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I have an old sump pump. Can I use it to create a fountain for my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I have an old sump pump. Can I use it to create a fountain for my pond?

Q: I have an old sump pump. Can I use it to create a fountain for my pond?

Nick – Linwood, KS

A: Sounds like you want to do some “upcycling” and save a little money while making use of old equipment that’s sitting around. What a fun project, and something you can show off to your friends!

Yes, you can certainly transform that old sump pump into a fountain for your pond – but whether it works will depend on what you want to do with that fountain.

Sump Pump Fountain?

A sump pump is traditionally used to remove water that’s collected in a basement. It pumps the water away from the house to a place where it’s no longer problematic. It’s not really designed for long-term continuous use, and so using a sump pump to create a spraying fountain might decrease its life expectancy. Replacing it could be costly.

There are other factors to consider, too. A sump pump might cost more to operate. You’ll still need to create a way to anchor or suspend the motor and create a spray. And you’ll need to extend the power cord long enough to reach a power source safely – which will require trial and error or fancy engineering.

If you’re a build-it-yourselfer in search of a challenge and plan to not use it for long-term continuous use, go for it! If not, consider purchasing an actual fountain.

Out-of-the-Box Easy

For those who are looking for an easy, cost-effective and trouble-free way to add some splash to a pond, buying a pre-manufactured decorative fountain has its benefits, including:

  • They come with pumps that are designed to be used as a fountain, so they create much more water movement and a heavier spray that’s less affected by wind and pump-clogging floating debris.
  • They can be used as an aeration system in ponds less than 6 feet deep.
  • All the engineering work is done for you! After a quick installation, you’ll have a decorative spray and a power cord that’s long enough to reach the shore.
  • Some, like the AquaStream™ Fountain and Light Combo Kits, come with decorative options, like lights and different spray patterns.

Whichever you choose, it’s always a great idea to create movement and aerate the water. Your fish and plants will appreciate it, and you – and your guests – will, too!

Pond Talk: Have you ever made a decorative fountain with upcycled pieces and parts?

Enjoy the Sound of a Fountain - The Pond Guy® AquaStream™ 1/2 HP Fountain

I have scum on the surface of my pond like last year but I can’t scoop it out, is it algae? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I have scum on the surface of my pond like last year but I can’t scoop it out, is it algae?

Q: I have scum on the surface of my pond like last year but I can’t scoop it out, is it algae?

Clare – Westford, VT

A: It sounds like that strange stuff floating in your pond is pollen – particularly if you’ve had the same issue at about the same time in previous years. How do you identify it and get rid of it? Read on to learn more about fixing your pollen problem.

Just on the Surface

Looking like an oil slick floating on top of your pond, the pollen’s hue may vary in shade from white to yellow to green, particularly if there’s a little algae mixed in. The substance will break apart if you run your fingers through it, and it often forms a circle around aeration plates.

The tiny pieces of pollen stay on the surface thanks to something called surface tension. Pollen is light, and when it lands on still water that’s not moving it remains there. Unless something breaks the water tension, like rain or the splash from a fountain, the pollen will continue to float and coat the water surface.

Saying ‘Goodbye’ to Pollen

If you want to get rid of that unsightly pollen, here’s what we recommend:

  1. Add Aeration: Aeration, like our Airmax® Aeration Systems, churns and moves the water below the surface, and that action will help break down the surface tension from the bottom up. We offer a range of aerator sizes to fit any pond, from small ornamental features to large water gardens or fish ponds.
  2. Add Some Splash: While the aerator cycles the subsurface water, a decorative fountain like our AquaStream™ Fountains, or even a garden hose (in desperation!) will break the water tension and dissipate the pollen. Check out the different styles, sizes and spray patterns of our fountains – they look great and work hard!
  3. Wait It Out: Pollen will eventually dissipate with the changing of the season or after a heavy rain. If you’re patient and wait it out, the problem will resolve on its own.

Green Be Gone

Is the pollen in your pond a bit green? You could be battling an algae and pollen problem. In addition to resolving the situation with aeration and a decorative fountain, use Algae Defense®. It’s a fast-acting, algae-killing liquid formula that can be applied directly to your pond with a sprayer – so it’ll destroy the green stuff and dissipate the pollen.

Pond Talk: How has pollen been treating your pond (and your seasonal allergies!) this year?

Improve Your Pond's Appearance - The Pond Guy® AquaStream™ 1/2 HP Fountain

Will my fountain be enough to keep my fish safe this winter?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q:Will my fountain be enough to keep my fish safe this winter?

Q: Will my fountain be enough to keep my fish safe this winter?

