• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

I’ve tried sprays and other types of bug control. Is there anything else I can do to reduce the mosquitoes by my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I’ve tried sprays and other types of bug control. Is there anything else I can do to reduce the mosquitoes by my pond?

Q: I’ve tried sprays and other types of bug control. Is there anything else I can do to reduce the mosquitoes by my pond?

Nancy – Lima, OH

A: Nothing ruins a pondside shindig faster than a swarm of blood-thirsty mosquitoes. The buzzing, biting, irritating bugs are the bane of pond owners. Besides causing itchy welts, these little pests can transmit dangerous and deadly diseases, like malaria, dengue, yellow fever, West Nile virus, dog heartworm and equine encephalitis.

Yep, they’re a nuisance—but their population can be controlled. Here’s what we recommend.

Remove Food Source

Ponds with lots of plant matter and algae are perfect for feeding baby mosquitoes. Those little wigglers and tumblers (technical terms for developing mosquito larvae and pupae) gobble through the greens, but you can minimize their feeding frenzy by maintaining your pond and eliminating their food source.

Move the Water

A female mosquito prefers to lay her eggs in stagnant water that’s full of algae, plankton, fungi and bacteria, so your next plan of attack should be to churn the water with a fountain, like our AquaStream™ Fountain, or an Airmax® Aeration System near the area where you sit. The waves will make her think twice about calling that part of your pond home.

Grasses Be Gone

Because adult mosquitoes live among the debris surrounding your pond, you want to keep those grasses cleared out. Use some herbicide, like Shoreline Defense®, to kill aquatic weeds and grasses. And pull out your weed removal tools, like your weed cutter, rake and debris skimmer, and remove the dead plants, overgrowth and other potential hiding spots – at least in the area where you hang out most often.

Help from Finned Friends

Mosquito-eating pond life, like tadpoles, minnow, bass, bluegill and catfish, love noshing on the little larvae and pupae. If you don’t already have a fish population living in your lake, consider adding some! The American Mosquito Control Association, in fact, recommends adding predacious minnows or native fish to lakes and ponds for biological control of the insects.

Use Mosquito Dunks or Bits

Mosquito dunks or bits are a lifesaver for folks with still ponds and other standing water pools on their property. These handy little disks or bits contain Bt-israelensis (Bt-i), a specially formulated biological pesticide designed to kill mosquito larvae. You simply toss them in your pond or lake and they’ll provide relief for up to 30 days. Plus, they’re safe for use around wildlife, pets and humans.

Unfortunately, mosquitoes are part of life with a lake or pond. With some pond and landscape maintenance, aeration, water movement, biological control and, if necessary, chemical control, however, you can keep the buzzing swarms at bay.

Pond Talk: What are some other ways you’ve tried to control lakeside mosquitos?

Control Mosquitos Up To 30 Days - Summit® Mosquito Bits® & Dunks®

My pond is about a quarter acre, and I have ducks so I don’t want to use chemicals. Can I use barley straw? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: My pond is about a quarter acre, and I have ducks so I don’t want to use chemicals. Can I use barley straw?

Q: My pond is about a quarter acre, and I have ducks so I don’t want to use chemicals. Can I use barley straw?

Katie – Johnson, VT

A: More and more people are using barley straw as an all-natural (and duck friendly) way to control pond scum—and for good reason. Barley straw is a safe, natural alternative to manufactured chemicals and one of the compounds produced by submerged, decomposing barley straw may actually help keep your pond clear.

You need a lot of it to be effective.

In your quarter-acre pond, you’d need between 25 and 50 pounds (1 to 2 standard bales) of barley straw, depending on your pond’s condition. That straw would then need to be broken up, divided among several permeable bags and placed around the perimeter of the pond with weights in water no deeper than 6 feet.

That’s a lot of work!

And if you don’t replace the barley straw as it decomposes, it just turns into more decaying organic debris in the pond.

So what are your options?

Focus on the health of your pond. Reduce the decomposing plant matter, fish waste and other nutrients by adding a stout aeration system and wildlife-safe beneficial bacteria.

