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My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it?

Q: My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it?

C.J.- Dumas, AR

A: With summer temperatures settling in, algae blooms are coming out swinging. Bright sunshine and warm temperatures trigger green growth, so it’s critical to keep floating and submerged algae in check before it grows out of control.

For the health of your pond and its inhabitants, keeping algae blooms to a minimum is necessary. Here’s an approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over:

Treat the Growth
First, use an algaecide to great rid of the algae bloom. You can treat floating algae with a fast-acting liquid spray like Algae Defense® Algaecide with Treatment Booster™ PLUS, which treats floating algae and chara that’s less than 3’ deep. Simply spray it on with a pressurized sprayer to combat floating and bottom-growing algae.

Submerged algae can be treated with sinking granular products, such as Cutrine®-Plus. It works well for algae submerged deep in your pond or lake, such as Chara. It’s best distributed on a calm day via a granular spreader in the morning before mats form.

Remove the Dead Algae
Once the algae is dead, you should remove it. Why? By leaving the dead foliage in the lake, it will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

Use a pond skimmer, like the PondSkim™, or a rake, like the Pond & Beach Rake, to prevent that muck from accumulating.

Add Beneficial Bacteria
Three days after you’ve used algaecides, treat your pond with PondClear™. It contains beneficial bacteria that gobbles through the organic material that’s suspended in the water column. The result is a lake filled with clean, clear, odor-free water—and a healthy ecosystem for your game fish and other pond inhabitants.

Shade Water with Pond Dye
Finally, be sure to add blue or black pond dye to your pond throughout the spring and summer. By reducing the amount of sunlight that shines through the water and stimulates plant growth, you will ultimately reduce the amount of algae.

Pond Talk: How do you keep your algae blooms in check?

Fast Acting Liquid Formula, Eliminate Algae - Pond Logic(r) Algae Defense(r) Algaecide

Can I still swim in my pond if I use Pond Dye?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Can I still swim in my pond if I use Pond Dye?

Q: Can I still swim in my pond if I use Pond Dye?

Russell – Boise, ID

A: If you’ve been reading this blog regularly, you probably already know the benefits of using pond dye in your farm pond or lake. Our Nature’s Blue™, Twilight Blue™ and Black Dyemond™ Pond Dye reduces algae blooms by shading the water, preventing the sun’s rays from reaching below the surface. The dye beautifies your property by tinting the water an attractive blue or black shade that reflects the surrounding landscape.

Don’t worry: If you swim in your pond, the dye won’t tint your skin blue or black.

Both Liquid Pond Dye and the Pond Dye Packets are completely safe for use around livestock, domestic animals, wildlife and humans. Water treated with the dye may be used for recreational swimming, irrigation and aquaculture as soon as it disperses throughout the pond or lake, though you should keep animals and kids away from it when it’s first applied.

We do recommend that you wear some Aqua Gloves™ and old clothes when applying the liquid dye as it will stain your clothes and skin in its concentrated form. Other than that, it’s easy to use: Just pour in the Liquid Pond Dye from several spots along the pond’s edge, or you toss the Pond Dye Packets into the water from the shoreline.

For year-long beauty, apply in the early spring and continue to apply monthly or as needed to maintain a true color all season long. Water temperature has no effect on the pond dye, though heavy rain or intense sunlight may require additional treatments.

So dye away – and enjoy a nice dip in the pond afterwards!

Pond Talk: Do you prefer our liquid pond dye or our pond dye packets? What makes one better than another?

Shade & Protect Your Pond All Year - Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye Quarts

I had a bad duckweed problem last year. How do I prevent it this year? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I had a bad duckweed problem last year. How do I prevent it this year?

Q: I had a bad duckweed problem last year. How do I prevent it this year?

Alex – Alvada,OH

A: As you know, Duckweed is a persistent pond pest. Dense colonies of these prolific plants can completely cover the surface of a lake or fish pond, causing dissolved oxygen depletions and fish kills. These tiny invaders need to be managed before they take over.

ID Duckweed

Transported by waterfowl, Duckweed is a very small, light green, free-floating plant that sports a single hair-like root and three 1/16- to 1/8-inch long leaves, or fronds, that resemble a four-leaf clover. It tends to grow in dense colonies in quiet water that’s undisturbed by waves, and it’s often mistaken for algae.

Though Duckweed colonies can provide a habitat for microscopic critters and forage for hungry ducks, the plant can wipe out oxygen in the water if it grows to cover a lake’s or pond’s surface. That could compromise your fishes’ health and cut off sunlight to underwater plants.

