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I’ve tried sprays and other types of bug control. Is there anything else I can do to reduce the mosquitoes by my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I’ve tried sprays and other types of bug control. Is there anything else I can do to reduce the mosquitoes by my pond?

Q: I’ve tried sprays and other types of bug control. Is there anything else I can do to reduce the mosquitoes by my pond?

Nancy – Lima, OH

A: Nothing ruins a pondside shindig faster than a swarm of blood-thirsty mosquitoes. The buzzing, biting, irritating bugs are the bane of pond owners. Besides causing itchy welts, these little pests can transmit dangerous and deadly diseases, like malaria, dengue, yellow fever, West Nile virus, dog heartworm and equine encephalitis.

Yep, they’re a nuisance—but their population can be controlled. Here’s what we recommend.

Remove Food Source

Ponds with lots of plant matter and algae are perfect for feeding baby mosquitoes. Those little wigglers and tumblers (technical terms for developing mosquito larvae and pupae) gobble through the greens, but you can minimize their feeding frenzy by maintaining your pond and eliminating their food source.

Move the Water

A female mosquito prefers to lay her eggs in stagnant water that’s full of algae, plankton, fungi and bacteria, so your next plan of attack should be to churn the water with a fountain, like our AquaStream™ Fountain, or an Airmax® Aeration System near the area where you sit. The waves will make her think twice about calling that part of your pond home.

Grasses Be Gone

Because adult mosquitoes live among the debris surrounding your pond, you want to keep those grasses cleared out. Use some herbicide, like Shoreline Defense®, to kill aquatic weeds and grasses. And pull out your weed removal tools, like your weed cutter, rake and debris skimmer, and remove the dead plants, overgrowth and other potential hiding spots – at least in the area where you hang out most often.

Help from Finned Friends

Mosquito-eating pond life, like tadpoles, minnow, bass, bluegill and catfish, love noshing on the little larvae and pupae. If you don’t already have a fish population living in your lake, consider adding some! The American Mosquito Control Association, in fact, recommends adding predacious minnows or native fish to lakes and ponds for biological control of the insects.

Use Mosquito Dunks or Bits

Mosquito dunks or bits are a lifesaver for folks with still ponds and other standing water pools on their property. These handy little disks or bits contain Bt-israelensis (Bt-i), a specially formulated biological pesticide designed to kill mosquito larvae. You simply toss them in your pond or lake and they’ll provide relief for up to 30 days. Plus, they’re safe for use around wildlife, pets and humans.

Unfortunately, mosquitoes are part of life with a lake or pond. With some pond and landscape maintenance, aeration, water movement, biological control and, if necessary, chemical control, however, you can keep the buzzing swarms at bay.

Pond Talk: What are some other ways you’ve tried to control lakeside mosquitos?

Control Mosquitos Up To 30 Days - Summit® Mosquito Bits® & Dunks®

If I treat my pond for weeds and it rains, will the treatment still work? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: If I treat my pond for weeds and it rains, will the treatment still work?

Q: If I treat my pond for weeds and it rains, will the treatment still work?

Amy – Linn Grove, IN

A: That all depends! Because you’re applying chemicals to water, you’d think that rain would have no affect on the herbicide—but it actually might. How long it rains, how heavily it rains and how soon it rained after you applied the treatment could impact its quality and effectiveness.

If wet stuff from the sky is a threat and you’re thinking about spraying algaecides or herbicides to control nuisance plants in your pond or lake, here are four general guidelines to follow:

  1. Check the Weather: Is steady rain forecast for the day? If so, postpone any treatment of emergent weeds. Many treatments need to be absorbed by the plant’s leaves to be effective. A day-long stint of rain will rinse the chemical off the weed before it can be fully absorbed.
  2. Check the Weather, Part II: If you’re expecting heavy precipitation, definitely put off treatment to another day. The applied chemical could rinse off the plants and overflow from the pond before being taken up by the target weed.
  3. Reapply If Necessary: A light sprinkle will generally not affect the chemical’s potency in a pond that’s already been treated. If a downpour occurs within a few hours of application, however, plan to reapply the herbicide in a few days to fully control that target plant.
  4. Make Your Treatment Count: Use a pond sprayer to apply the chemical as close to target weeds as possible, and use a sticky surfactant to help the chemical absorb into the plant like Treatment Booster™ PLUS. Treatment Booster™ PLUS breaks down the surface of the weed or algae and allows the active ingredient to penetrate.

