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Do I really need to feed my fish? – Pond & Lake Q & A

Do I really need to feed my fish?

Do I really need to feed my fish? Joe – Little Rock, AR

Come And Get It
Those of us pond guys and gals that own large farm ponds have been feeding our fish for ages. Over the years, some of us have pondered, “Do I really have to feed my fish?”

“Fish” Food Versus Fish Food
There are two ways to keep your fish well fed: properly stock your pond or use fish food. We suggest both.

Properly Stocking:
To properly balance your pond, you should stock the water body with 3 prey fish, like Perch or Bluegill, for every 1 predator fish, such as Bass. This will ensure that your predator fish will have a bountiful selection of prey, while still giving the prey fish a sporting chance to mature and reproduce. If you stock too many prey fish, you will experience a very small number of big predators and a ton of tiny pan prey fish. If you stock too many predators, you will end up with very small predators and only a few big prey. When your pond is properly stocked, your fish population tends to keep itself in check. We suggest starting out with 300 bluegills and 100 bass per acre. You can add some feeder minnows into the pond to provide a nice snack that will be able to replenish itself. However, it is not uncommon for the fish in your pond to make short work of the feeder minnows you add to the pond.

Fish Food Pellets:
So you feel your fish should have a little more selection than their regular diet of … well … each other? You can control what your fish are eating by feeding them quality fish food like Game Fish Grower. Foods that are high in protein and low in filler promote rapid fish growth and optimum overall size. Pellet feeding also provides an opportunity to turn feeding your fish into an opportunity to have some fun. Pellet training your fish takes some patience and persistence, and while it can be trying at times, it is truly enjoyable once you get it right. Try to establish a daily routine feeding time and place so your fish will begin to expect your pond side presence. Start by throwing some pellets in the water from a distance, waiting for the fish to venture to the water surface to take the food. Repeat this process until your fish willingly greet you at feeding time. As time progresses, you can close the distance between you and the pond’s edge. Avoid making sudden movements, as this will scare the fish and they will be more hesitant to approach you at feeding time. You can then begin placing your hand into the pond with a fist full of food, opening your hand slowly to release the pellets which will float to the surface. You may not have any takers the first few days you try this, but if you are patient, they will eventually figure out where this food is coming from. As they grow more comfortable to your hand being in the pond, they will start eating from it. If you do not have the time or desire to feed your fish by hand, you can place a feeder, like the a directional feeder, at the pond’s edge to release food at programmed intervals.

What’s On The Menu?
While your fish always eat the food you throw in the pond like they haven’t eaten in years, the truth is, if your pond is stocked properly, they really don’t need any outside assistance. On top of having other fish in the pond to eat, they will also eat bugs from the surface of the pond, leaches at the bottom, and basically anything else they can find in the water. Try to catch some of the fish in your pond each season and record how many of each type you are pulling out of the pond while inspecting them for healthy color, weight, and size. Occasionally checking up on your fish will decrease the frequency and severity of population issues, while making your pond an enjoyable addition to your home with fun activities for the entire family.

POND TALK: How often do you feed your fish?

The Pond Guy® Game Fish Grower - Fish Food

I have algae growing all over the place. I keep using chemicals but they don’t seem to last long. What else can I do? – Ponds & Lakes Q & A

The best way to beat algae is with the Airmax® Ecosystem PROactive approach.
Pre-order For Fish Day Online…more info

I have algae growing all over the place. I keep using chemicals but it doesn’t seem to last long. What else can I do? Howard – Dallas/Ft Worth, TX

Beat Your Greens
As we approach our warmer spring and summer months, you may find yourself watching in awe as algae takes over your pond at an almost impossible rate. What is going on in your pond that is making it punish you so? Let’s take a look at the cause of algae and your approach on treating it.

Ready, Get Set, React
Unless you find your new algae bloom a welcome addition to your pond, you will want to get rid of it as soon as possible. Algaecides like Algae Defense® and Cutrine®-Plus Granular are great products to eliminate existing algae blooms. If you have trout, Koi or goldfish in your pond, you will want to use a non-copper based product like Clipper™ to do the job. While these products address the current outbreak in your pond, they will not treat the source of the issue or prevent future occurrences and they require repetitive treatments. Even after the algae bloom is killed, you will still have to do some legwork in terms of removing dead plant matter. Leaving dead algae in your pond will only hinder your quest for a clear pond by providing even more algae food in the form of decaying plant matter. For these reasons, using chemical applications to fight algae is referred to as a reactive approach.

