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When do I stop using my ClearPAC® products for the season? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When do I stop using my ClearPAC® products for the season?

Q: When do I stop using my ClearPAC® products for the season?

Brenda – Martinsburg

A: An incredibly handy product, Pond Logic® ClearPAC® and ClearPac® PLUS come packaged with everything you need to keep your pond or lake clean and clear all season long, including Algae Defense®, PondClear™, MuckAway™ (in PLUS only), EcoBoost™ and Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye. Each component has different usage recommendations. Here’s what you need to know about using each one in the fall and wintertime:

Algae Defense®: You can stop using this algae killer when the water dips below 60° Fahrenheit. Though you might see green growth during the winter, the active ingredients in Algae Defense® are ineffective at lower temperatures.

PondClear™ & MuckAway™: The beneficial bacteria that make up PondClear™ and MuckAway™ won’t work well when the water temperatures are lower than 50°F. Save the little muck and debris munchers for spring when the sun has warmed your pond or lake.

EcoBoost™: Formulated to bind suspended organics, EcoBoost™ helps to clear water, enhances beneficial bacteria and provides trace minerals to fish. It has no temperature restrictions, so it can be used all year round!

Pond Dye: Pond Dye can also be used year-round to shade your pond or lake, and bring beauty and color to your landscape. If it’s too cold to dump the Pond Dye concentrated liquid in the water, try using our Pond Dye Packets. You simply drop the easy-to-use water-soluble packets in various spots in your lake and in a short time the color will diffuse throughout the water.

Hopefully this has “cleared up” when and how to use the products in ClearPAC™.

Pond Talk: What is your favorite product in the ClearPAC® or ClearPAC® PLUS?

Bind Phosphates and Suspended Organics - Pond Logic® EcoBoost™

I hear about being proactive, but what are PondClear™ and MuckAway™, and how does it help my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I hear about being proactive, but what are PondClear™ and MuckAway™, and how does it help my pond?

Q: I hear about being proactive, but what are PondClear™ and MuckAway™, and how does it help my pond?

Ed – Cambridge, NY

A: Your agricultural pond or fish-filled lake faces an unseen threat: an inorganic chemical called phosphate. Found in many fertilizers used in farming applications, phosphates do wonders for helping plants to grow—but when they leech into your pond or lake after a heavy rain, they can fuel algae blooms that can ultimately do harm to your fish population, not to mention being unsightly and malodorous.

Though it may be difficult to prevent those phosphates from finding their way into your water, you can take a proactive approach to minimize the algae growth and protect your fish. This involves binding and removing the phosphates, cleaning up the water column and breaking down accumulated muck.

And that’s where EcoBoost™, PondClear™ and MuckAway™ come into play. They’re the one-two-three punch your pond needs to stay healthy.

Bind the Phosphates

EcoBoost™, which is found in ClearPAC® PLUS, grabs hold of the algae-stimulating phosphates and other suspended organics in your pond, allowing the beneficial bacteria in PondClear™ and MuckAway™ to grow and gobble through excess nutrients in the water. EcoBoost contains more than 80 trace minerals to promote fish health and fast growth, as well as helping to create clean and clear water that your finned friends will appreciate!

Clean the Water

PondClear™ is designed to clean the water from the top down. It contains beneficial bacteria that devour excess nutrients that are suspended in the water, which feed algae. The natural bacteria digest the organic debris, leaving behind water that’s clean and clear while promoting a healthy ecosystem for your lake’s inhabitants.

Remove the Muck

MuckAway™ cleans the water from the bottom up. The pellets sink to the bottom of your pond and release beneficial bacteria that eat away at any accumulated pond muck. The result is improved water clarity and reduced odor. With regular use, MuckAway™ can break down up to 5 inches of muck per year—and that means less nutrients to feed algae blooms.

Keep in mind that these products will take some time to kick in. It took a long time for the muck and debris to collect in your pond or lake, and so it won’t disappear overnight. Be patient and follow the dosage schedule, and you’ll ultimately be pleased with the results.

Pond Talk: What algae-prevention strategy do you follow?

Remove Excess Nutrients & Noxious Odros - Pond Logic® PondClear™

Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Jeremy – Clinton, IA

A: It sure doesn’t take much for algae to grow out of control! Combine warm sunshine with some algae-loving nutrients and, before long, you’ll have a pond full of pea soup. When it’s thick and dense, those tiny plants can then suck all the oxygen from the water, leaving your fish gasping for air. Plus, it looks bad and can cause some major stink.

For the health of your fish and your lake, you must regain control. Here’s a two-pronged approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over.

