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My water is brown, what should I do? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

My water is brown. What should I do?

My water is brown. What should I do?
Andrew – Memphis, TN

Before we can answer that question, you’ll have to do some sleuthing. Why? Because water that looks brown many not actually be brown. Fortunately, there’s a simple way to figure it out – and there are simple ways to clear up the issue – regardless how the test turns out.

The test, of course, is highly scientific, so pay careful attention to the following steps:

Get a clear glass from your kitchen cabinet.
Take the glass to your pond, and scoop it full of pond water.
Look at the water in the glass.

Whew. Good work. Now that you’ve completed the heavy lifting, consider the water you’re observing. If it’s clear, you’ve learned that the brown you’re seeing is nothing more than the decaying leaves and debris at the bottom of your pond. To remedy that problem, you’ll want to introduce the natural bacteria in Pond Logic® Muck Defense and Pond Logic® Nature Defense to your pond. These safe, hungry and beneficial bacteria will expedite the breakdown of pond bottom debris, leaving the bottom of your pond as clean as your water is clear.

If, however, the contents of your glass are brown, you’re facing a high concentration of tannins, which are released into pond water by decomposing leaves. Fortunately, our Pond Logic® Activated Carbon does a terrific job of absorbing pesky tannins, leaving your water crystal clear. Simply place Activated Carbon in a mesh bag close to a high-flow area (like a skimmer or a waterfall), and wait for it to absorb the offending discoloration.

When the water clears, you might just find that the tannin-rich water has been hiding a collection of leaves and debris at the pond bottom. But with a dose of Muck Defense or Nature Defense, you’ll have things cleared up in no time at all.

Pond Talk: Have you noticed brown water forming in your pond?

Activated Carbon

What else lives in my pond besides fish? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

What else lives in my pond besides fish?

What else lives in my pond besides fish?
James – Ida, MI

If you were scientifically inclined, you could spend a lot of time considering the complexities of a backyard pond. Despite their apparent simplicity, there’s a lot more going on in your pond than you might suspect.

The water in most ponds is stratified into different layers. While this effect is more pronounced in ponds with depths of eight feet or greater, even a shallow pond will demonstrate some degree of layering. The layers are generally defined by differences in temperature. In summer, the stratification is at its most pronounced, with lower temperatures and dissolved oxygen levels at the lower layers. In fall, the levels tend to equalize. In winter, the layering reverses, with cold water on top and warmer water at the bottom. Spring mirrors fall, with temperatures equalizing again before summer turns the entire process on its head once again.

Because dissolved oxygen levels vary according to water temperature, different layers are more attractive to different organisms. Some plant life, including algae, thrives in warmer, more oxygen-rich waters. Fish prefer consistency, and will gravitate toward water that balances cool temperature and an adequate supply of oxygen. Different types of bacteria – both beneficial and otherwise – will choose their own level. And frogs, cold-blooded creatures that they are, seek out warmth all year ‘round.

External conditions can significantly impact stratification. A heavy rain or an extended period of unseasonably cool weather, for example, can temporarily cool upper layers during summer months. This process can stress fish stocks.

Fortunately, aeration solutions like our Airmax Aeration Systems go a long way toward reducing the impact of layering in a backyard pond. When water is aerated, temperatures and oxygen levels stay uniform – making the pond safe and healthy for fish, beneficial bacteria and friendly plant life.

While they’re invisible to the eye, beneficial bacteria are a form of life every pond needs to stay clean, clear and healthy for fish and plants. With the regular use of Pond Logic® MuckAway™ Pond Muck Reducer and Pond Logic® PondClear™ Beneficial Bacteria, you’ll enhance the natural decomposition process that eliminates pond debris and fallen leaves – and increase the healthy oxygen levels necessary to sustain fish and plants all season long.

Pond Talk: Have you noticed different layers of water (with varying temperatures) in your pond?

Airmax Aeration

We just constructed out pond, how long should we wait to add fish? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

We just constructed out pond, how long should we wait to add fish?

We just constructed out pond, how long should we wait to add fish?

Jay – Phoenix, AZ

When you create a new pond, you’re effectively building a new ecosystem from scratch. At the beginning, your pond’s waters might look clean, clear and inviting, but nature’s just getting started. Until the initial nitrogen cycle is complete, there’s still work to be done before fish can safely take up residence.

