxygen into the ecosystem that fish and plants need to thrive. In backyard ponds, waterfalls serve many of the same functions – but their scale is often inadequate to provide sufficient aeration. They also fall a bit short as places for kayakers and barrel riders to strut their stuff.

So, while your backyard waterfall definitely helps to keep water oxygenated, additional aeration is always helpful – especially when algae begins to grow, and fish are faced with warming water and reduced oxygen levels. To provide the aeration any backyard pond needs, we strongly recommend our KoiAir™ and PondAir™ Aeration Systems. With a wide variety of options available for ponds of every size and depth, these systems help to increase circulation and reduce stratification to provide the healthiest possible environment for fish and decorative plants.

For signs that your pond’s aeration is insufficient, look for increases in muck and debris at the pond bottom. When properly aerated, muck is broken up naturally, leaving the bottom clean and the water clear. If you have fish, and they surface regularly or gather beneath a waterfall, your aeration may be inadequate. If that’s the case, you’ll give your fish cause for celebration by installing additional aeration – and you’ll have the satisfaction of a clean, clear pond that makes your backyard the perfect sanctuary.

Pond Talk: Do you run a separate aeration system in your pond?

Airmax® PondAir™

How many and what type of plants should I have in my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

How many and what type of plants should I have in my pond?

Q: How many and what type of plants should I have in my pond?
Bryce – Myrtle Beach, SC

If you’re a person – and we’re going out on a limb here to assume you are – you understand the importance of eating a balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, grains and proteins. Variety, it seems, is more than just the spice of life. Like you, your water garden thrives on variety – in the form of a carefully selected mix of aquatic plants. But just as overeating is harmful to you, over-planting spells trouble for your pond. So, whether you’re dining or planting, it pays to be prudent.

Ideal plant coverage is around 60% of your featured surface – this allows for enough nutrient absorption to help prevent algae from gaining a foothold in your pond. There are many types of water plants to choose from – bog plants, marginal plants, lilies, floating and submerged plants – and frankly, we recommend that you try and use them all because each type of plant brings a little something different to the water table if you get our drift.

For instance, submerged plants, like Hornwort or Anacharis, are oxygenators, providing critical support to a pond’s eco-system by supplementing the water with oxygen, while floating plants, like the water hyacinth, provide shade that cools the water and cover under which fish can hide.

Our customers have found The Pond Guy® Choice Hardy Water Lilies, make lovely additions to their ponds. Position the root of the plant in a container of Microbe-Lift® Aquatic Planting Media, and locate the water lily so that its floating leaves are away from any splashing water for best results.

Blue Flag Iris, Water Hibiscus and Bog Bean are all lovely examples of bog plants that can be placed around the shallow edges of your pond for both aesthetic and ecological reasons. To keep your water garden in healthy, we suggest you treat your plants once a year to such products as the Laguna Temperature Activated Aquatic Plant Fertilizer Spikes or the nitrate and phosphate free supplement Bloom & Grow™, formulated specifically for aquatic plants.

There’s no doubt about it: variety is the spice of life. It’s also the sign of a healthy, well-cared for pond.

Pond Talk: What types of plants do you have in your pond?

The Pond Guy® Choice Hardy Water Lilies

I like the idea of a pond but will it also bring more mosquitos? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

I like the idea of a pond but will it also bring more mosquitos?

I like the idea of a pond but will it also bring more mosquitos?
Crystal – Baton Rouge, LA

If pondkeeping were a recipe for multiplying mosquitoes, it would be tough to justify having a pond at all. Fortunately, the same things that make a pond attractive to you make it an unwelcome spot for mosquitoes looking to settle down and start a family.

Mosquitoes, it seems, like prefer to lay their larva in stagnant water. As it turns out, ponds are much healthier and more attractive when they’re well aerated. The benefits of aeration are twofold. First, aeration helps gases produced by the breakdown of organic matter to dissipate naturally – which in turn eliminates the potential for unpleasant pond odor. Second – and very importantly – a well-aerated pond is a lousy place for mosquito larvae. That’s why so many of our customers turn to our PondAir™ and KoiAir™ Aeration Systems.

For pondkeepers who prefer a more dramatic display of mosquito-beating aeration, we recommend our 4-In-1 Pond Filtration System. In addition to the oxygenating benefits of aeration, these pumps double as fountains, sending up a spray of water to keep you entertained – while keeping mosquitoes at bay.

Under some circumstances, aeration isn’t a viable alternative. In those cases, our Mosquito Bits® and Mosquito Dunks® offer a safe, EPA-approved means to kill mosquito larva for up to 30 days.

So don’t let the threat of mosquitoes stand between you and your pond. Give them the fight of their lives – and we’ll do everything we can to make sure you come out ahead.

Pond Talk: Have you battled mosquitoes around your pond? How did you keep them away?

Airmax® PondAir™ Aeration Systems

Should I eradicate all algae from my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

Should I eradicate all algae from my pond?