Holly – Gorham, ME

A: If your pond freezes over in the winter, a fountain won’t do you or your fish much good. It’s not designed to be run or left in the pond during icy conditions. The ice can damage the float or create a barrier that prevents water from passing through the spray nozzle. That could cause the motor to run dry and stop working. And that’s not good.

Instead, we recommend completely removing your fountain and a run a bottom diffused aeration system instead.

Before the Ice Forms

Autumn is the perfect time to remove the fountain from your pond before the ice forms. When unplugging the motor and pulling it ashore; inspect the cords, motor and lights for any damage. After sitting in a pond all summer, chances are you will have to clean the fountain and lenses from any algae, build up or debris. Once your fountain is ready to be stored, place it in doors until spring.

Below the Surface

Now that you have removed the fountain from the pond, it is a good idea to protect both your fish and boating dock from ice damage by adding an aeration system. Aeration keeps the oxygen levels up and the water circulating. Depending on how close the diffuser plates are to the surface or dock, aeration can also keep a hole open for gas exchange, and provide a place for ducks to gather when everything else is frozen over.

Keep your fish safe and happy this winter by giving them surface and subsurface aeration. They’ll appreciate it more than just your fountain!

Pond Talk: How much aeration do you have in your pond or lake during the winter?

Shade & Prevent Damage From Winter Ice - Airmax (r) Shallow Series (t) Aeration Systems

What is supercooling? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: What is supercooling??

Q: What is supercooling?

Aloma, Warroad, MN

A: Supercooling is uncommon, but it can occur in lakes and ponds, particularly in the northern states. Here’s what you need to know about it and how to prevent it from happening.

In the winter time water stratifies in pond and lakes without proper aeration when surface temperatures are extremely cold, creating what’s called a thermocline. A thermocline happens as warmer water about 39°F or so – sinks to the bottom, while colder water about 32°F or so – rises to the top. Very little mixing of the layers occurs, particularly in calm weather.

Supercooling could become an issue if you’re running a surface aeration system in shallow ponds with fish. The fish prefer to stay on the bottom of the pond in the warmer pockets of water during the winter. They’re in winter-hibernation mode, and all they want to do is be in a stress-free spot until spring.

As the aerator circulates the warmer water with the cooler water at the surface, the overall temperature could drop. In extreme cases when the temperatures are well below 0°F, the water temperature can actually drop below its freezing point without becoming a solid – a rare process known as supercooling.

If the water gets too cold, your fish have nowhere warm to go. Living without their warm hangout spot could compromise their oxygen supply and immune systems, making them vulnerable to parasites and diseases.

The best way to deliver oxygen to your fish is with a bottom diffused aerator, like an Airmax® Aeration System. You can keep it running without creating an inhospitable environment for your finned friends by simply moving your diffuser plates closer to the surface or turning half of them off.

If you relocate the diffuser plates to a spot that’s about half the depth of your pond or run only 50 percent of them, a pocket of warm water will remain for your fish at the bottom. You’ll continue pumping oxygen into the water and keeping a hole in the ice for gas exchange without having to worry about freezing your fish.

Pond Talk: What steps do you take to prevent over cooling or supercooling your pond?

Call (866) POND-HELP - Free Aerial Aeration Mapping Service

Isn’t my fountain enough aeration for my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Isn’t my fountain enough aeration for my pond?

Q: Isn’t my fountain enough aeration for my pond?

Kelly – Harrisville, WV

A: Fountains deserve a lot of love. As they launch water into the air, they add dramatic movement and visual appeal to the landscape. The sound of stirring water makes anyone within earshot relaxed and tranquil. Fountains add a good deal of oxygen to the pond as the tiny droplets make contact with the air and fall back into the pond. But do they provide enough aeration? It all depends on your pond’s depth.

More Than 6 Feet Deep…

If your pond is more than 6 feet deep, your fountain does not provide enough aeration. Why? The best way to aerate the pond is to circulate the entire body of water at the same time. Because a fountain draws water from the top of the water column only, the water deeper than the 6-foot mark remains untouched – and oxygen deprived.

An aeration system, like the Pond Series™ Aeration System, will pump air to the diffuser plate positioned at the bottom of the pond. The rising bubbles then lift and aerate the water from the bottom up, ensuring that the entire pond is circulated and oxygenated.

Less Than 6 Feet Deep…

If your pond is less than 6 feet deep, your fountain is good to go. Because enough oxygen is exchanged at the pond’s surface, you don’t need additional aeration – but you do need to worry about the fountain’s spray pattern and horsepower.

