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How do I know which chemicals will treat my weeds? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: How do I know which chemicals will treat my weeds?

Q: How do I know which chemicals will treat my weeds?

Henry – Markesan, WI

A: Weeds. Whether they’re algae or submerged, floating or shoreline plants, they’re a nuisance—not to mention a potential hazard to your game fish and pond or lake health. In order to manage these green invaders, you should get to know them a little better. Don’t worry: you don’t need to be a Master Gardener to identify and treat them. Here’s all you need to know:

1. Know the Weeds

Before you start dumping chemicals on the weeds in your pond, you’ll first need to understand the different types of aquatic weeds that pop up in lakes or ponds. There are four basic categories:

  • Algae. Algae comes in three basic types: Planktonic, which causes the pea soup look in your water; filamentous, which creates blankets of stringy stuff or pond scum; and chara or muskgrass, which smells like musky garlic. When you take a closer look, these weeds have no defined root systems, unlike their other weed cousins.
  • Submerged. Submerged weeds live underwater. This group of troublemakers includes bladderwort, several types of pondweed, watermilfoil, parrot feather and hydrilla. They look like a typical plant, with leaves, stems and root systems.
  • Floating. Floating weeds generally reside in shallow water and have root systems that reach into the water or down into the soil, allowing their leaves and flowers to rise to the surface. They include watermeal, duckweed, azolla and even water lilies. When not kept in check, these floaters can take over a pond in no time.
  • Emergent. Emergent weeds live along your lake’s shoreline. These plants like to keep their feet wet; their foliage, leaves and flowers live out of water, but their root systems prefer wet, almost completely saturated soil. Emergent weeds include cattails, phragmites, purple loosestrife and bulrush.

2. ID the Weed

Once you identify the category of weed you’re dealing with, head over to our Weed Control Guide and try to match weed with the picture. For example, is it a floating plant with a root system? Then you’re dealing with a type of floating weed. Is it completely submerged? Then you’re dealing with a type of submerged weed.

Each weed included in our Weed Control Guide will describe the best treatment options to manage it. Not sure of the weed? Snap a close-up photo and e-mail it to us at weedid@thepondguy.com. Of course, you can always call us toll-free for advice, too, at 866-POND-HELP (766-3435)!

3. Treat the Weed

Once you’ve ID’d the weed, treat it with its appropriate herbicide, remembering to always follow label instructions when applying it to your pond or lake. If you have fish in your pond, we suggest treating in sections as sudden changes in water conditions can affect aquatic species. Treat 1/4 – 1/2 of pond at a time, while waiting 10-14 days between treatments.

4. Remove the Remains

Once the chemicals start working to kill the weeds, make sure you remove the decomposing foliage with a weed rake, like the Jenlis Weed Razer™ Aquatic Weed Cutter. Why? Because anything dead will turn into muck and start the weed/algae cycle again—which is not something you want to happen, right?

Pond Talk: What tips do you have for managing aquatic weeds?

Broad Spectrum Pondweed Control - Pond Logic® Ultra PondWeed Defense®

Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Jeremy – Clinton, IA

A: It sure doesn’t take much for algae to grow out of control! Combine warm sunshine with some algae-loving nutrients and, before long, you’ll have a pond full of pea soup. When it’s thick and dense, those tiny plants can then suck all the oxygen from the water, leaving your fish gasping for air. Plus, it looks bad and can cause some major stink.

For the health of your fish and your lake, you must regain control. Here’s a two-pronged approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over.

TREAT THE GROWTH

First, you need to get rid of the algae blooms. For floating algae and chara that’s less than 3 feet deep, use Algae Defense®. The aquatic algaecide comes in a fast-acting liquid formula that can be directly applied to your lake with a pressurized sprayer. If you’re dealing with chara that’s deeper than 3 feet, use Cutrine®-Plus. Its granular formula sinks to the bottom of your lake and destroys the algae.

Once the algaecides start working to kill the blooms, don’t forget to remove dead algae from the pond with a tool like the Pond Rake. If you leave the dead foliage in the lake, will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

TREAT THE SOURCE

Now that you’ve got the algae under control, it’s time to get proactive and prevent its future growth. Begin by adding PondClear™ & MuckAway™. These products contain beneficial bacteria that gobble through excess nutrients like suspended organic waste and muck in your pond. The result: Clean and clear water with no noxious odors.

Next, shade the water with pond dye. By preventing the sun’s rays from penetrating the water, you’ll starve the algae of sunlight, which it needs to thrive.

