• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

Should I still be doing maintenance on my aeration system this time of year? | Pond & Lakes Q & A

Should I still be doing maintenance on my aeration system this time of year?

Should I still be doing maintenance on my aeration system this time of year?
Sharon – Farmington, MI

Your aeration system is a very important tool in keeping your pond clean and healthy throughout the entire year. Whether your are just starting your system up for the first time this season or have been aerating your pond all winter long there is never a bad time to do a quick maintenance check on your aeration equipment.

A lot of potential issues can be resolved just by visually inspecting your aeration unit. Regularly inspecting your aeration system’s pressure gauges, exposed airlines and cooling fans can help locate line blockages and worn or broken parts that could damage your aeration system if left unnoticed. If the airlines are blocked by ice or debris the pressure gauge on your aeration system will begin to climb. Once too much pressure builds up in the compressor a pressure relief valve will open to drain the air causing a loud “hissing” noise. No air is making it into your pond when this happens and your compressor will begin to overwork itself causing rapid wear and tear.
Your aeration system needs air to function properly. A clogged or dirty air filter will restrict the amount of air that enters your aeration system reducing performance. Furthermore, dust and debris that are allowed to pass through your air filter will travel into the compressor and wear out moving parts faster than usual reducing the life of your aerator. Check and clean your air filter regularly and replace the air filter element every 3 to 6 months.
When the ice completely thaws over your pond this spring it is a good idea to raise your aeration plates and inspect them for broken or missing parts. Airstones should be cleaned or replaced with membrane diffusers, and the connection between your airline and aeration plate should be checked and tightened if necessary. Compressor maintenance kits are available for Airmax® Aeration systems and should be installed every 3 to 5 years. These kits contain replacement parts for the wear and tear items in your compressor which break down and diminish performance over time. Each kit comes with instructions and images and is simple to install. If you do not feel up to the challenge or feel more comfortable having a professional install your maintenance kit you can contact a pond guy or gal toll free at 866-766-3710 to send your system in for maintenance.

Like a vehicle, your aeration system requires regular maintenance to keep it performing at its best. Keeping your aeration system clean and well maintained extends the lifespan of the unit and ensures your system is running as efficiently as possible.

Pond Talk: How often do you inspect and maintain your aeration systems. Have your regular inspections caught potential problems?

airmax® silentair™ air filter

I have an aeration system but the pond is frozen over, am I still getting aeration? | Pond & Lakes Q & A

I have an aeration system but the pond is frozen over, am I still getting aeration?

I have an aeration system but the pond is frozen over, am I still getting aeration?
Jenni – Monticello, NY

Even if you’ve been running your aeration system diligently throughout the winter to protect your fish, it is still possible for your pond freeze over. It is not uncommon for the cold weather to close up the holes created by your aeration system during a streak of particularly frigid winter days. Your pond is able to hold a substantial amount of oxygen which acts as a buffer for days where your pond is getting less than ideal air exchange. Even when frozen, your aeration system will continue to circulate and add oxygen to the water column. Typically a sunny or warmer day will provide the assistance your aeration system needs to re-establish ventilation holes in the ice and release any harmful gas that accumulated while the pond was frozen over.

If your pond stays frozen over for more than a week or two at a time you may want to consider using an ice auger to drill a couple holes in the ice around the perimeter of your pond. Do not venture out towards the center as your aeration system is constantly bubbling and weakening the ice. Never try to pound, crack or break through the ice to open a hole for air exchange as it will send pressure waves throughout the pond disrupting and possibly killing your fish. Positioning your aeration plates in shallower areas of your pond will make it easier for the surface water above the plate to remain open due to increased water movement reaching the pond’s surface.

If your pond still hasn’t thawed out with the help of warm weather, sunshine and shallow plate placement, your aeration system may be to blame. Inspect your aeration system to make it is properly functioning. If you are using an Airmax® Aeration System, make sure the air filter is clean and is being changed every 3 to 6 months. Check your pressure gauges and airlines for indications that the compressor is still producing adequate air flow. If your system is between 3 to 5 years old consider installing a maintenance kit which replaces all of the seals and wear and tear parts that lead to decreased system performance. If the pressure reads abnormally high it may indicate that your airlines are obstructed by ice or possibly pinched or crushed.