TREAT THE GROWTH

First, you need to get rid of the algae blooms. For floating algae and chara that’s less than 3 feet deep, use Algae Defense®. The aquatic algaecide comes in a fast-acting liquid formula that can be directly applied to your lake with a pressurized sprayer. If you’re dealing with chara that’s deeper than 3 feet, use Cutrine®-Plus. Its granular formula sinks to the bottom of your lake and destroys the algae.

Once the algaecides start working to kill the blooms, don’t forget to remove dead algae from the pond with a tool like the Pond Rake. If you leave the dead foliage in the lake, will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

TREAT THE SOURCE

Now that you’ve got the algae under control, it’s time to get proactive and prevent its future growth. Begin by adding PondClear™ & MuckAway™. These products contain beneficial bacteria that gobble through excess nutrients like suspended organic waste and muck in your pond. The result: Clean and clear water with no noxious odors.

Next, shade the water with pond dye. By preventing the sun’s rays from penetrating the water, you’ll starve the algae of sunlight, which it needs to thrive.

ONE-STOP SHOPPING

Looking for an easy solution? Check out the ClearPAC® PLUS. This all-in-one algae destroyer contains everything you’ll need to kill the algae and prevent future growth. It contains algaecide, beneficial bacteria and pond dye to fight algae and suspended debris all season long.

Pond Talk: How do you prevent excess nutrients from entering your pond or lake?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS Combo

Which is better for my pond? PondClear™ or MuckAway™? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Which is better for my pond? PondClear™ or MuckAway™?

Mitch – Syracuse, NY

A: PondClear™ and MuckAway™ have their similarities and differences. They both are chemical free, safe to use in recreational ponds, and contain aerobic bacteria that naturally work to break down dead organic material in your pond or lake. They differ however, by targeting different types of debris.

Pond Logic® PondClear™ Beneficial Bacteria focuses on debris that’s suspended in the water column. The floating material may cause your pond or lake to appear cloudy. The beneficial microorganisms in PondClear™ consume and digest that suspended organic matter, leaving you with clean, clear, odor-free water and a healthy ecosystem. It’s even safe to use in ponds and lakes that water horses, livestock, pets, birds and other wildlife, as well as those that contain game fish.

Pond Logic® MuckAway™ Pond Muck Reducer focuses on sunken organic debris – also known as pond muck – that has accumulated along the beach, shoreline or pond bottom. The MuckAway™ pellets sick below the water’s surface and dissolve, releasing hungry beneficial bacteria that instantly begin consuming and digesting the settled debris. The all-natural muck buster is perfect for spot-treating trouble areas or managing material in canals or lake-front properties. As with PondClear™, MuckAway™ is safe to use around horses, livestock, pets, birds, wildlife and in lakes that contain game fish.

When used as directed, both PondClear™ and MuckAway™ will begin working right away and, in most cases, you can expect to see real results within one month of use. Of course, each pond is different; the longer the muck has had to accumulate, the longer it will take to be devoured by the bacteria.

To give the microorganisms a performance boost, add an aeration system to the pond and increase the water’s circulation. Aerobic bacteria require oxygen to live, thrive and reproduce. An aeration system, such as the Airmax® Deep Water Aeration System or the Kasco Surface Aerator, will diffuse O2 into the water while increasing the water’s movement and exposure to surface oxygen.

So before you add PondClear™ or MuckAway™ to your pond or lake, make sure you choose the product that targets your particular situation.

Pond Talk: Which bothers you more: cloudy water or pond muck? Why?

Pond Logic® MuckAway™ - Naturally Eliminate Pond Muck

What Can I Do To Reduce Or Remove Cattails From My Pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: What can I do to reduce or remove cattails from my pond?

Ryan – Bradford, PA

A: Cattails, when left unchecked, can proliferate and take over a pond or lake in no time. These common aquatic plants grow from 3 to 10 feet tall in dense colonies around the margins of ponds and lakes. In the spring, the green strap-like foliage grows from large, creeping, below-the-ground rhizomes. As the seasons progress, the cattail’s leaves and spikes – or the plant’s brown cylindrical flower – grow. And when the flowers open and let loose their cottony seeds, the cattails spread and propagate new plants throughout the lake.

Cattails can indeed be a nuisance. Granted, a small, managed area of cattails will provide an ideal habitat for amphibians, insects, birds and fish, as well as helping to prevent erosion. But too many of these plants can create an unappealing look and begin to transform a healthy lake or pond into marshland.

Controlling cattails involves a simple three-step process: You’ll need to spray an herbicide to kill the plants themselves, cut the leaves and spikes down and remove them, and retreat as necessary.