At its early stages, any new body of water – whether an indoor aquarium or a backyard pond – goes through the nitrogen cycle. This cycle begins when living organisms break down nitrogen through their natural digestive processes. Until that cycle is complete, concentrations of ammonia naturally build up in the water – and too much ammonia is extremely harmful to fish. Fortunately, with the introduction of natural bacteria in products like ourPond Logic® DefensePAC® to your pond, you can speed up the nitrogen cycle, making the pond safe for new fish in four to six weeks or less.

In addition to DefensePAC, other products like Pond Logic® Stress Reducer Plus and Pond Logic® Water Conditioner go a long way toward making new pond water inhabitable. Stress Reducer Plus helps fish to restore their natural protective slime coats, making them less vulnerable to illness. Water Conditioner helps to neutralize chlorine and other chemicals in the water that can lead to stress.

But simply adding DefensePAC, Stress Reducer and Water Conditioner won’t tell you when your water is ready to support piscine life. For that, you’ll want to use our PondCare Master Liquid Test Kit, which tests water for pH, ammonia, and nitrite. When readings are consistently within healthy ranges – as clearly explained in the Master Liquid Test Kit’s documentation – you’re ready to welcome your new fish to their new home.

Pond Talk: Have you recently built a pond and are waiting to add fish?

DefensePAC

Is there an ideal temperature to treat algae? | Pond & Lake Q&A

Is there an ideal temperature to treat algae?

Is there an ideal temperature to treat algae?

Crystal – New Baltimore, MI

It depends what you mean by the word “treat.” If you’re looking to throw a party in its honor, pretty much any temperature will do – because algae grows all year ‘round, even during the winter months. But if you’re hoping to give it the kind of treatment that makes it feel extremely unwelcome, you’ll see the best results when water temperatures are at 50 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. When water is warmer, algae tends to thrive. Because it’s thriving, it’s feeding – making it much more susceptible to algaecides.

Because very few of our customers express interest in enhancing algae growth, we’ll assume most readers are in the latter category. And if you are, we have a variety of highly effective options to accomplish your objectives. Pond Logic Algae Defense Algaecide with Cide-Kick™ is among our safest, most effective weapons in the battle against algae. Algae Defense is a fast-acting aquatic algaecide, and it’s highly effective at eliminating a broad spectrum of pond algae. By including Cide-Kick, which breaks down algae’s natural defenses, this combination packs a particularly effective double-whammy, and makes short work of offending algae blooms.

For spot-treatment of algae growth, we also recommend Applied Biochemists Cutrine®-Plus Granular Algaecide. Formulated to make quick work of both surface and bottom-forming algae, this safe, powerful algaecide does double-duty by both killing existing algae, and inhibiting its future growth.

While some pond owners prefer to eschew algaecide and rake algae out manually, the raking-only approach requires much more maintenance and attention. Algae are extremely hearty, and raking leaves trace amounts in the pond, allowing for recurrent blooms. For longer-lasting impact, the ideal treatment includes the use of algaecides, followed by cutting with our Aquatic Weed Cutter, raking with our Aquatic Weed Rake, and follow-up treatment with natural bacteria to break down any remaining muck.

Give your algae the treatment they deserve before temperatures start to fall – and start next season with a leg up on their plans for next year’s invasion.

Pond Talk: What method of treatment have you used to maintain algae?

Algae Defense

When should I switch my fish food? | Decorative Pond & Water Garden Q&A

When should I switch my fish food?

When should I switch my fish food?

Jordyn – Milwaulkee, WI

If you’re eating fish food, you should probably consider switching it right away. I recommend pizza. Unless, of course, you’re a fish – which, for the purposes of this post, we’ll assume you are.

Fish, as you probably know, are extremely susceptible to seasonal cycles, and the environmental changes they bring. When gauging the best time to transition from one type of food to another, it’s vital to monitor water temperature – which, when you use our Pond Logic Floating Pond Thermometer, is a snap. The second, more subtle indicator is fish behavior. When water temperatures drop below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, fish movement become slower and more sluggish, or they’re eating significantly less, it’s time to switch to a wheat germ-based food like Pond Logic Spring & Fall Fish Food.