Reconsider manufactured chemicals, like Algae Defense®. The algaecide has no water use restrictions, and it’s safe to use around ducks and other wildlife. And because it only needs to be used when algae growth is occurs, you could use it as a one-time algae bomb. Not all chemicals are bad!

But if you want to give barley straw a try, check out this “fact sheet,” provided by The Ohio State University Extension. It details everything you need to know about using barley straw.

Pond Talk: Have you ever used barley straw? How did it work in your pond or lake?

Promote A Healthy Ecosystem - Pond Logic® PondClear™ Natural Bacteria

I have an old sump pump. Can I use it to create a fountain for my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I have an old sump pump. Can I use it to create a fountain for my pond?

Q: I have an old sump pump. Can I use it to create a fountain for my pond?

Nick – Linwood, KS

A: Sounds like you want to do some “upcycling” and save a little money while making use of old equipment that’s sitting around. What a fun project, and something you can show off to your friends!

Yes, you can certainly transform that old sump pump into a fountain for your pond – but whether it works will depend on what you want to do with that fountain.

Sump Pump Fountain?

A sump pump is traditionally used to remove water that’s collected in a basement. It pumps the water away from the house to a place where it’s no longer problematic. It’s not really designed for long-term continuous use, and so using a sump pump to create a spraying fountain might decrease its life expectancy. Replacing it could be costly.

There are other factors to consider, too. A sump pump might cost more to operate. You’ll still need to create a way to anchor or suspend the motor and create a spray. And you’ll need to extend the power cord long enough to reach a power source safely – which will require trial and error or fancy engineering.

If you’re a build-it-yourselfer in search of a challenge and plan to not use it for long-term continuous use, go for it! If not, consider purchasing an actual fountain.

Out-of-the-Box Easy

For those who are looking for an easy, cost-effective and trouble-free way to add some splash to a pond, buying a pre-manufactured decorative fountain has its benefits, including:

  • They come with pumps that are designed to be used as a fountain, so they create much more water movement and a heavier spray that’s less affected by wind and pump-clogging floating debris.
  • They can be used as an aeration system in ponds less than 6 feet deep.
  • All the engineering work is done for you! After a quick installation, you’ll have a decorative spray and a power cord that’s long enough to reach the shore.
  • Some, like the AquaStream™ Fountain and Light Combo Kits, come with decorative options, like lights and different spray patterns.

Whichever you choose, it’s always a great idea to create movement and aerate the water. Your fish and plants will appreciate it, and you – and your guests – will, too!

Pond Talk: Have you ever made a decorative fountain with upcycled pieces and parts?

Enjoy the Sound of a Fountain - The Pond Guy® AquaStream™ 1/2 HP Fountain

A friend suggested I use pond dye. I’m nervous because we swim in the pond. Is it safe, and which one do I use? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: A friend suggested I use pond dye. I’m nervous because we swim in the pond. Is it safe, and which one do I use?

Q: A friend suggested I use pond dye. I’m nervous because we swim in the pond. Is it safe, and which one do I use?

Wayne – Camden, NC

A: You have a wise friend! Pond Dye can provide some important benefits to your pond. It helps to shade the water from the sun’s rays, and create drama and aesthetic appeal in your landscape.

Safe and Non-Staining

If you’re worried about the dye coloring your skin when you swim, don’t worry: After 24 hours of being applied to the pond, the dye will not stain. The concentrated form, however, is a different story. It will turn your hands colors, so be sure to wear gloves and work clothes when adding dye to your pond.

Once mixed with the water in your pond, pond dye is completely safe for agriculture and irrigation purposes. Immediately after treatment, you can use your pond for recreation, fishing and other activities. It’s safe for swimming ponds, as well as watering horses, livestock, birds, pets, fish and wildlife.