Going Proactive
As the saying goes, “The way to algae’s heart is through its stomach”. While we might not be current with our sayings, this one still holds some truth. Eliminate the food sources available to algae and you will send it packing. Performing regular maintenance in your pond to prevent algae growth is a proactive treatment. Algae can utilize both available sunlight and nutrients held in your pond to stage its backyard assault. By adopting a proactive routine, you can keep your pond clean and clear all season long and save some money on repetitive chemical treatments.

The best step you can take in establishing a Proactive treatment plan is to implement aeration in your pond. Sub-surface aeration systems like our Airmax® Aeration Series will circulate your pond’s water column and infuse it with dissolved oxygen, which on its own will promote the colonization of beneficial bacteria. These beneficial bacteria will break down that same nutrient load your algae utilizes, thereby discouraging continued growth. The bacteria in products like Pond Logic® PondClear™ and MuckAway™ will reinforce the natural bacteria in your pond, ensuring that your pond is able to break down nutrients faster than they are being introduced into the pond. Without an available nutrient load, algae will have to utilize sunlight to generate food. By adding pond dye, you can not only beautify your pond, but also limit the amount of light able to penetrate the water surface. Pond dyes like Pond Logic® Nature’s Blue™, Twilight Blue™, or Black DyeMond™ give you the option to choose the color that best suits your pond while still obtaining a natural look. If you would like more information on choosing the right shade for your pond, click HERE.

We have packaged a collection of products to take the guesswork out of completing your pond maintenance and appropriately named it the Pond Logic® ClearPAC® . The ClearPAC® contains PondClear™ Beneficial Bacterial, Nature’s Blue™, EcoBoost™ Bacteria Enhancer and Algae Defense® . These products are designed to kill algae, clear water, reduce muck, and shade your pond combining the immediate results of reactive treatments with the economical preventative results of a balanced proactive approach.

Pond Talk: Have you used MuckAway™ in you pond or lake? Were you happy with your results?

Pond Logic® ClearPAC® - DIY Complete Pond Care Program

Michigan Residents Can Pre-order Fish to pick up In-store on Fish Day – May 8th

The Pond Guy presents Fish Day 2010 on May 8th

What is Fish Day?

Fish Day is a local semi-annual event located in Marine City, MI. Although Koi and Goldfish are offered all season at our location, game fish are reduced to only twice a year (Spring & Fall). Game fish require a much larger environment to survive they cannot be held in holding tanks for any extended period of time. Fish Day is a great opportunity to visit with other pond owners, get lots of free pond advice and save on some of our most popular items such as Airmax Aeration Systems, weed and algae treatments, Nature’s Blue Pond Dye and many other great items. Advanced orders are recommended and will be filled first. Extras will be available starting at 9 am on Fish Day, although they are subject to availability. No deposit is required. $25 minimum order.

This is not exclusive to Michigan residents. Fish bags have a limited oxygen supply (approximately 1-2 hours) for the fish. We’re locate at:

6135 King Road
Marine City, Michigan 48039
(888) 766-3520

You can order:
1/4 Acre Package $299.00 SAVE 5% (75 Hybrid Bluegills, 50 Redear Sunfish, 25 Perch, 50 Bass and 6 lbs. Minnows)
1/2 Acre Package $469.99 SAVE 10% (175 Hybrid Bluegills, 50 Redear Sunfish, 50 Perch, 75 Bass, 12 lbs. Minnows)
Customize or your Fish Day Package which is a $25 Minimum. We ask that the fish be ordered in increments of 5

Here are the fish available:
2″–4″ Hybrid Bluegills ($0.89 ea. or $79/100)
2″–4″ Redear Sunfish ($1.29 ea. or $119/100)
2″–4″ Yellow Perch ($1.49 ea. or $139/100)
3″–4″ Large Mouth Bass ($1.89 ea. or $179/100)
3″–5″ Channel Catfish ($0.99 ea. or $89/100)
Fathead Minnows up to 5 lbs ($10 per pound)
Fathead Minnows up to 6 lbs or more ($9 per pound)

Note: Price includes fish, bags and oxygen. Minimum fish order $25. Bring cooler or Rubbermaid tub. These containers will protect your bags during transportation. Each bag will be supplied with up to 3 hours of oxygen. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Largemouth Bass

Quick Links:

  • Fish Available
  • How to Order
  • Stocking Rates
  • Fish Habitat
  • Do I need to feed my fish?
  • Fish Day FAQ
  • Directions to get to Fish Day
  • Pond Talk: Have you participated in The Pond Guys Fish Day event?

