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Does the type of algae and where it’s growing determine what chemical is needed? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Does the type of algae and where it’s growing determine what chemical is needed?

Q: Does the type of algae and where it’s growing determine what chemical is needed?

Pete – Addison, AL

A: When battling algae, you have the upper hand if you understand the enemy. What type of algae is it? How does it behave? What are its strengths and weaknesses? Before we get in to how to treat the green menace, let’s discuss the different varieties and where they live in an aquatic ecosystem.

Algae Explained

In a large pond or lake planktonic algae, filamentous algae and chara, are the most common types of algae you’ll come across.

  • Planktonic algae, the source of algae blooms, are floating, microscopic plants that color pond water shades of green, blue-green, brown or variations in between. In controlled amounts, this type of algae can actually be beneficial. It can shade the pond’s bottom, preventing subsurface nuisance plants from growing.
  • Filamentous algae are single-celled plants that form long, visible chain, threads or filaments. These threads, which start growing along the bottom of the lake in shallow water or on rocks or other aquatic plants, intertwine and form mats that resemble wet wool. When these mats rise to the surface, they’re commonly referred to as pond scum.
  • Chara is a gray-green branched multicellular algae that has 6 to 16 leaf-like branchlets that grow in spirals around the stem. Though bottom-growing chara superficially resembles terrestrial plants, it lacks flowers, true leaves and roots. It has a skunky, musty, garlicky-type smell and has a crunchy- or grit-type texture, thanks to calcium carbonate deposits on its surface.

In general, algae will grow just about anywhere sun penetrates the pond. Surprisingly, algae has some benefits: The tiny plants feed fish and make great homes for micro- and macro-invertebrates like bugs and worms. But algae has its definite drawbacks. Besides being unsightly and odorous, uncontrolled blooms can cause oxygen depletions, affect fish health and, in extreme circumstances, cause fish to die.

Vanquishing the Menace

The key to successfully treating algae – whether planktonic, filamentous or chara – is to make the most contact between it and the algaecide. Rather than dumping the chemical into one place in the pond, which will only kill algae in that small area, it needs to be evenly dispersed.

Floating mats of filamentous algae and suspended planktonic algae are best treated with liquid mixtures, like Algae Defense® and Clipper™, that are sprayed directly over the area with a pond sprayer. To treat extra thick mats, stick the top of the sprayer into the mat itself to get the chemical to the deeper portion of the problem.

For bottom-growing algae, use granular algaecide, like Cutrine®-Plus Granular and Hydrothol, and distribute it with a granular spreader. It’s the preferred choice because the granules will sink over the algae bed and make maximum contact with it.

Follow up by raking out any decaying or dead debris with the Pond & Beach Rake, setting up an aeration system and adding natural bacteria, such as the types found in ClearPAC® PLUS Pond Care Package.

Pond Talk: How much time do you spend battling algae in your pond or lake?

Spray Directly Onto Algae Blooms - Pond Logic® Algae Defense®

A friend suggested I use pond dye. I’m nervous because we swim in the pond. Is it safe, and which one do I use? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: A friend suggested I use pond dye. I’m nervous because we swim in the pond. Is it safe, and which one do I use?

Q: A friend suggested I use pond dye. I’m nervous because we swim in the pond. Is it safe, and which one do I use?

Wayne – Camden, NC

A: You have a wise friend! Pond Dye can provide some important benefits to your pond. It helps to shade the water from the sun’s rays, and create drama and aesthetic appeal in your landscape.

Safe and Non-Staining

If you’re worried about the dye coloring your skin when you swim, don’t worry: After 24 hours of being applied to the pond, the dye will not stain. The concentrated form, however, is a different story. It will turn your hands colors, so be sure to wear gloves and work clothes when adding dye to your pond.

Once mixed with the water in your pond, pond dye is completely safe for agriculture and irrigation purposes. Immediately after treatment, you can use your pond for recreation, fishing and other activities. It’s safe for swimming ponds, as well as watering horses, livestock, birds, pets, fish and wildlife.