ONE-STOP SHOPPING

Looking for an easy solution? Check out the ClearPAC® PLUS. This all-in-one algae destroyer contains everything you’ll need to kill the algae and prevent future growth. It contains algaecide, beneficial bacteria and pond dye to fight algae and suspended debris all season long.

Pond Talk: How do you prevent excess nutrients from entering your pond or lake?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS Combo

Is it too cold to treat my pond with the ClearPAC® PLUS? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

: Is it too cold to treat my pond with the ClearPAC® PLUS?

Q: Is it too cold to treat my pond with the ClearPAC® PLUS?

Steve – Denham Springs, LA

A: The Pond Logic® ClearPAC® and ClearPAC® PLUS combine PondClear™, Algae Defense®, EcoBoost™ and Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye to combat algae and suspended debris and beautify your lake or pond. Some components of this super-pack have temperature limitations while others can be used year-round. Let’s take a closer look at each one.

PondClear™ (and MuckAway™)

Beneficial bacteria that break down muck and suspended debris, such as those found in PondClear™ (and MuckAway™ in ClearPAC® PLUS), can be used when water temperatures rise to more than 50° Fahrenheit or so. Though that temperature is not a definitive starting point, the bacteria will become more effective as the temperatures rise. Bottom line: When your underwater thermometer tops 50°, it’s time to start treating your pond or lake with ClearPAC®.

Algae Defense®

This algae-destroyer can be used to treat troublesome floating filamentous algae, bottom growing chara or the planktonic algae as long as it’s green and growing, and the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60° Fahrenheit.

EcoBoost™

EcoBoost™, which is a bacteria booster rather than an actual bacteria, has no temperature restrictions so it can be used year-round to bind phosphates that find their way into your pond or lake. You can use EcoBoost™ throughout the spring to give you a head start on pond season.

Pond Dye

The final ingredient in the Pond Logic® ClearPAC®, Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye, is not temperature-sensitive, so it can be used year-round to give your pond or lake that aesthetic appeal throughout the winter months. And if spring storms are preventing you from standing next to your pond pouring in a quart of dye, try Pond Dye Packets—all you do is toss the water-soluble packet into the water and head back to your warm and toasty home!

Pond Talk: What changes do you have planned for your fish pond or lake this year?

Eliminate The Guesswork - Pond Logic® ClearPAC® PLUS

Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond?

Q: Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond?

Bill – Ashville, OH

A: Barley straw and ponds have some great chemistry. As a barley straw bale breaks down in water, it produces and releases many chemical compounds—and one of them may actually control algae growth.

How? Scientists from the Ohio State University Extension report that the compound interferes with and prevents the new growth of algae cells. As the old algae cells naturally die off, few new algae cells are produced—thereby controlling the overall algae population.

Sounds like a perfect solution for your 1/2 acre lake, right?

Well, barley straw will technically work to control algae in all that water—but you’ll need a ton of barley to accomplish it! More precisely, you’ll need as much as 112 pounds per 1/2 acre of surface area, according to OSU experts.

That’s great if you live next to a barley field, but that’s not a reality for most of us …

And accessibility to all those pounds of straw isn’t the only challenge. The bales are also tough to handle. In a small 1,000-gallon pond, small bales of barley straw can be used and tucked away in the filter, out of view. But in a sizable pond or lake, large bales are cumbersome to haul and position.

Not only that, but they also need to be broken apart to allow the right amount of oxygen in the middle of the bale so it properly decomposes, which means all that loose material will float to the pond’s surface and really make a mess of things.

Rather than wrangle all that barley straw, try an Airmax® Aeration System instead coupled with a beneficial bacteria product, like MuckAway™. The aeration system will circulate the pond water, allowing the bacteria to break down all the muck.

Low amounts of nutrients in the pond means less food for plants and weeds—and that’s some chemistry every lake owner should understand.

Pond Talk: Do you prefer aeration and beneficial bacteria over barley straw? If so, why?

Reduce Mucky Pond Bottoms - Pond Logic® MuckAway™

How Do I Treat Duckweed? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

How Do I Treat Duckweed?

How Do I Treat Duckweed?

Tim – Rock Hall, MD

Duckweed is a very small floating plant about the size of a pencil eraser. It has shoe-sole shaped leaves with a small, hair-like root hanging below. Since duckweed floats on the surface of the pond, it is commonly mistaken for and treated as if it is algae. Unfortunately, algaecides have no effect on duckweed but there are a couple treatments you can do to keep the prolific duckweed at bay.