Plant Pest Control

Because Duckweed is such a small plant that spreads very quickly, it can be difficult to control – and so it’s critical to treat your pond or lake early in the spring when the growth first appears.

To manage these aquatic bad guys, you’ll need an herbicide. We recommend Sonar A.S., a weed killer that provides season-long control against unwanted plants like Duckweed. It’s designed for water bodies that have no water outflow, as it can take 30 to 60 days to control established weed growth and up to 90 days for full protection of your pond.

Sonar A.S. degrades quickly in sunlight, and so you must add Pond Dye at the time of treatment. The dye will shade the water and allow the herbicide to work effectively.

Short-Term Solution

If you want to remove the Duckweed for a short period of time but your pond or lake has an outflow that prevents you from using Sonar A.S., you can remove the tiny plants with the Pond Skim. The floating tool, which is 5 feet wide, collects surface debris when dragged across the water.

Pond Talk: How do you remove duckweed from your farm pond or lake?

One Treatment for the Entire Season - Sonar™ Fluridone Aquatic Herbicide

I have a lot of water lilies in my 1/2 acre pond. How do I control them? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I have a lot of water lilies in my 1/2 acre pond. How do I control them?

Q: I have a lot of water lilies in my 1/2 acre pond. How do I control them?

Dan – Newnan, GA

A: In ornamental ponds, water lilies planted in pots are prized possessions—but in a shallow farm pond or lake, lilies living wild can be an invasive species that takes over the water surface in no time.

Of course, water lilies aren’t all bad. Their leaves and roots provide food for beaver, moose, muskrat, porcupine, and deer. Their seeds are gobbled by waterfowl, and their leaves provide protective coverage for largemouth bass, sunfish, and frogs. Left unmanaged, however, water lilies can restrict lake-front access, eliminate swimming opportunities and quickly take over shallow areas.

But before we get into how to control these beautiful but troublesome aquatic plants, let’s learn a bit about them.

Habitat, Growth

The water lily is a floating-leaved aquatic perennial herb that grows rooted in mucky or silty sediments in water 4 to 5 feet deep. It prefers quiet waters like ponds, lake margins and slow streams. When unmanaged, the plant tends to form dense areas covering hundreds of acres.

Each spring, new shoots appear from the rhizomes and grow up through the water until they reach the surface. The flowers appear from June to September. Each blossom opens in the morning and closes in the early afternoon for two to five consecutive days. After the flowers have closed for the final time, the flower stalk corkscrews and draws the developing fruit below the water.

The plant over winters underground as the rhizome. These rhizomes, along with the plant’s seeds, are how it reproduces. A planted rhizome can grow to cover a 15-foot-diameter circle in just five years!

Limiting Those Lilies

You can control water lilies with several different methods.

  • Mechanical Control: First, you can cut/harvest the water lilies or dig up the rhizomes to create open areas of water. If you cut the lilies, you must do so several times a year as these plants thrive in shallow water and grow rapidly. If you dig up the rhizomes, it can be an intrusive and costly though permanent process; they can be difficult to dislodge, but it can be done via rotovation (underwater rototilling) or excavation. Either way, mechanical control is a difficult method because the plant will likely regrow from seeds or remaining rhizomes.
  • Chemical Control: Another more effective method is to use reactive chemical treatment, like Shoreline Defense®, to manage lilies that are actively growing and have reached the surface. When applied directly to the foliage—along with some Treatment Booster™ PLUS to break down the plant’s protective surface—the herbicide’s active ingredient penetrates the lily and makes its way to the rhizome. Once it has turned brown, use a Weed Cutter to remove as much of the decomposing plant as possible to prevent an accumulation of dead material and muck. If you use this method, treat your pond in sections, dosing only half of the lilies at a time; if the weather is hot, decrease that to a third or quarter, waiting 10 to 14 days between treatments.
  • Preventive Control: In addition to mechanical and chemical control, you can also prevent—or at least slow down—the growth of water lilies by treating the pond’s water with Pond Dye. By blocking the sun’s rays early in the season, the lilies will not get the light they need to develop.

Controlling water lilies can be a challenge. But these methods, you can manage them and keep them contained in a particular area, making them a beautiful addition to your landscape.

Pond Talk: How do you control wild water lilies in your farm pond or lake?

Kill Water Lilies and Other Emergent Weeds - Pond Logic(r) Shoreline Defense(r)

The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Sharon – Waynesboro, GA

A: Inside your ClearPAC® PLUS box, you’ll find everything you need to keep your lake clean and clear this spring and summer. The five components, when used as directed, address the root of the most common pond problems by tackling excess nutrients and shielding the water from algae-feeding sunlight.
When should you start using ClearPAC® PLUS? It all depends on your water temperature. Let’s take a closer look at when and how to best use the products in your super-pack.