Color Choices Aplenty

Pond dye color is really a matter of personal preference, but different shades are better suited to different situations. When selecting one, first consider your environment and what looks natural in your surroundings. Then ask yourself these questions:

  • Do you have a decorative pond or lake? Try Nature’s Blue™ dye or The Pond Guy® PondShade™ Blue– our customers’ favorite choice. It’s the ideal color for large ponds that double as a view as it contrasts perfectly with lush green landscaping. Folks in the Great Lakes area may feel more at home with a natural blue color.
  • Do you prefer a more natural look? Try Twilight Blue™ dye. It maintains a neutral blackish-blue tint that shades and protects your pond without making drastic changes to its natural coloring.
  • Do you want to showcase your landscape? Consider using Black DyeMond™ dye. It creates a mirrored surface that reflects surrounding trees and natural rocky landscapes, making it perfect for natural ponds in wooded areas.

Application Process

Adding dye to your pond or lake is easy. Every four to six weeks (or as needed depending on rainfall and evaporation), simply pour the concentrated Pond Dye into the water in several spots along the pond’s edge, or drop the easy-to-use water-soluble Pond Dye Packets in the water. Easy peasy!

If you notice your pond is full of suspended debris, you may want to try Pond Dye PLUS. It contains both dye and the beneficial bacteria that’s found in PondClear™, so it will both shade your pond and help clear the water.

Pond Talk: What’s your favorite shade of pond dye?

Convenient Water Soluble Packets - The Pond Guy® PondShade™ Blue

Do I just throw MuckAway tablets into the pond from the shore? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Do I just throw MuckAway tablets into the pond from the shore?

Q: Do I just throw MuckAway tablets into the pond from the shore?

Rich – Callahan, FL

A: MuckAway™ Pond Muck Reducer does a number on muck. The special blend of aerobic beneficial bacteria digests organic debris (a.k.a. muck), improves water clarity and eliminates noxious odors. The precision-release pellets are easy to use, and they’re perfect for battling built-up sludge anywhere in your pond.

But there is a way to best apply MuckAway™. Here’s what we recommend.

  • Disburse Evenly: Whether you’re using MuckAway™ near the shoreline or across your entire pond, the pellets will need to be spread evenly across the treatment area. Plan to use one scoop per 1,000 square feet.
  • Use a Boat: If you are treating the entire pond or lake, consider using a boat for uniform MuckAway™ dispersal. Individual tablets that are spread very far apart (tossed from the shore) will not have as dramatic an impact on muck as those that are densely and evenly distributed.
  • Consider MuckAway™ TL: A large pond or lake may need the super sludge-busting power of MuckAway™ TL Pond Muck Reducer. When used as directed, it’s designed to break down up to 2″ of muck per month!
  • Combine Forces: Many customers choose to use a one-two punch when contending with water clarity issues. They’ll use PondClear™ Beneficial Bacteria water soluble packets to clean and clear the water column, and MuckAway™ or MuckAway™ TL to break down the sunken muck around often-used areas, like the pond perimeter and beach areas.

You can increase the effectiveness of MuckAway™ and MuckAway™ TL by raking out any large, long-to-decompose debris from the pond before you begin treatments. This allows those aerobic beneficial bacteria to target the fine debris that’s difficult to remove.

Airmax® Aeration is also key to helping your bacteria be more effective at battling muck. The moving, aerated water provides both oxygen and circulation, which creates an ideal environment for MuckAway™ or MuckAway™ TL to flourish. Looking for proof? Check out our Fox Lake Field Study. It shows the results of what happens to muck when MuckAway™ TL and aeration are used together.

Pond Talk: How do you use MuckAway™ in your pond or lake?

Remove Up To 5 Inches of Muck Per Year - Pond Logic® MuckAway™

Do you really need to add EcoBoost? What is the best way to apply it? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Do you really need to add EcoBoost? What is the best way to apply it?

Q: Do you really need to add EcoBoost? What is the best way to apply it?