Even though you’re treating aquatic weeds, wet weather can still impact the chemical’s effectiveness. Check the short- and long-term forecast and plan accordingly – because you don’t want all that hard work (and costly treatments) to be for nothing!

Pond Talk: How has the weather affected your pond or lake so far this summer?

Kill Persistent Weeds & Grasses - Shoreline Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS

Is it better to rake out as much of the weeds and algae as I can before treating? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Is it better to rake out as much of the weeds and algae as I can before treating?

Q: Is it better to rake out as much of the weeds and algae as I can before treating?

Sherry – Casselton, ND

A: It makes sense to want to remove as much of the plant nuisance as possible before spraying them with algaecides and herbicides. But, in general, it’s better to treat and kill the unwanted growth first – and then rake out the dead debris. Why? Let’s take a look at how weed and algae destroying chemicals work.

Contact Chemicals

A contact chemical, like Algae Defense®, needs to make contact with algae in order to kill it. If the chara, filamentous algae or planktonic algae are cut or broken into smaller pieces, it’s harder for the chemicals to make contact. Because algae grows by fragmentation rather than a defined root system, it’ll just keep on growing. So it’s better to leave the algae as-is before treating.

Systemic Chemicals

A systemic chemical, like Shoreline Defense®, works by being absorbed into the growth system of emergent shoreline weeds, like cattails, via their leaves and roots. As it does so, it kills the plants. Cutting the plants down stops the absorption process and prevents the chemical from getting into their system. As with contact chemicals, treat first.

Treat, Then Rake

After you’ve treated and killed the problem plants, then you should pull the dead debris from the pond with a weed cutter and rake. That will prevent all that decaying matter from becoming fertilizer for future algae blooms.

If you miss some of it, your aeration system and natural bacteria can do the work for you. An Airmax® Aeration system keeps the water oxygenated and moving, while the beneficial microorganisms in our natural bacteria products break down the debris.

Pond Talk: How have your algae blooms been this year? Better, worse or the same as last year?

Skim Dead Algae & Vegetation - The Pond Guy® Pond & Beach Rake

I have water shield. What should I use, and will it hurt the lilies I want to keep? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I have water shield. What should I use, and will it hurt the lilies I want to keep?

Q: I have water shield. What should I use, and will it hurt the lilies I want to keep?

Gordon – Spring Mills, PA

A: Water shield, scientific name Brasenia schreberi, can be a tough enemy to battle one it is established in your pond – but with some effort and the right tools this invasive aquatic plant can be controlled. Here’s what you need to know.

Water Shield Identification

Water shield, also known as Dollar Bonnet, is a floating-leaved plant that produces a small, oval pad like a water lily but without its noticeable V-shaped cutout. The leaves appear green on top and reddish-purple on the bottom and stems, and they have a distinctive gelatinous slime on their undersides. The plant also produces small, dull purple or reddish flowers that rise above the surface and consist of three to four sepals and petals.

Like other invasive aquatic plants, water shield spreads via seeds and its root system – which makes it doubly difficult to control. Beneath the surface, the long leaf stems reach the bottom where they attach to long creeping root stalks that are anchored in the mud. To control the plant, you really need to destroy the entire plant, roots and all.

Battling Water Shield

You could try to control this problem plant mechanically by cutting and yanking it with razors and rakes, but that won’t be enough to get rid of it. The plant will just regrow from its remaining roots. And if you want to attempt biological control, you’re out of luck as one doesn’t exist.

Destroying this plant means bringing out the big guns: the chemicals. Active ingredients that have been proven successful in treating water shield which include glyphosate and diquat.