  • Pond Dye: As soon as the ice melts on your pond or lake, add your Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye. The dye is not temperature-sensitive so it can be used even when water temps are too cold for beneficial bacteria products. Pond Dye does more than color your water and add to your landscape’s aesthetic; it also shades it from sunlight, which can kick-start algae blooms as the mercury rises.
  • PondClear™ and MuckAway™: When water temperatures rise to a consistent 50°F, you can start using the beneficial bacteria found in PondClear™ and MuckAway™ to break down nutrients suspended in your water column and muck on the bottom of your pond. These products can be used at the same time as your Pond Dye and EcoBoost™.
  • EcoBoost™: This bacteria booster that has no temperature restrictions, so it can be used year-round to bind phosphates that find their way into your pond or lake. You can use EcoBoost™ throughout the spring to give you a head start on pond season.
  • Algae Defense® : To be used only as needed, this algae-destroyer treats troublesome floating filamentous algae, bottom growing chara and the planktonic algae when it’s green and growing. Use Algae Defense® when the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60°F. Don’t use Algae Defense® if you keep koi or trout in your lake.

After treating your pond with ClearPAC® PLUS, don’t forget to remove dead algae and debris with your Pond & Beach Rake. Doing so will remove the decaying vegetation and prevent them from feeding the algae—which will ultimately help your Pond Dye, PondClear™, MuckAway™, EcoBoost™ and Algae Defense® work even better!

Pond Talk: Has spring sprung in your area of the country?

Keep Your Pond Clean and Clear - Pond Logic(r) ClearPAC® PLUS

What color pond dye will work best in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: What color pond dye will work best in my pond?

Q: What color pond dye will work best in my pond?

Brian – Kansas City, KS

A: Pond dye is great stuff. It not only enhances your pond or lake’s aesthetic appeal with hues that compliment your landscape, but it also shades the water from the sun’s rays, preventing pesky algae growth and helping you maintain a healthy pond.

Pond dye color is really a matter of personal preference, but different shades are better suited to different situations.

  • Do you have a decorative pond? Try Nature’s Blue™ dye – our customers’ favorite choice. It’s the ideal color for ornamental water features as it contrasts perfectly with lush green landscaping.
  • Do you prefer a more natural look? Try Twilight Blue™ dye. It maintains a neutral blackish-blue tint that shades and protects your pond without making drastic changes to its natural coloring.
  • Do you want to showcase your landscape? Consider using Black DyeMond™ dye. It creates a mirrored surface that reflects surrounding trees and natural rocky landscapes, making it perfect for natural ponds in wooded areas.

We recommend you use pond dye year-round. Pond Logic® Pond Dye is a concentrated formula that you simply pour in several spots along your pond’s edge. Apply it monthly or as needed to maintain the blue or black hue all year long. Pond Logic® Pond Dye PLUS is the same formula as our traditional pond dye – but we’ve added beneficial bacteria to the mix to help keep your pond looking crystal clear.

Pond Talk: What’s your favorite pond dye – and why?

Protect and Shade Your Pond- Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye

My pond has some filamentous algae growth around the edges. It’s too cold to treat, right? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: My pond has some filamentous algae growth around the edges. It’s too cold to treat, right?

Q: My pond has some filamentous algae growth around the edges. It’s too cold to treat, right?

Jeff – Hanahan, SC

A: Cold-weather algae. It’s the worst. And, unfortunately, you can’t treat it right now because the temperatures are too low. Your pond or lake’s water temps need to be higher than 60°F before you can start treating the green stuff with algaecide.

So until things heat up, you have two options:

  1. Rake It Out: If you can safely access and maneuver around your pond, grab your Pond & Beach Rake and get to work skimming and pulling that filamentous algae out of the water and up onshore.
  2. Add Some Color: Pond Dye will limit the amount of sunshine that reaches the algae. Without enough sun, the algae can’t survive. So toss a Pond Dye water-soluble packet or some liquid concentrate into your pond – and your problem is solved!

Once your water temperatures rise above 50°F, start adding PondClear™ & MuckAway™ to the pond. The beneficial bacteria will clear the water and start breaking down the debris and nutrients that are feeding that troublesome algae.

Pond Talk: How much time do you spend puttering around your pond or lake in the winter?

Protect Your Pond in All Seasons - Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye Quarts

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