Becky – Easley, SC

A: If you want to get the most out of your beneficial bacteria, control excess amounts of nutrients and have a pond full of healthy fish, you need to add Pond Logic® EcoBoost™ to your maintenance routine. Think of it like a multivitamin for your pond; it enhances what you already do to create a clean, clear ecosystem.

Here’s what you need to know about the benefits of EcoBoost™ and how to effectively use it in your pond or lake.

Benefits Aplenty

EcoBoost™ has three main functions. It binds excess phosphates, enhances the growth of natural bacteria and adds trace minerals that fish need to thrive.

Phosphates – which enter a pond or lake via lawn fertilizer and storm drain runoff – can wreak havoc in an aquatic ecosystem. They act as algae and aquatic plant growth steroids, causing algae blooms, weed proliferation and muck buildup. If left untreated, the result is oxygen depletion and poor fish health.

EcoBoost™ helps to control those phosphates, and in doing so it acts as a boost for the natural bacteria living in your pond. As the beneficial microorganisms found in MuckAway™ and PondClear™ gobble through organic debris on the bottom of your pond and suspended in the water column, EcoBoost™ binds excess phosphates and removes them from the water.

In addition, more than 80 trace minerals found in EcoBoost™ promote fish health and fast growth. It’s also safe for other aquatic critters as well as horses, livestock, birds, pets and wildlife.

Easy to Apply

EcoBoost™ comes as a powder that you simply mix with 2 to 3 gallons water in a pail and pour along the shoreline of your lake. You can apply it every two weeks, or on a routine schedule along with MuckAway™ and PondClear™. It has no temperature restrictions, so you can use it all year long.

If you use chemical algaecides or herbicides, be sure to wait for three days before adding EcoBoost™ and your beneficial bacteria products.

This spring, try adding EcoBoost™ to your maintenance routine. You’ll enjoy clear water and healthier game fish.

Pond Talk: What plans do you have for your pond or lake once spring finally arrives?

Bind Excess Phosphates - Pond Logic® EcoBoost™

My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it?

Q: My pond is full of floating algae. How do I get rid of it?

C.J.- Dumas, AR

A: With summer temperatures settling in, algae blooms are coming out swinging. Bright sunshine and warm temperatures trigger green growth, so it’s critical to keep floating and submerged algae in check before it grows out of control.

For the health of your pond and its inhabitants, keeping algae blooms to a minimum is necessary. Here’s an approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over:

Treat the Growth
First, use an algaecide to great rid of the algae bloom. You can treat floating algae with a fast-acting liquid spray like Algae Defense® Algaecide with Treatment Booster™ PLUS, which treats floating algae and chara that’s less than 3’ deep. Simply spray it on with a pressurized sprayer to combat floating and bottom-growing algae.

Submerged algae can be treated with sinking granular products, such as Cutrine®-Plus. It works well for algae submerged deep in your pond or lake, such as Chara. It’s best distributed on a calm day via a granular spreader in the morning before mats form.

Remove the Dead Algae
Once the algae is dead, you should remove it. Why? By leaving the dead foliage in the lake, it will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

Use a pond skimmer, like the PondSkim™, or a rake, like the Pond & Beach Rake, to prevent that muck from accumulating.

Add Beneficial Bacteria
Three days after you’ve used algaecides, treat your pond with PondClear™. It contains beneficial bacteria that gobbles through the organic material that’s suspended in the water column. The result is a lake filled with clean, clear, odor-free water—and a healthy ecosystem for your game fish and other pond inhabitants.

Shade Water with Pond Dye
Finally, be sure to add blue or black pond dye to your pond throughout the spring and summer. By reducing the amount of sunlight that shines through the water and stimulates plant growth, you will ultimately reduce the amount of algae.

Pond Talk: How do you keep your algae blooms in check?

Fast Acting Liquid Formula, Eliminate Algae - Pond Logic(r) Algae Defense(r) Algaecide

Why should I aerate my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Why should I aerate my pond?

Q: Why should I aerate my pond?