Pond Logic® Shoreline Defense® Aquatic Herbicide contains glyphosate, which is a systemic killer that will work all the way down to the plant’s roots after a single use. It has no water use or temperature restrictions, so you can safely use it in ponds used for drinking water, livestock and irrigation.

Another option is Pond Logic® Ultra PondWeed Defense® Aquatic Herbicide. It’s a quick-fix solution that will kill the floating water shield foliage and tackle some other nuisance weeds in your pond. However, it may not penetrate down to the roots so you’ll need to use it repeatedly, and it has some water use restrictions associated with it.

What About the Lilies?

Both Shoreline Defense® and Ultra PondWeed Defense® should be combined with Treatment Booster™ PLUS are applied via a tank sprayer to the foliage that’s on the water surface. If you carefully spray the herbicide onto the water shield leaves on a calm day and prevent any from landing on your water lilies, they’ll be just fine!

One word of caution: Chemical control brings with it a chance of oxygen depletion caused by the decomposition of dead plant materials. If your pond is heavily infested, treat the weeds in sections, and let each section decompose for about two weeks before treating another section. Be sure to keep your aeration system running.

Pond Talk: Have you battled water shield in your pond or lake? If so, how did you win the fight?

Control Persistent Aquatic Weeds - Pond Logic® Shoreline Defense®

The ice is finally melting and there are dead cattails and phragmites everywhere. Do I need to rake them out? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The ice is finally melting and there are dead cattails and phragmites everywhere. Do I need to rake them out?

Q: The ice is finally melting and there are dead cattails and phragmites everywhere. Do I need to rake them out?

Ed – Adairsville, GA

A: What an eyesore. As the snow and ice melt, those brown, dried-up cattails and phragmites do little to enhance a landscape. They can, in fact, cause water quality and weed management problems, especially as spring approaches and those green shoots emerge from the dead growth. You need to do something about them, and here’s what we recommend.

Frosty Water

With water temperatures still on the chilly side, it’s likely too early to start treating your pond or lake with beneficial bacteria, like those found in Pond Logic® MuckAway™. Those little detritus-destroyers prefer water that’s at least 50 degrees Fahrenheit – and chances are good that it’s well below that mark (unless you’re in sunny Florida or California …). Besides, even with some oxygen-infusing aeration, it would take a long time before they would be able to decompose large cattail or phragmite stalks.

Winter Management

One option is to leave those dead weeds in the water until spring. They may attract wildlife and create an ideal home for insects, amphibians and birds – as well as small rodents and other possibly unwanted visitors that will hide out in the shoreline brush.

Right now, your best bet is to pull out your weed whacking tools and get to work.

We offer a range of cutters and rakes that’ll make the job easy. From a double-sided cutter with an 11-foot reach to a V-shaped cutter that sinks to the bottom and slices weeds at their base, these tools help you cut down those dead plants. And a rake, like one of our weed rakers, will help gather the cut stalks for easy pickup and removal.

Spring Solutions

In the spring when the water temperatures rise and the weeds start to grow again, treat them with an herbicide formulated to tackle the toughest weeds. Remember: those chemicals only work when they’re absorbed by a growing plant, so there’s no sense in using them when the cattails and phragmites are dried up and dormant.

Happy winter weeding!

Pond Talk: What features do you prefer in a weed cutter?

Cut Through Tough Weeds - The Pond Guy® 28 Inch Weed Cutter

I can’t get chemicals in my state, so how do I get rid of my weeds? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I can’t get chemicals in my state, so how do I get rid of my weeds?

Q: I can’t get chemicals in my state, so how do I get rid of my weeds?

Wayne- Ocean Shores, WA

A: Some states – like California, Washington, Maine, Connecticut, New York and New Jersey, among others – regulate the use of chemicals more so than others. If you live in one of these places, and need to control weeds or algae growth around your lake or pond, your choices are limited if you want to avoid fines and protect your local ecosystem.

But don’t worry. You still have options! Here are some ways you can manage pesky weeds and algae while keeping the regulators (and the environment) happy.