Color Choices Aplenty

Pond dye color is really a matter of personal preference, but different shades are better suited to different situations. When selecting one, first consider your environment and what looks natural in your surroundings. Then ask yourself these questions:

  • Do you have a decorative pond or lake? Try Nature’s Blue™ dye or The Pond Guy® PondShade™ Blue– our customers’ favorite choice. It’s the ideal color for large ponds that double as a view as it contrasts perfectly with lush green landscaping. Folks in the Great Lakes area may feel more at home with a natural blue color.
  • Do you prefer a more natural look? Try Twilight Blue™ dye. It maintains a neutral blackish-blue tint that shades and protects your pond without making drastic changes to its natural coloring.
  • Do you want to showcase your landscape? Consider using Black DyeMond™ dye. It creates a mirrored surface that reflects surrounding trees and natural rocky landscapes, making it perfect for natural ponds in wooded areas.

Application Process

Adding dye to your pond or lake is easy. Every four to six weeks (or as needed depending on rainfall and evaporation), simply pour the concentrated Pond Dye into the water in several spots along the pond’s edge, or drop the easy-to-use water-soluble Pond Dye Packets in the water. Easy peasy!

If you notice your pond is full of suspended debris, you may want to try Pond Dye PLUS. It contains both dye and the beneficial bacteria that’s found in PondClear™, so it will both shade your pond and help clear the water.

Pond Talk: What’s your favorite shade of pond dye?

Convenient Water Soluble Packets - The Pond Guy® PondShade™ Blue

Do I just throw MuckAway tablets into the pond from the shore? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Do I just throw MuckAway tablets into the pond from the shore?

Q: Do I just throw MuckAway tablets into the pond from the shore?

Rich – Callahan, FL

A: MuckAway™ Pond Muck Reducer does a number on muck. The special blend of aerobic beneficial bacteria digests organic debris (a.k.a. muck), improves water clarity and eliminates noxious odors. The precision-release pellets are easy to use, and they’re perfect for battling built-up sludge anywhere in your pond.

But there is a way to best apply MuckAway™. Here’s what we recommend.

  • Disburse Evenly: Whether you’re using MuckAway™ near the shoreline or across your entire pond, the pellets will need to be spread evenly across the treatment area. Plan to use one scoop per 1,000 square feet.
  • Use a Boat: If you are treating the entire pond or lake, consider using a boat for uniform MuckAway™ dispersal. Individual tablets that are spread very far apart (tossed from the shore) will not have as dramatic an impact on muck as those that are densely and evenly distributed.
  • Consider MuckAway™ TL: A large pond or lake may need the super sludge-busting power of MuckAway™ TL Pond Muck Reducer. When used as directed, it’s designed to break down up to 2″ of muck per month!
  • Combine Forces: Many customers choose to use a one-two punch when contending with water clarity issues. They’ll use PondClear™ Beneficial Bacteria water soluble packets to clean and clear the water column, and MuckAway™ or MuckAway™ TL to break down the sunken muck around often-used areas, like the pond perimeter and beach areas.

You can increase the effectiveness of MuckAway™ and MuckAway™ TL by raking out any large, long-to-decompose debris from the pond before you begin treatments. This allows those aerobic beneficial bacteria to target the fine debris that’s difficult to remove.

Airmax® Aeration is also key to helping your bacteria be more effective at battling muck. The moving, aerated water provides both oxygen and circulation, which creates an ideal environment for MuckAway™ or MuckAway™ TL to flourish. Looking for proof? Check out our Fox Lake Field Study. It shows the results of what happens to muck when MuckAway™ TL and aeration are used together.

Pond Talk: How do you use MuckAway™ in your pond or lake?

Remove Up To 5 Inches of Muck Per Year - Pond Logic® MuckAway™

The ice just melted and algae is already growing. Can I use an algaecide this early in the year? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The ice just melted and algae is already growing. Can I use an algaecide this early in the year?

Q: The ice just melted and algae is already growing. Can I use an algaecide this early in the year?

Jeff – Avilla, IN

A: After a dreary, cold winter, growing greenery is a welcome sight – unless it’s algae in your pond. Bright sunshine, warmer temperatures, and an abundance of nutrients nurture the tiny organisms, and in no time they’ll turn your water into something resembling pea soup.