Should I eradicate all algae from my pond?
Suzanne – Arlington, VA

In a word, the simple answer to this question is no. Algae serves a vital role in the health of your pond, providing both natural filtration and food for fish and wildlife. Algae also looks aesthetically pleasing in a pond, provided there’s not too much of it.

To better understand algae’s place in your pond, it’s important to know the different types that are common. First, there’s filamentous algae. Often referred to as “pond scum,” growth of filamentous algae typically begins on the pond bottom. As it grows, it rises to the surface, and can quickly spread to cover the entire pond if not controlled.

String algae is the second variety of algae pond owners will invariably come to know. Essentially a variation on filamentous algae, this algae isn’t harmful, but its rapid growth can quickly take over the pond if it’s not controlled. Frequently seen on rocks in waterfalls, string algae has been known to double its mass in 24 hours when conditions are right – leaving little room for beneficial algae growth, and inhibiting the growth of beneficial bacteria and plants.

Where filamentous alga are generally unwelcome in most ponds, planktonic algae is its beneficial counterpart. Planktonic algae generally thrives within the first few feet from the surface, where it relies on light for photosynthesis – and produces food for microscopic pond dwellers and newly-hatched fry. While typically desirable in ponds, planktonic algae can bloom, and some forms can be toxic to animals. In those circumstances, special measures may be necessary to control its growth.

In order to maintain a healthy balance of algae growth in your pond, there are a few simple steps that go a long way. First, consider our Airmax® KoiAir™ and PondAir™ Water Garden Aeration Systems to ensure sufficient aeration. Stagnant water is an open invitation for excessive algae growth. Even if you have a waterfall, consider adding one to increase water circulation. For more aggressive algae treatment, our an algaecide such as AlgaeFix® to kill the algae and then follow up with the Pond Logic® DefensePAC®. And as a precautionary measure, consider adding a selection of Aquatic Plants to help maintain your pond’s equilibrium, to reduce excessive algae-promoting sunlight, and to provide safe havens for fish.

Pond Talk: What type of algae do you battle most?

Pond Logic® DefensePAC®

What do I do to clean out my water garden now that the snow melted? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

What do I do to clean out my water garden now that the snow melted?

What do I do to clean out my water garden now that the snow melted?
Brett – Delta, IA

Spring is the perfect time to perform a clean out on your water garden or decorative water feature and remove accumulated growth and debris from the winter months. Not only does this result in a cleaner better looking pond, it also promotes a smoother transition into the warm summer months where a unbalanced pond can easily be overrun with green water and string algae.

Once the ice melts from the surface of your pond you can begin your cleaning regimen. Start by pulling out as much muck and debris as possible. You can use a Interchangeable Pond Tool to safely remove your decorative pond fish and sweep debris away from the sides of the pond. Pond Vacuums are a great way to siphon muck and debris from hard to reach areas of your pond without the hassle of bending and scrubbing. Sprinkle Oxy-Lift™ Defense® on your waterfall rocks and stream bed to lift stuck on debris without having to scrape at your rocks and liner.

After the majority of debris are cleaned from the pond you can perform a partial water change by removing around 20% of the ponds volume and replacing it with fresh water. Not only does this refresh the pond water, removing water from the pond with a pump or bucket will also eliminate some of the floating debris you kicked up during the cleaning process. While the pond is refilling mix in some Water Conditioner to remove the harmful metals and chloramines found in well and tap water.

Remove your Filter Media Pads from your waterfall filter, skimmer and pressurized filters. Inspect them for signs of wear and tear and replace accordingly. Thoroughly rinse your filtration media to remove built up debris. Apply PL-Gel to your new or cleaned filter media to seed them with beneficial bacteria and place them back into position.

Now that the pond is cleaned up and topped off you can start up your pumps and begin circulating the contents of the pond. Inspect the pumps, plumbing and power cords for signs of wear, cuts or leakage. Check your waterfall and streams for out of place rocks, splash-outs, and misdirected water. Black Waterfall Foam can be used to keep rocks firmly in place and route water where you want it. Inspect your pond liner for leaks and check the perimeter of your pond for damp areas or puddles.

If the water is still below 55 degrees apply your Pond Logic® Seasonal Defense® to balance the pond water and introduce beneficial bacteria to the water column. If the water warmer than 55 degrees you can apply your Nature’s Defense® instead. The Pond Logic® DefensePAC® bundles the water treatment and maintenance products you will need for the season while providing a price break compared to purchasing products individually.

Let the pond water circulate for a couple days before re-introducing your decorative pond fish back into the pond. This will give the pond water some time to balance without putting unnecessary stress on your fish. Add some Stress Reducer PLUS to the water before you start acclimating your decorative pond fish back into the pond as it will help supplement their slime coat and reduce exposure to stress and harmful residual water contaminates.

While it requires a little elbow grease up front, a thorough spring clean out will save you time, money and hassles later in the season so you can spend more time enjoying your pond while the weather is nice.

Pond Talk:What are you tips for getting your water garden ready for the season?

DefensePAC®

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