When fish ease toward their dormant months, wheat germ-based food provides easily-digestible nutrition, and ensures that your fish won’t go dormant with undigested food in their bellies. Because undigested food decomposes over time, it poses a serious health risk to fish, and can release toxins into their systems that can result in sickness – and even fish loss. When using our Spring & Fall Fish Food, you can continue to feed your fish safely, without exposing them to unnecessary risk of illness.

When water temperatures drop into the 40s or fish stop eating altogether, it’s time to stop feeding, allowing fish to settle in safely for their long winter’s nap.

Pond Talk: What signs do you fish give you to signal they are ready to relax for the winter?

Pond Logic Spring & Fall Fish Food

What causes fog to form on the pond during the fall? | Pond & Lake Q&A

What causes fog to form on the pond during the fall?

What causes fog to form on the pond during the fall?

Grayson – Three Rivers, MI

When you make the decision to add a water feature to your backyard, the positives are countless. They’re calming. They’re beautiful. They’re satisfying. They’re challenging. And sometimes, they’re downright educational. Today’s post falls in the latter category. And for the next couple of paragraphs, we’ll discuss your pond’s potential as a weathermaker.

As everyone knows, fog is nothing more than a concentration of water vapor in the air. When fall rolls around, air temperatures cool faster than the water in your pond. When a cold layer of still air settles over your pond – typically during overnight hours – warm water vapor from the pond enters the cool air above it. The cool air then traps the concentrated water vapor in place, and fog forms. As the day wears on, and air temperatures rise, the water vapor evaporates and dispels – clearing the air until night falls, and temperatures follow suit.

Some people, particularly those who wax nostalgic about the Pacific Northwest or Sherlock Holmes-ian London, love the subtle mystery of their pond’s morning fog. But others like things crystal clear. Fortunately, with the installation of a Kasco or Aqua Control Fountain, the fog fighters can have things their way – all year ‘round.

Fountains serve several purposes. They provide vital aeration, enriching pond waters with the oxygen fish and plants need to thrive. They also create air movement above the water, preventing cool air from settling in, and eliminating the potential for fogging. So, whether you’re for fog or against it, you can always have your pond, your way, each and every day of the year.

Pond Talk: Have you noticed fog on your pond yet this year?

Kasco Fountains

There are so many different types of pond lights. How many do I need – and which are the easiest to install? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

There are so many different types of pond lights. How many do I need – and which are the easiest to install?

There are so many different types of pond lights. How many do I need – and which are the easiest to install?
Fernando – Garden City, SC

It’s true. Although it seems like it should be simple, the sheer variety of available pond lights can make it a bit daunting to choose what’s right for your needs. But in truth, that’s where it starts: decide exactly what you want to light – and how – and the choices sort of narrow themselves. So take a moment to think about what you’re trying to illuminate. A waterfall? A fountain? A spitter? The whole pond?

As luck would have it, we have options to fit all of your pond lighting needs. For submerged waterfall lighting, our Halogen Waterfall Light is fully waterproof, and exceptionally easy to install. For more generalized lighting both underwater and around the pond, our HalogenMini™ 3-Pack Halogen Light Kits are simple to install, and they offer the added appeal of colored lenses for a lively, customized look. For greater energy efficiency and exceptionally long bulb life, our LEDPro™ 36 – 3 Pack Warm LED Light Kit is the ideal choice. These lights can be installed in or out of the water. Because LED bulbs can last for up to 100,000 hours, they’re essentially maintenance free. Regardless which light kit you choose, installation is simple. Our transformers are designed with quick disconnect fittings – and there’s no need to recruit an electrician to get your pond wired and ready.

Once you’ve identified your specific pond lighting needs, you should also spend a moment pondering the stage of your pond’s construction – and the flexibility you’re hoping to achieve. If your pond is brand new, or if it’s currently drained, it greatly simplifies the process of installing underwater lights. If it’s not, you may want to consider an installation without submerged lights. Through some creative design, the effect can be every bit as dramatic.

If you’re planning to automate your pond lighting, you may also want to consider installing timers, or photocells that trigger lights when darkness falls – without any need to flip a switch.

Pond Talk: What type of accent lighting do you have in your pond?

LEDPro™ 36 – 3 Pack Warm LED Light Kit

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