The most effective shape for aeration is the “V” shape or “Classic” pattern, like the one included in the AquaStream™ fountain. It does the job simply and effectively. The more decorative the spray pattern, the less likely it is to adequately aerate your pond because more energy is spent on creating the patterns than on moving the water.

As for horsepower, when using a fountain for aeration purposes, go with a 1.5 HP motor per acre. Remember that depending on your pond’s size and shape, you may need more than one fountain to properly aerate. If you’re using a fountain for decoration only, you can go with a 1 HP per acre motor instead.

Weighing the Cost

A fountain can be costly to operate, but an aeration system – which has lower operating costs when compared to a fountain running 24/7 – is an affordable alternative. Whichever method you choose, don’t go without aeration, because that could cost you more in the long run!

Pond Talk: What’s your favorite fountain? What makes it stand out to you?

For Optimal Aeration - Airmax® Pond Series™ Aeration Systems

When can I put my fountain back in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When can I put my fountain back in my pond?

Q: When can I put my fountain back in my pond?

John – Pataskala, OH

A: Fountains do more than create an attractive splash in your pond or lake. They also allow for greater gas exchange at the water’s surface, expelling dangerous ammonia and drawing in healthy oxygen for your fish and other sub-surface critters.

When spring rolls around, it’s time to reinstall your fountain – but before you do, be sure to check your Farmer’s Almanac or with your meteorologist. Make sure there’s little chance of the pond icing over again.

Once you’re sure that temps will remain above freezing, perform some quick maintenance tasks before submerging the fountain and anchoring it into position, including:

  • Clean It Up: Pull out a power washer and spray down the motor so built-up material doesn’t trap heat.
  • Check the Cord: Inspect the power cord for cuts.
  • Make It Muskrat-Proof: Protect the cord with ratcord (power cord sleeve) if you have muskrats in your area.
  • Maintenance Visit: Send the motor in for regular seal and oil maintenance if you haven’t done so in a few years.

When you put your fountain back into place, make sure the mooring lines are snug enough to keep it secure. When anchoring with blocks at the bottom of the pond, make sure the lines are spread far enough apart so the fountain doesn’t spin from the force of the motor, which could cause the lines to get tangled.

As soon as you’ve put your fountain back in place, add your first dose of Pond Dye to the water so the spraying action will disperse the color evenly. Nature’s Blue™ or Black DyeMond™ will shade the water, minimize algae blooms and give your landscape a natural-looking pop of color

Pond Talk: What’s your fountain’s favorite spray pattern?

Convenient Water-Soluble Packets - Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye Packets

When should I remove my fountain? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When should I remove my fountain?

Q: When should I remove my fountain?

Ray – McDermott, OH

A: Among your fall-preparation chores is removing the fountain and storing it for winter, particularly if you live in an area that endures freezing temperatures. Why? When ice forms, the cold stuff might damage the float. Or it could create a barrier that prevents water from passing through the spray nozzle, causing your fountain run dry and destroying your motor.

Your best bet: Remove the fountain before the ice begins to form. Sure, you could wait until a thin layer develops and then remove it—but that means you have to get wet and messy when it’s freezing. Not fun. Get a jump-start now before temperatures get too frigid.

Here are four easy steps to pulling out and storing your fountain for the winter:

  • Pull the Plug: Turn off the power to the fountain and pull it ashore. Most units have a quick disconnect at the motor that allows you separate the fountain from the main power cord.
  • Scrub Down: Wash down the fountain and float assembly to remove any algae or debris that has accumulated over the season. If you have a pressure washer, use it. It’ll make short work of even the dirtiest fountain.
  • Electrical Check: Inspect wiring and electrical cables for signs of wear or damage. If your fountain has lights, check for burned out or damaged bulbs and lenses.
  • Safe Storage: Once your fountain is cleaned and inspected, store it in an upright position in a climate-controlled location, like a heated pole barn or garage, until spring.

Now that it’s out and cleaned, you might want to consider sending your fountain to a licensed repair facility for routine maintenance tasks, including oil changes and/or seal replacements. Be sure to read through your user’s manual for special instructions and maintenance plans to keep your fountain running at its very best.

If you don’t plan on using the pond for ice skating or other winter recreation, now is a great time to install an Airmax® Aeration System to keep your pond oxygenated and healthy through the winter months. The aerator will circulate the water while keeping a hole in the ice surface, which will bring oxygen in and allow toxic gases to escape.

Pond Talk: How often do you have your fountain serviced by a licensed repair facility?

Aerate Your Pond in All Seasons - Airmax® Pond Series™ Aeration

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