Step 1: Treat the Plants

The most common way to control cattails is to apply an EPA-registered herbicide and surfactant product, like Shoreline Defense®, using a pressurized pond sprayer, such as the The Pond Guy® Pond Sprayer. Read the product labels for proper dosage rates for your size lake. To treat a 2,500-square-foot area of weeds, mix 8 ounces of Shoreline Defense® with 2 gallons of water and 4 ounces of Treatment Booster™ Plus, pour into pond sprayer and apply onto actively growing plants and at least 18 inches above the water surface where the cattails are growing. Allow the mixture to absorb into the plant and the root system, which is the most difficult part of the plant to kill, for one to two weeks.

Step 2: Cut, Remove the Stalks

Once the herbicide has had a chance to soak into the cattail’s root system, the plant will turn brown and become limp. At this point, you should remove the stalks. Doing so prevents muck accumulation, and it also makes it easier to treat and remove new cattails in the future as they will come up between the dead stalks. Cut the stalks using the Weed Cutter or the Jenlis Weed Razer™ Pro Aquatic Weed Cutter at the base of the plants, allowing for easier removal with your Rake.

Step 3: Retreat as Needed

To completely eradicate cattails in a pond, this process may need to be repeated – and repeated and repeated because not all cattail roots will be killed by one treatment. But once you have the plants under control, they can make a nice addition to your landscape and encourage wildlife to call your pond or lake home. Just don’t let the cattails take over again!

Pond Talk: How large of an area do you have in your lake or pond that’s devoted to cattails?

Why Does Algae Keep Growing In My Pond, Even After I Treat With Algaecides? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Why does algae keep growing in my pond, even after I treat with algaecides?

Cathy – Bagley, WI

A: Algae seems to take on a life of its own sometimes, doesn’t it? Once that green slimy, stringy or seaweed-looking stuff crops up, it keeps growing and growing until you wind up with a messy situation in your pond or lake. Even if you treat it with algaecides, it still grows back.

Turns out that all these tiny plants need to grow is sunlight and food source – both of which are abundant during certain sunny times of year and when there’s a healthy mix of detritus built up along the bottom of the lake. To make things worse (or better for the algae!), when a pond is treated with chemicals, the process just adds dead algae to the pond, which is actually a food source for the growing algae.

Rather than battle this green monster after it has a foothold, it’s best to take a proactive approach. After you verify that you’re dealing with algae and not weeds (read here for a quick lesson on chara and other types of algae), we recommend you follow these four all-natural steps for preventing algae attacks:

1. Use Aeration: Aeration systems, like Airmax Aeration®, circulates debris that has accumulated in the lake or pond so it doesn’t settle at the bottom and become algae food. Aeration also spreads the debris throughout the water column, making it more accessible to beneficial bacteria that break it down.

2. Use Natural Bacteria: Natural beneficial bacteria, such as Pond Logic® PondClear™ Beneficial Bacteria, power through nitrates, breaking down fish waste, leaves and other organics that accumulate in the pond. This naturally improves the water clarity as the bacteria devour the sediment.

3. Use EcoBoost™: Pond Logic® EcoBoost™ Bacteria Enhancer is an innovative product that binds algae-feeding phosphates in ponds and stimulates the growth of essential beneficial bacteria, which are essential when controlling algae in your lake or pond.

4. Use Pond Dye: Because algae thrive in sunlight, Pond Dye filters those rays and stops them from reaching below the surface, thereby preventing algae from growing. Plus, the cool colors mask the soupy green hue of the algae.

We can’t guarantee your algae problem will disappear, but if you follow these steps you’ll be creating a pond that’s inhospitable to algae invaders.

Pond Talk: How have your algae blooms been this spring and summer compared to last year?

Airmax® Aeration Systems - Even Ponds Need To Breathe

Will Algaecides & Herbicides Harm My Beneficial Bacteria? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Will Algaecides & Herbicides Harm My Beneficial Bacteria?

Kenneth – Lawton, OK

Some chemical treatments can affect the performance of your beneficial bacteria. It’s best to wait 72 hours after a chemical treatment to add bacteria. Certain chemical treatments contain copper, and copper can reduce the effectiveness of bacteria. If you wait a few days, you’ll ensure no loss of bacteria from a chemical interaction and the bacteria will have a lot of newly killed weeds to feed on. If you can’t wait, apply bacteria away from the treated areas of your pond. For example, if you put chemicals around the edge of your pond, add bacteria such Pond Logic® PondClear™, to the center. This will prevent the chance of overlapping chemicals with natural bacteria.

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