Algaecides are an effective solution, but they’ll only work if water temperatures are above 60 degrees Fahrenheit. So what can you do if it’s still chilly?

    1. Lightly Rake the Algae: Raking live algae isn’t typically recommended as it may encourage algae growth if it’s not all removed. However, if you’re contending with an enthusiastic algae bloom that’s taking over your lake, pull out your Pond & Beach Rake and lightly rake out the overgrowth.
    2. Add EcoBoost™, Pond Dye: After you’ve raked the live algae, follow up by adding EcoBoost™ and Pond Dye, which have no temperature restrictions. The beneficial bacteria booster in EcoBoost will enhance the growth of muck-destroying natural bacteria, while binding phosphates and adding trace minerals for your fish. The pond dye will limit the amount of sunshine that’s reaching into the pond.
    3. Increase Circulation: If you’ve removed your aeration system for the winter, now’s the time to get it out of storage, give it a tune-up, put it back in your pond and start it up. Here’s a quick primer on how to do it.

When water temperatures top 60 degrees F, you can destroy the algae with an algaecide like Algae Defense®. The fast-acting liquid combats floating filamentous algae, bottom-growing chara and planktonic algae that turn water green. Once the algae turns brown and dies, rake out the debris, and then add some natural bacteria, EcoBoost™ and pond dye – all of which are found in our all-in-one ClearPAC® PLUS Pond Care Package. It’s an easy way to manage your growing spring problem!

Pond Talk: What improvements are you planning on doing to your pond or lake this year?

Keep Your Pond Clean & Clear - Pond Logic® ClearPAC® PLUS

Are there any concerns using our pond if I fertilize the lawn? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Are there any concerns using our pond if I fertilize the lawn?

Q: Are there any concerns using our pond if I fertilize the lawn?

James – Augusta, GA

A: Lawn fertilizers can do beautiful things to your terrestrial landscape. They infuse the soil with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. They make the grass green and lush. They’re sometimes mixed with pesticides and selective herbicides, creating a bug and weed-free lawn. When used as directed, fertilizers give you an easy way to feed your meadows.

They do, however, have their down side – particularly if they find their way into your pond or lake.

The phosphorous found in lawn fertilizers can help feed algae growth in your pond. That algae growth, when left unchecked, can create pea-soup colored water, deplete its life-sustaining oxygen and harm your fish. That’s not all. Some lawn fertilizers contain other chemicals that may not be friendly to humans and your aquatic environment.

So how can you limit or prevent fertilizers from entering your pond?

  1. Divert storm water away from your pond: Some runoff will inevitably flow into your pond but, if possible, fashion trenches and canals that steer that storm water into the sewer system or an unused field.
  2. Find a fertilizer with low or no phosphorous: Fertilizer labels include three numbers that refer to their nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) levels. In a 5-3-4 fertilizer analysis, for instance, the “3” represents the amount of phosphorous; the higher the number, the more phosphorous in the mix. When shopping for a lawn fertilizer, choose one with the least amount of phosphorous.
  3. When fertilizing, stay at least 25 feet away from the pond’s edge: This will create a fertilizer-free barrier around your pond, thereby preventing the chemicals from leeching into the water.
  4. Use natural products that help cleanse organics from pond water: If algae blooms do happen in your pond, use natural products that contain nutrient-eating beneficial bacteria. The microorganisms found in products like Pond Logic® PondClear™ will break down the suspended debris and muck, while Pond Logic® EcoBoost™ Bacteria Enhancer binds and eliminates phosphates and other toxins.

If the chemicals found in lawn fertilizers concern you, consider using a more natural approach. You can keep your lawn lush and green with grass clippings, aged compost and organic fertilizers. Treat weeds with vinegar/water/soap mixture or corn gluten. Think “green” when feeding your lawn – your pond and its residents will thank you for it!

Pond Talk: How do you fertilize the grass surrounding your pond or lake?

Bind Phosphates & Other Toxins - Pond Logic® EcoBoost™

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 186 other followers