    Pond & Lake Fish Day - May 8th

    How Do I Stock Fish In My Pond? – Ponds & Lakes Q & A

    Largemouth Bass

    Q: How Do I Stock Fish In My Pond? – Ellie in Massachusetts

    Where’s The Fish?
    Both fishing enthusiasts and pond hobbyists alike can appreciate the presence of a healthy fish population in their pond. While they are fun to catch and entertaining to watch, they also help maintain a balanced backyard ecosystem. As is true with most aspects of your pond, the key to maintaining an enjoyable environment is balance. When stocking your pond, you will want to add a combination of both predator (largemouth bass for example) and prey fish (bluegill or perch). Your predator fish won’t fare too well without prey fish on their menu. If you stock your pond with prey fish only, there will be few factors regulating their population which can lead to an uncomfortably high fish population. When stocking your pond, aim for a 3:1 prey to predator ratio to ensure your predator fish have a reasonable meal selection. Maintaining a clean pond with plenty of aeration will promote a robust and healthy fish selection. Most man-made ponds lack adequate habitats, so make sure you provide options like a Fish Attractor that provides a retreat for the smaller up-and-coming fish.

    Every Fish Has Its Day
    Our local customers can take advantage of The Pond Guy semi-annual Fish Day, which takes place on the 8th of May. Fish Day is a great opportunity to meet with other pond owners, speak with the friendly and knowledgeable Pond Guy staff, and browse our wide selection of pond products from Pond Dye to aeration. Customers can pre-order online or over the phone until May 7th; orders will be available for payment and pick-up on May 8th between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. There will be a wide selection of both predator and prey fish available for purchase, including Hybrid Bluegill, Perch, Catfish and Bass. Walk-ins are welcome, but selection will be limited by availability.

    POND TALK: What types of fish do you keep in your pond?

    The Pond Guy presents Fish Day 2010 on May 8th

    Why do I need to test for carbonate hardness in my lake or pond? – Pond & Lake Q & A

    Testing for Carbonate Hardness

    Pond & Lake Q & A

    Q: Why do I need to test for carbonate hardness in my lake or pond? – Jose in Michigan

    A: A number of pond treatments, including some algae-control formulas and other herbicides, contain copper. In certain conditions, the copper chelate may break down and release copper ions, which could cause your pond or lake’s alkalinity to rise.

    If you use these treatments in a pond or lake stocked with trout, koi or goldfish that are sensitive to high alkalinity levels, you need to test your hardness regularly to ensure the health of your fish population.

    What is Carbonate Hardness?

    Carbonate hardness, or alkalinity, is the measure of carbonate and bicarbonate concentrations in your pond or lake’s water. Alkalinity is a measure of the ability of a solution to neutralize acid without changing the pH. It both controls and maintains water pH.

    Alkalinity is related to the amount of dissolved calcium, magnesium and other compounds in the water, so alkalinity tends to be higher in harder water. It naturally decreases over time through bacterial action that produces acidic compounds that combine with and reduce the alkalinity components.

    In a pond or lake, the alkalinity of the water is critical to the health of the fish – especially for trout, koi and goldfish. For these fish, the carbonate hardness of your pond or lake must exceed 50 ppm for the fish to survive, ideally falling between 50 ppm and 200 ppm.

    Testing 1, 2, 3

    When you’re treating your pond with a product like Pond Logic® Algae Defense®, be sure to use a water hardness test kit, like Laguna Quick Dip Multi-Test Strips.

    Carbonate hardness is measured in degrees (KH) or in parts per million (ppm). Because the water hardness test kit will give its results in degrees, you’ll need to convert your findings from KH to ppm to determine whether the levels in your lake are safe for your fish. Use this formula to figure it out: 1 KH = 17.848 ppm. So if your test kit reads 5 KH, you would multiply 5 times 17.848, which equals 89.24 ppm.

    POND TALK: How often do you test your pond or lake’s carbonate hardness level?

    Controlling Algae in a Pond Containing Trout – Pond & Lake Q & A

    Q: How do you control algae growth in a small pond that will not affect the fish (trout) in it?
    -Jerry of Harrisburg, PA

    A: We always suggest to customers with a pond of any size to use an aeration system along with natural bacteria to help eliminate muck and prevent stagnant water. Using these products together will make pond management easier and in time will reduce the need for chemicals. As far as the algae you currently have, there are a couple options to get rid of it. They are Algae Defense® Algaecide and Clipper™. If you use the Algae Defense®, you will need to test your water hardness to ensure the carbonate hardess is above 50 ppm (parts per million) which is safe level for trout when treating with Algae Defense®. If you do not wish to go that route or if your pond contains koi or goldfish, use Clipper™ instead. Clipper™ is a granular that will work both on algae and weeds.

    Just remember, using only chemicals to control algae is a “reactive”, short-term approach. If you really want to gain control over the long-haul, then you need to be “proactive” and follow the 4-Easy Steps to the Perfect Ecosystem. Watch our 4-step video online to learn more.

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