If your pond only stays frozen over for short periods of time there is no need to worry. The holes will open back up on their own and your pond will take care of the rest naturally. Continue to regularly inspect your aeration system for signs of trouble and ALWAYS exercise caution when venturing near the ice. Make sure there is a floatation device present at your pond both in the summer and winter.

Pond Talk: Does your pond freeze over during the winter, even with aeration?

Keep your pond healthy all winter long!

When do the bacteria say it’s too cold to eat? – Ponds & Lakes Q & A

When do the bacteria say it's too cold to eat?

When do the bacteria say it’s too cold to eat? Farrah – Rockport, KY

You’ve counted on your bacteria to keep your pond clear and muck free throughout the summer but they may soon be taking a breather as winter approaches and water temperatures drop. Although you will see a dip in muck eradicating productivity rest assured that your microbial mates are not saying goodbye for good.

Bacteria products like Pond Logic™ Pond Clear™ and MuckAway™ advertise that you should apply treatments whenever your water temperature is above 50°F. This is more of a target area than a temperature cutoff and lets you know you are approaching conditions that are less than optimal for your bacteria to work. Once your water temperatures frequently stay at or below the 50° mark you will want to stop applying bacteria treatments.

To monitor this target area, you can install a floating pond thermometer in your pond to take regular temperature readings. To get accurate readings push the thermometer beneath the surface of the water and closer to the bottom where the water is less affected by ambient air temperatures. Be sure to remove the thermometer before your pond ices over to avoid damaging the unit.

Your bacteria may not be too enthusiastic about the cold weather, but your other pond care products like pond dye are ready to go no matter what the forecast says. As some plants can still grow in colder temperatures while your bacteria and herbicides are out of commission, dye can be one of the cheaper and easier applications to help maintain your pond even as it ices over.

POND TALK: What time of the year do you stop using your bacteria?

Eliminate up to 5 inches of muck a year!

How do I know if I have proper aeration? – Pond & Lake Q & A

Don’t Under Aerate
How do I know if I have proper aeration? Felipe – Moscow, ID

The bigger the better when it comes to aeration.

When purchasing your aeration system you were told it will promote a clean, healthy pond with less algae and clear water. With more and more customers installing aeration systems in their ponds now may be a good time to discuss some of the assumptions and mistakes made when choosing an aeration system.

An aeration system can make the difference when it comes to your pond’s health, so selecting the right system can be very important.  In the long-run there is no free lunch.  If you try to “Make Do” with a smaller aeration system than what is recommend, it may come back to haunt you.  When an aeration system is sized correctly it will eliminate any thermoclines (thermoclines are a separation of water based on temperature). Have you ever swam in your pond and felt very cold water at your feet? Most pond owners believe this is a spring, when in reality, it’s caused by a thermocline. Proper aeration improves water quality, breaks down organic debris (muck) and improves the overall ecosystem in your pond.  Aeration works by circulating the entire pond’s water column from top to bottom.  The tiny bubbles created by the diffuser forces cool oxygen deprived water from the bottom depths all the way to the pond’s surface. This circulation drives oxygen to the bottom of the pond allowing “good” bacteria to digest muck, reducing nutrients and increase the overall dissolved oxygen in the pond.  If the system is undersized it will not create uniform circulation and simply pump small amounts of the cool nutrient-rich water from the bottom of your pond to the top.  This is the equivalent of adding fertilizer to your pond.  This can result in additional algae growth, odors and even fish kills.  This can all be especially true during the warmer months of the year.

If you currently have an aeration system running and you are not sure if it is sized correctly, there is an easy way to tell with a thermometer and long string.  You will use the string to extend the reach of the thermometer taking temperature readings every 24 inches, letting the thermometer rest long enough to get the true temperature reading at your desired depth.  Take readings every 24 inches until you reach the bottom of your pond. If there is more then a few degrees difference in any of your temperature readings you are more then likely under aerating your pond.

If you haven’t purchased an aeration system yet take advantage of The Pond Guys and Gals, we offer free aeration mapping and technical support.