The Short-Term Solution
To treat duckweed as well as other aquatic weeds on a short-term basis, you can use Ultra PondWeed Defense® . This product is great for a one-time treatment or for spot treating. These are, however, only short-term solutions for duckweed. Due to their aggressive nature, duckweed can grow back in as little as 3 to 4 weeks. This is why we suggest a longer-term solution.

The Long-Term Solution
One of the only products on the market to provide long-term, season-long control of duckweed and other aquatic weeds is called Sonar™ A.S. Instead of having to spray the plant directly, Sonar™ A.S. is sprayed directly into the water. Sonar™ A.S. works by preventing photosynthesis in aquatic plants and by doing so causes them to slowly parish. Treating duckweed and other aquatic plants in this fashion allows for complete control of the entire water body for the season instead of just a few weeks.

Q&A: Are there any tips to making sure the ice on my pond is safe to stand on?

Are there any tips to making sure the ice on my pond is safe to stand on?

Are there any tips to making sure the ice on my pond is safe to stand on?
Nicki – Sandusky, OH

Winter brings not only cold weather and snow to your pond or lake but a perfect layer of ice for skating, ice fishing, snowmobiling and other fun as well. While you may be eager to get out on the ice this season, it is important that you know how to distinguish the difference between safe strong ice and a potential hazard.

There are a lot of different factors that determine the ice thickness on a water body. Temperature has a large part in ice formation of course but water currents, wind and snow coverage also play a role in how water freezes. You should see a satisfactory layer of ice form on your pond after two to three weeks of freezing temperatures. Once temperatures stabilize and the ice has time to thicken you can venture onto the surface and perform an inspection.

You can visually determine the quality of ice by looking for bubbles, trapped snow, cracks and color. A clear solid blue layer of ice is stronger than a white brittle formation caused by air pockets and other flaws. Keep in mind that a pond with a running aeration system will have air pockets and should not be used for recreation in the winter. Naturally new ice is stronger than old ice as there are less chances of warm weather thawing and re-freezing. Once you have inspected the surface of the ice you can drill or cut samples to verify thickness. Since a water body will not always freeze evenly you will want to take samples in multiple locations as you work your way out towards the center. A layer of ice less than 3 inches is unsatisfactory for most people to walk out onto. It may be able to hold up lighter people or small animals but can easily crack. If you plan on having a group of people on the pond or want to take your snowmobile out on your lake an ice formation of 6-8 inches minimum is ideal. Click over to our blog on Ice Formation for more information regarding ice thickness and formation.

Be patient this winter and exercise extreme caution when venturing onto the ice. Taking the extra time out to visually inspect your ice and take samples can mean all the difference between a fun day outdoors or potential injury. Always make sure there is a floatation device within reach in case of a fall-through and always use common sense when venturing out on the ice.

Pond Talk: How do you determine when it is safe to venture out onto your pond or lake in the winter?

keep your pond safe at all times with a life ring!

Is it too cold to use bacteria? If so, is there anything else I should continue to use now? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Is it too cold to use bacteria? If so, is there anything else I should continue to use now?

Is it too cold to use bacteria? If so, is there anything else I should continue to use now?
Susan – Cincinnati, OH

Like lots of living creatures, beneficial bacteria appreciate a cozy, comfortable environment. And from their bacterial perspectives, water temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit are no longer cozy at all. That’s why we recommend against the use of bacteria when the water falls below that threshold.

Regardless of the temperature, many pond owners enhance the beauty of their water feature with the use of our Pond Logic® Pond Dyes. These dyes are available in Nature’s Blue™, Twilight Blue™ or Black DyeMond™ colors, and are completely safe for people, pets, and aquatic life. And whether you choose to add them during winter months – or all year ‘round – they add a touch of elegance to any backyard pond.

In addition to our Pond Dyes, it’s wise to consider the use of our Pond Logic® EcoBoost™ Bacteria Enhancer. With its unique, safe formulation, EcoBoost™ binds with phosphates and other harmful toxins that can be harmful to fish and plants, and introduces more than 80 helpful trace minerals to keep water clear and healthy. While EcoBoost™ doesn’t contain bacteria, its formulation helps to make pond water safe for beneficial bacteria to thrive. We recommend its continued use until your pond freezes over – which will help to ensure a good head start when the ice goes out, and preparations begin for a new season.

Pond Talk: What maintenance do you continue to do throughout the winter months?

Pond Logic EcoBoost

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