Marty – Crivitz, WI

A: We talk a lot about the importance of aeration in this blog – and for good reason. Aeration with the Airmax® Aeration System, which involves diffusing oxygen into the water below the surface, benefits the quality of your farm pond or lake in myriad ways, including these top five reasons:

  1. Reduces Pond Muck: Aeration cuts the nutrient load, like pond muck and other decomposing debris, in your pond. How? The increased oxygen and water movement provided by aeration helps to encourage the colonization of beneficial aerobic bacteria. These bacteria are responsible for digesting and preventing muck and nutrient accumulation.
  2. Boosts Oxygen Levels: Aeration also increases the amount of oxygen in your lake’s water. Beneath the water surface, the diffuser plates release tiny bubbles of oxygen. They disperse and circulate throughout the water column, providing life-sustaining O2 to beneficial bacteria, fish and submerged plants.
  3. Eliminates Thermocline: Aeration circulates the water and eliminates thermocline, which is a stratified layer of water between the warmer, surface zone and the colder, deep-water zone. Bottom diffuser aeration churns and mixes those temperature layers. The tiny air bubbles force the cooler oxygen-starved water to the pond’s surface where it becomes infused up with O2. The warmer, oxygen-rich water then drops down, fueling the beneficial bacteria.
  4. Improves Water Quality: By reducing the pond muck, increasing oxygen and circulating the water column, your water quality will improve. You’ll see reduced algae growth, clearer water, and happier, healthier fish.
  5. Reduces Winter Fishkill: Aeration also protects your game fish in the winter. As organic debris decomposes in your pond, gases are released into the water column. These gases become trapped when your pond freezes over, which reduces the amount of clean oxygen. If enough oxygen is displaced, your fish will suffocate. Running an aerator pumps fresh O2 in the water while maintaining a hole in the ice for gas exchange.

Pond Talk: What benefits have you seen in your pond or lake after adding an aeration system?

Keep Your Pond Healthy All Year - Airmax(r) Pond Series(tm) Aeration Systems

The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Sharon – Waynesboro, GA

A: Inside your ClearPAC® PLUS box, you’ll find everything you need to keep your lake clean and clear this spring and summer. The five components, when used as directed, address the root of the most common pond problems by tackling excess nutrients and shielding the water from algae-feeding sunlight.
When should you start using ClearPAC® PLUS? It all depends on your water temperature. Let’s take a closer look at when and how to best use the products in your super-pack.

  • Pond Dye: As soon as the ice melts on your pond or lake, add your Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye. The dye is not temperature-sensitive so it can be used even when water temps are too cold for beneficial bacteria products. Pond Dye does more than color your water and add to your landscape’s aesthetic; it also shades it from sunlight, which can kick-start algae blooms as the mercury rises.
  • PondClear™ and MuckAway™: When water temperatures rise to a consistent 50°F, you can start using the beneficial bacteria found in PondClear™ and MuckAway™ to break down nutrients suspended in your water column and muck on the bottom of your pond. These products can be used at the same time as your Pond Dye and EcoBoost™.
  • EcoBoost™: This bacteria booster that has no temperature restrictions, so it can be used year-round to bind phosphates that find their way into your pond or lake. You can use EcoBoost™ throughout the spring to give you a head start on pond season.
  • Algae Defense® : To be used only as needed, this algae-destroyer treats troublesome floating filamentous algae, bottom growing chara and the planktonic algae when it’s green and growing. Use Algae Defense® when the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60°F. Don’t use Algae Defense® if you keep koi or trout in your lake.

After treating your pond with ClearPAC® PLUS, don’t forget to remove dead algae and debris with your Pond & Beach Rake. Doing so will remove the decaying vegetation and prevent them from feeding the algae—which will ultimately help your Pond Dye, PondClear™, MuckAway™, EcoBoost™ and Algae Defense® work even better!

Pond Talk: Has spring sprung in your area of the country?

Keep Your Pond Clean and Clear - Pond Logic(r) ClearPAC® PLUS

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