Don’t Under Aerate

Why is it important to aerate my lake during the summer? – Pond & Lake Q & A

Airmax® Aeration

Pond & Lake Q & A

Q: Why is it important to aerate my lake during the summer? – Eric in Texas

A: Though the hottest days of summer are nearly behind us, your pond or lake still needs proper aeration – especially as we approach fall, when temperatures shift and your pond water will turn over. An aerated pond is a healthy pond, and a healthy pond is one you’ll enjoy all year long.

Why Aerate?

Ponds and lakes go through two stages of life: Stage 1, when the pond has just been excavated and Stage 2, when the pond has had a chance to become established. During Stage 1, which may only last a year, the pond is virtually nutrient-free. It has little or no leaf and plant debris, the fish have produced little waste and the environment has leached almost nothing into the water. It’s like the honeymoon stage of your pond – all the beauty with little maintenance.

After a season or two, the pond enters into Stage 2. Nutrients, like leaves, plants, fish waste and plant fertilizers, build up in the pond. You’ll start to see large amounts of algae and weed growth. Under the surface, the water column becomes murky with debris; at the bottom of the pond, muck will start to develop. This decomposing organic waste adds even more nutrients to the water – which can cause even more algae and weed growth. Talk about a vicious cycle!

At the same time, all those decomposing nutrients create a rise in toxic gas levels. Ammonia and nitrites build up in the water while the oxygen level plummets, especially in the deeper depths of the pond. Because ponds without aeration can become thermally stratified, the toxic gases created on the bottom build up in the cool water underneath. A change in temperature, a heavy rain or sometimes even high winds can turn the water over allowing the toxic, oxygen-deprived water at the bottom to mix into the top layer leaving your fish without oxygen and causing a fish kill.

The Solution

Many pond owners will turn to fountain aeration or surface aerators to churn the water. While fountains are aesthetically pleasing, they will only draw surface water, leaving the bottom of the pond uncirculated and doing nothing to eliminate toxic gases underneath.

A bottom bubbler, however, will circulate the entire water column from the bottom up and eliminate the thermal layers that form in the pond or lake. In a permanent state of motion, the action caused by the bubbler will continuously vent gasses and provide oxygen to the bottom sediments, allowing the beneficial bacteria to break down the toxic gasses and muck and give off a little oxygen in return.

The best option for a bottom bubbler is the Airmax® Aeration system. In combination with aerobic muck-eating bacteria, like MuckAway™ Pellets or PondClear™ Packets, the system can eliminate up to 5 inches of muck per year – and keep your pond or lake healthy no matter the season.

POND TALK: Why do you aerate your pond or lake?

Prevent Fall Turnover & Fish Kills by Using Aeration – Pond & Lake Q & A

Picture of a Fish Kill due to Fall Turnover

Being Aware of Fall Turnover.

Instead of a Q & A for Ponds & Lakes today, I wanted to make everyone aware of what Fall Turnover is and the steps you can take to protect your fish. Around this time of the year we receive quite a few phone calls from customers waking up to find a pond full of dead fish. Hopefully, I can shed some light on this subject that can help you prevent an event like this from happening.

What is Turnover? With no aeration present, the pond’s water is stratified (aka has a thermocline). Meaning that the water at the top is warmer and full of oxygen while on the bottom the water is cooler, nutrient rich and contains no oxygen. This causes the fish to habitate towards the surface of the pond. As the seasons change from the hot summer to the cold winter, the pond goes through a process known as “turnover”. This is when the cooler,
un-oxygenated water at the bottom of the pond, mixes with the warmer oxygenated water at the pond’s surface. Since the rising cooler water contains no oxygen, the fish lose the ability to breathe in a sufficient supply of oxygen. Shortly after, the fish begin to die.

Aeration to the Rescue! You’ve probably heard me talk about aeration in many Q & A’s over the past couple months and are probably sick of hearing about it. But it really is that important and really is a solution to a majority of a pond’s problems.

By properly aerating your pond, the oxygen will be saturated throughout the pond, thus eliminating the thermocline and eliminating the chance for future fish kills caused by “turnover”.

You can also under-aerate a pond as well. Please read the following Q & A for more information.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 143 other followers