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I can’t get chemicals in my state, so how do I get rid of my weeds? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I can’t get chemicals in my state, so how do I get rid of my weeds?

Q: I can’t get chemicals in my state, so how do I get rid of my weeds?

Wayne- Ocean Shores, WA

A: Some states – like California, Washington, Maine, Connecticut, New York and New Jersey, among others – regulate the use of chemicals more so than others. If you live in one of these places, and need to control weeds or algae growth around your lake or pond, your choices are limited if you want to avoid fines and protect your local ecosystem.

But don’t worry. You still have options! Here are some ways you can manage pesky weeds and algae while keeping the regulators (and the environment) happy.

  • Mechanical Removal: Use a variety of pond tools to control the growth in your pond or lake. Cut down weeds with a Weed Cutter or Razer™ and rake them out with a weed rake, like the Jenlis Weed Raker™. If you have floating algae, you can also skim it away with a pond skimmer. This mechanical removal will take some work, but they are chemical-free ways to manage weeds and algae.
  • Limit Sunlight: Weeds and algae use sunlight to flourish, so another chemical-free way to tamp down growth is to add pond dye to the water. Available in liquid concentrate and in convenient packet formulas, Pond Dye shades your pond, preventing foliage from thriving.
  • Limit Nutrients: Plants need nutrients to grow, so adding some all natural beneficial bacteria can help. The microorganisms will eat through decomposing organics, fish waste and other plant-feeding fodder. We recommend using ClearPAC® PLUS without Algae Defense®, which contains which contains PondClear™, MuckAway™ and EcoBoost™, along with some pond dye.
  • Aerate 24/7: If you don’t already, keep your Airmax® Pond Series™ Aeration System up and running 24/7. Doing so will circulate the water column and deliver oxygen to the beneficial bacteria as they gobble through the nutrients. Aeration will also promote the growth and reproduction of those beneficial microorganisms.
  • Hire a Professional: If you’ve tried the non-chemical methods and aren’t satisfied with the result, a final option is to hire a licensed applicator in your area that has the proper permits to purchase, transport and apply chemical herbicides and algaecides.

Like them or not, rules and regulations controlling the use of chemicals are in place for a reason. Use common sense and obey the federal, state and local edicts. You have non-chemical options available, so try them out. You have nothing to lose – except a hefty fine!

Pond Talk: What are some other ways to control weeds and algae naturally?

Remove Unwanted Weeds & Muck Build Up  - The Pond Guy(r) Pond and Beach Rake

I thought I did a successful chemical treatment, but why are the weeds coming back? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I thought I did a successful chemical treatment, but why are the weeds coming back?

Q: I thought I did a successful chemical treatment, but why are the weeds coming back?

Barney – Andalusia, AL

A: Treating weeds is a tricky task. Despite dosing them with aquatic herbicides to clear your pond or lake of plant pests, they seem to grow back over and over again. It seems like a never-ending cycle!

Why does this happen?

Well, chemical treatments have their benefits and drawbacks: On one hand, they work great as a quick fix to decimate actively growing weeds. But once those plants die, they become a food source for future weeds and algae, acting as a fertilizer for the very things you’re trying to get rid of. The herbicides do nothing to prevent future growth, and so you’re left with yet another growth spurt of pond weeds, which you’ll then treat with chemical herbicides – and around you’ll go again.

So how do you break the cycle? Here’s a four-step approach that will help put an end to it.

  1. Remove the Dead Weeds: Once the weeds have browned, use a Pond & Beach Rake or PondSkim™ Debris Skimmer to remove as much dead material from the water as possible. This prevents dead plant material and muck from accumulating and fertilizing future weed growth.
  2. Be Proactive: Debris will still find its way into your pond, so add some beneficial bacteria to the water to manage the excess nutrients before they feed your weeds. The products found in the ClearPAC® PLUS Pond Care Packages – including PondClear™ and EcoBoost™ for suspended debris, and MuckAway™ for accumulated bottom-of-the-pond debris – naturally break down that organic material.
  3. Add Aeration: If you don’t have one already, install a Airmax® PondSeries™ Aeration System that’s sized for your pond or lake. By circulating and adding oxygen to the water column, the beneficial bacteria will thrive. In turn, they’ll eat through even more debris and prevent weed and algae growth.
  4. Shade and Color: Also found in the ClearPAC® Plus package is Pond Dye, another offensive tactic in your battle against aquatic weeds. Pond dye shades the water blue or black, preventing ultraviolet light from reaching the plants.

Throughout the spring and summer, weeds will grow. But with some pond management practices, you can keep those pesky plants to a minimum.

Pond Talk: How often do you treat your pond or lake for weeds?

Remove Floating Debris Quickly - The Pond Guy(r) PondSkim(t) Debris Skimmer

When treating weeds and algae, why do I have to treat in sections? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: When treating weeds and algae, why do I have to treat in sections?

Q: When treating weeds and algae, why do I have to treat in sections?