  • Mechanical Removal: Use a variety of pond tools to control the growth in your pond or lake. Cut down weeds with a Weed Cutter or Razer™ and rake them out with a weed rake, like the Jenlis Weed Raker™. If you have floating algae, you can also skim it away with a pond skimmer. This mechanical removal will take some work, but they are chemical-free ways to manage weeds and algae.
  • Limit Sunlight: Weeds and algae use sunlight to flourish, so another chemical-free way to tamp down growth is to add pond dye to the water. Available in liquid concentrate and in convenient packet formulas, Pond Dye shades your pond, preventing foliage from thriving.
  • Limit Nutrients: Plants need nutrients to grow, so adding some all natural beneficial bacteria can help. The microorganisms will eat through decomposing organics, fish waste and other plant-feeding fodder. We recommend using ClearPAC® PLUS without Algae Defense®, which contains which contains PondClear™, MuckAway™ and EcoBoost™, along with some pond dye.
  • Aerate 24/7: If you don’t already, keep your Airmax® Pond Series™ Aeration System up and running 24/7. Doing so will circulate the water column and deliver oxygen to the beneficial bacteria as they gobble through the nutrients. Aeration will also promote the growth and reproduction of those beneficial microorganisms.
  • Hire a Professional: If you’ve tried the non-chemical methods and aren’t satisfied with the result, a final option is to hire a licensed applicator in your area that has the proper permits to purchase, transport and apply chemical herbicides and algaecides.

Like them or not, rules and regulations controlling the use of chemicals are in place for a reason. Use common sense and obey the federal, state and local edicts. You have non-chemical options available, so try them out. You have nothing to lose – except a hefty fine!

Pond Talk: What are some other ways to control weeds and algae naturally?

Remove Unwanted Weeds & Muck Build Up  - The Pond Guy(r) Pond and Beach Rake

I thought I did a successful chemical treatment, but why are the weeds coming back? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I thought I did a successful chemical treatment, but why are the weeds coming back?

Q: I thought I did a successful chemical treatment, but why are the weeds coming back?

Barney – Andalusia, AL

A: Treating weeds is a tricky task. Despite dosing them with aquatic herbicides to clear your pond or lake of plant pests, they seem to grow back over and over again. It seems like a never-ending cycle!

Why does this happen?

Well, chemical treatments have their benefits and drawbacks: On one hand, they work great as a quick fix to decimate actively growing weeds. But once those plants die, they become a food source for future weeds and algae, acting as a fertilizer for the very things you’re trying to get rid of. The herbicides do nothing to prevent future growth, and so you’re left with yet another growth spurt of pond weeds, which you’ll then treat with chemical herbicides – and around you’ll go again.

So how do you break the cycle? Here’s a four-step approach that will help put an end to it.

  1. Remove the Dead Weeds: Once the weeds have browned, use a Pond & Beach Rake or PondSkim™ Debris Skimmer to remove as much dead material from the water as possible. This prevents dead plant material and muck from accumulating and fertilizing future weed growth.
  2. Be Proactive: Debris will still find its way into your pond, so add some beneficial bacteria to the water to manage the excess nutrients before they feed your weeds. The products found in the ClearPAC® PLUS Pond Care Packages – including PondClear™ and EcoBoost™ for suspended debris, and MuckAway™ for accumulated bottom-of-the-pond debris – naturally break down that organic material.
  3. Add Aeration: If you don’t have one already, install a Airmax® Pond Series™ Aeration System that’s sized for your pond or lake. By circulating and adding oxygen to the water column, the beneficial bacteria will thrive. In turn, they’ll eat through even more debris and prevent weed and algae growth.
  4. Shade and Color: Also found in the ClearPAC® Plus package is Pond Dye, another offensive tactic in your battle against aquatic weeds. Pond dye shades the water blue or black, preventing ultraviolet light from reaching the plants.

Throughout the spring and summer, weeds will grow. But with some pond management practices, you can keep those pesky plants to a minimum.

Pond Talk: How often do you treat your pond or lake for weeds?

Remove Floating Debris Quickly - The Pond Guy(r) PondSkim(t) Debris Skimmer

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