Zahn- Cedar Rapids, IA

A: It’s all about the fish. Though it’s an inconvenience to you, treating your lake or pond’s weeds and algae in sections is critical for the health of your underwater inhabitants. Those herbicides and algaecides deplete the oxygen in the pond, creating a stressful environment for the fish. Partitioning the treatments keeps oxygen levels safe while minimizing the stress.

When combating weeds and algae in the summertime, remember these three things:

  • Warm Weather = Less Oxygen: In the hot summer months, the water column will naturally hold less oxygen as it warms up.
  • Chemical Treatments = Less Oxygen: When you treat the weeds and algae with Shoreline Defense® or Algae Defense®, the oxygen levels will decline in your pond.
  • Decaying Matter = Less Oxygen:As the herbicide and algaecide start to work, the decaying matter will begin to be consumed by microorganisms, which use up the oxygen in the water.

All of these things create a stressful situation for your fish. When that happens, their immune systems could suffer, and they could develop and succumb to disease – which is something you don’t want to happen.

So while treating your pond or lake, break it into quarter sections. Then treat one section and wait 10 to 14 days to allow the water time to rebalance its oxygen level before treating the next section. Some other things you can do to improve the oxygen levels in your pond:

  • Add Aeration: Aeration, like the Pond Series™ Aeration Systems, adds oxygen to the water below the surface. The oxygen is utilized by the fish as well as the beneficial bacteria and microorganisms, which break down the muck and detritus that feed the algae and weeds.
  • Rake Away the Debris: As the herbicide and algaecide go to work killing the pond pests, take time to rake out the dead debris before it becomes algae- and weed-feeding pond muck. The Pond & Beach Rake makes the chore quick and easy.

Pond Talk: What kinds of spring and summer maintenance chores have you been doing so far this year?

Create the Perfect Pond - Airmax(r) Pond Series(t) Aeration Systems

The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Q: The temperatures are rising, so when do I start using my ClearPAC PLUS?

Sharon – Waynesboro, GA

A: Inside your ClearPAC® PLUS box, you’ll find everything you need to keep your lake clean and clear this spring and summer. The five components, when used as directed, address the root of the most common pond problems by tackling excess nutrients and shielding the water from algae-feeding sunlight.
When should you start using ClearPAC® PLUS? It all depends on your water temperature. Let’s take a closer look at when and how to best use the products in your super-pack.

  • Pond Dye: As soon as the ice melts on your pond or lake, add your Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye. The dye is not temperature-sensitive so it can be used even when water temps are too cold for beneficial bacteria products. Pond Dye does more than color your water and add to your landscape’s aesthetic; it also shades it from sunlight, which can kick-start algae blooms as the mercury rises.
  • PondClear™ and MuckAway™: When water temperatures rise to a consistent 50°F, you can start using the beneficial bacteria found in PondClear™ and MuckAway™ to break down nutrients suspended in your water column and muck on the bottom of your pond. These products can be used at the same time as your Pond Dye and EcoBoost™.
  • EcoBoost™: This bacteria booster that has no temperature restrictions, so it can be used year-round to bind phosphates that find their way into your pond or lake. You can use EcoBoost™ throughout the spring to give you a head start on pond season.
  • Algae Defense® : To be used only as needed, this algae-destroyer treats troublesome floating filamentous algae, bottom growing chara and the planktonic algae when it’s green and growing. Use Algae Defense® when the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60°F. Don’t use Algae Defense® if you keep koi or trout in your lake.

After treating your pond with ClearPAC® PLUS, don’t forget to remove dead algae and debris with your Pond & Beach Rake. Doing so will remove the decaying vegetation and prevent them from feeding the algae—which will ultimately help your Pond Dye, PondClear™, MuckAway™, EcoBoost™ and Algae Defense® work even better!

Pond Talk: Has spring sprung in your area of the country?

Keep Your Pond Clean and Clear - Pond Logic(r) ClearPAC® PLUS

Do pond weeds stop growing during the winter months? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Do pond weeds stop growing during the winter months?

Q: Do pond weeds stop growing during the winter months?

Allen – Marcola, OR

A: Unfortunately, it’s tough to give you a definitive answer. The growth pattern of aquatic weeds and algae really depend on where a particular pond or lake is located. Weed growth in a Florida pond, for instance, will be different from weed growth in a Minnesota pond!

In general, however, you can expect to see different pond weeds pop up at different times of year based on environmental temperature, just like the weeds in your lawn. If your pond or lake freezes over, the perennial weeds will typically die back in the winter and re-emerge in the spring. Some plants, however, will continue to grow throughout the cold season, though at a much slower rate than you’d see in the warmer summer months.

Trouble surfaces when water temperatures drop to the point where your algaecides and herbicides become ineffective – but the weeds continue to grow. Algae Defense®, for example, stops working when the water is below 60° Fahrenheit, and the beneficial bacteria in PondClear™ slow down to almost a stop when temps fall below 50°F.

So what can you do?

When the chemicals and bacteria are no longer working for the winter, it’s time to turn to Pond Logic® Pond Dye. An effective year-round treatment, Pond Dye shades the water and reduces the amount of sunlight reaching the weeds and algae growing at the bottom of your lake. Less sunlight means fewer weeds, regardless of the temperature or time of year.

Pond Logic® Pond Dye comes in two formulations: Easy-to-use packets and quarts of concentrated liquid. To use the packets, which come in Nature’s Blue™ and Black DyeMond™, simply toss several in water at various locations around your pond or lake. The packet will dissolve and the dye will disperse throughout the water. To use the concentrated liquid, which comes in Nature’s Blue™, Twilight Blue™ and Black DyeMond™, pour the dye in several spots along the pond’s edge. There’s no mixing required.

If wintertime weeds are taking over your pond, consider adding Pond Dye. Not only will it shade your water and hinder weed growth, but it will also add to the aesthetics of your landscape.

Pond Talk: Do you battle weed growth year-round where you live?

Shade and Protect Your Pond Year Round - Pond Logic® Pond Dye Packets

After a really warm day, I have algae floating on my pond. How do I control it? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: After a really warm day, I have algae floating on my pond. How do I control it?

Q: After a really warm day, I have algae floating on my pond. How do I control it?

Steve – Grand Rapids, MI

A: Plants in your vegetable garden love the warm sunshine—and so do the plants in your pond or lake, including algae. Warm temperatures and bright sunshine trigger green growth, so it’s critical to keep floating and submerged algae under control before it grows out of control.

Here’s what we recommend:

1. Treat the Growth

First, use an algaecide to kill the green stuff. You can treat floating algae with a fast-acting liquid spray like Pond Logic® Algae Defense® Algaecide with Treatment Booster™ PLUS, which treats algae floating around the perimeter of your pond. Simply spray it on with a pressurized sprayer to combat floating and bottom-growing algae.

Submerged algae can be treated with sinking granular products, such as Cutrine®-Plus Granular Algaecide. It works well for algae submerged deep in your pond or lake, such as Chara. It’s best distributed on a calm day via a granular spreader in the morning before mats form.

2. Remove the Dead Algae

Once the algae is dead, you should remove it. Why? Because that decomposing foliage turns into pond muck, which feeds future algae blooms throughout the season. Use a pond skimmer, like The Pond Guy® PondSkim™ Debris Skimmer, or a lake rake, like Pond Logic® Pond & Beach Rake, to prevent that muck from accumulating.

3. Add Beneficial Bacteria

Three days after you’ve used algaecides, treat your pond with PondClear™. It contains beneficial bacteria that gobbles through the organic material that’s suspended in the water column. The result is a lake filled with clean, clear, odor-free water—and a healthy ecosystem for your game fish and other pond inhabitants.

4. Shade Water with Pond Dye

Finally, be sure to add blue or black pond dye, like Pond Logic® Pond Dye, to your lake throughout the spring and summer. By reducing the amount of sunlight that shines through the water and stimulates green growth, you will ultimately reduce the amount of algae.

Pond Talk: What lakeside recreational activities do you have planned this summer?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS

Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Jeremy – Clinton, IA

A: It sure doesn’t take much for algae to grow out of control! Combine warm sunshine with some algae-loving nutrients and, before long, you’ll have a pond full of pea soup. When it’s thick and dense, those tiny plants can then suck all the oxygen from the water, leaving your fish gasping for air. Plus, it looks bad and can cause some major stink.

For the health of your fish and your lake, you must regain control. Here’s a two-pronged approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over.

TREAT THE GROWTH

First, you need to get rid of the algae blooms. For floating algae and chara that’s less than 3 feet deep, use Algae Defense®. The aquatic algaecide comes in a fast-acting liquid formula that can be directly applied to your lake with a pressurized sprayer. If you’re dealing with chara that’s deeper than 3 feet, use Cutrine®-Plus. Its granular formula sinks to the bottom of your lake and destroys the algae.

Once the algaecides start working to kill the blooms, don’t forget to remove dead algae from the pond with a tool like the Pond Rake. If you leave the dead foliage in the lake, will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

TREAT THE SOURCE

Now that you’ve got the algae under control, it’s time to get proactive and prevent its future growth. Begin by adding PondClear™ & MuckAway™. These products contain beneficial bacteria that gobble through excess nutrients like suspended organic waste and muck in your pond. The result: Clean and clear water with no noxious odors.

Next, shade the water with pond dye. By preventing the sun’s rays from penetrating the water, you’ll starve the algae of sunlight, which it needs to thrive.

ONE-STOP SHOPPING

Looking for an easy solution? Check out the ClearPAC® PLUS. This all-in-one algae destroyer contains everything you’ll need to kill the algae and prevent future growth. It contains algaecide, beneficial bacteria and pond dye to fight algae and suspended debris all season long.

Pond Talk: How do you prevent excess nutrients from entering your pond or lake?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS Combo

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