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I hear about being proactive, but what are PondClear™ and MuckAway™, and how does it help my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I hear about being proactive, but what are PondClear™ and MuckAway™, and how does it help my pond?

Q: I hear about being proactive, but what are PondClear™ and MuckAway™, and how does it help my pond?

Ed – Cambridge, NY

A: Your agricultural pond or fish-filled lake faces an unseen threat: an inorganic chemical called phosphate. Found in many fertilizers used in farming applications, phosphates do wonders for helping plants to grow—but when they leech into your pond or lake after a heavy rain, they can fuel algae blooms that can ultimately do harm to your fish population, not to mention being unsightly and malodorous.

Though it may be difficult to prevent those phosphates from finding their way into your water, you can take a proactive approach to minimize the algae growth and protect your fish. This involves binding and removing the phosphates, cleaning up the water column and breaking down accumulated muck.

And that’s where EcoBoost™, PondClear™ and MuckAway™ come into play. They’re the one-two-three punch your pond needs to stay healthy.

Bind the Phosphates

EcoBoost™, which is found in ClearPAC® PLUS, grabs hold of the algae-stimulating phosphates and other suspended organics in your pond, allowing the beneficial bacteria in PondClear™ and MuckAway™ to grow and gobble through excess nutrients in the water. EcoBoost contains more than 80 trace minerals to promote fish health and fast growth, as well as helping to create clean and clear water that your finned friends will appreciate!

Clean the Water

PondClear™ is designed to clean the water from the top down. It contains beneficial bacteria that devour excess nutrients that are suspended in the water, which feed algae. The natural bacteria digest the organic debris, leaving behind water that’s clean and clear while promoting a healthy ecosystem for your lake’s inhabitants.

Remove the Muck

MuckAway™ cleans the water from the bottom up. The pellets sink to the bottom of your pond and release beneficial bacteria that eat away at any accumulated pond muck. The result is improved water clarity and reduced odor. With regular use, MuckAway™ can break down up to 5 inches of muck per year—and that means less nutrients to feed algae blooms.

Keep in mind that these products will take some time to kick in. It took a long time for the muck and debris to collect in your pond or lake, and so it won’t disappear overnight. Be patient and follow the dosage schedule, and you’ll ultimately be pleased with the results.

Pond Talk: What algae-prevention strategy do you follow?

Remove Excess Nutrients & Noxious Odros - Pond Logic® PondClear™

Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Q: Now that temperatures are getting warmer, algae keeps growing. How do I stop algae from taking over?

Jeremy – Clinton, IA

A: It sure doesn’t take much for algae to grow out of control! Combine warm sunshine with some algae-loving nutrients and, before long, you’ll have a pond full of pea soup. When it’s thick and dense, those tiny plants can then suck all the oxygen from the water, leaving your fish gasping for air. Plus, it looks bad and can cause some major stink.

For the health of your fish and your lake, you must regain control. Here’s a two-pronged approach that works to eliminate the green stuff and prevent it from taking over.

TREAT THE GROWTH

First, you need to get rid of the algae blooms. For floating algae and chara that’s less than 3 feet deep, use Algae Defense®. The aquatic algaecide comes in a fast-acting liquid formula that can be directly applied to your lake with a pressurized sprayer. If you’re dealing with chara that’s deeper than 3 feet, use Cutrine®-Plus. Its granular formula sinks to the bottom of your lake and destroys the algae.

Once the algaecides start working to kill the blooms, don’t forget to remove dead algae from the pond with a tool like the Pond Rake. If you leave the dead foliage in the lake, will start to break down and become nutrients—or algae food—for new blooms. It’s a vicious cycle!

TREAT THE SOURCE

Now that you’ve got the algae under control, it’s time to get proactive and prevent its future growth. Begin by adding PondClear™ & MuckAway™. These products contain beneficial bacteria that gobble through excess nutrients like suspended organic waste and muck in your pond. The result: Clean and clear water with no noxious odors.

Next, shade the water with pond dye. By preventing the sun’s rays from penetrating the water, you’ll starve the algae of sunlight, which it needs to thrive.

ONE-STOP SHOPPING

Looking for an easy solution? Check out the ClearPAC® PLUS. This all-in-one algae destroyer contains everything you’ll need to kill the algae and prevent future growth. It contains algaecide, beneficial bacteria and pond dye to fight algae and suspended debris all season long.

Pond Talk: How do you prevent excess nutrients from entering your pond or lake?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS Combo

When can I start treating the floating algae in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

When can I start treating the floating algae in my pond?

Q: When can I start treating the floating algae in my pond?

Alex – East Earl, PA

A: The magic number you’re looking for is 60—a water temperature of 60° Fahrenheit, that is. Chemicals that treat algae aren’t very effective at temperatures below that, and so the time to start attacking the green growth is when your underwater thermometer reads higher than 60°.

Once your lake water is warm enough, you can start treating floating algae with a chemical of choice depending on your pond’s situation:

  • If You Have Submerged Algae: Granular products, such as Applied Biochemists Cutrine®-Plus Granular Algaecide, work well for algae submerged deep in your pond or lake, such as Chara. It’s best distributed on a calm day via a granular spreader in the morning before mats form.
  • If You Have Surface or Perimeter Algae: Fast-acting liquid spray, such as Pond Logic® Algae Defense® Algaecide with Treatment Booster™ PLUS, effectively treats algae floating around the perimeter of your pond. Simply spray it on with a pressurized sprayer to combat floating and bottom-growing algae.

Once the algae is dead, remove it as soon as possible with a pond skimmer, such as The Pond Guy® PondSkim™ Debris Skimmer, or a lake rake, like Pond Logic® Pond Rake & Weed Cutter. By removing the dead growth, you prevent the organic muck material from accumulating along the pond bottom and feeding future algae blooms throughout the season.

If water temps are below 60, practice some patience. You’ll have to wait until your lake’s water warms before you can battle the green menace with chemicals. If your algae situation is already excessive, however, get out your rake and start removing some of those mats until you can nuke them with chemicals.

Pond Talk: How much algae growth have you had so far this year?

Eliminate Algae Quickly - Pond Logic® Algae Defense® & Treatment Booster™ PLUS

Is it too cold to treat my pond with the ClearPAC® PLUS? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

: Is it too cold to treat my pond with the ClearPAC® PLUS?

Q: Is it too cold to treat my pond with the ClearPAC® PLUS?

Steve – Denham Springs, LA

A: The Pond Logic® ClearPAC® and ClearPAC® PLUS combine PondClear™, Algae Defense®, EcoBoost™ and Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye to combat algae and suspended debris and beautify your lake or pond. Some components of this super-pack have temperature limitations while others can be used year-round. Let’s take a closer look at each one.

PondClear™ (and MuckAway™)

Beneficial bacteria that break down muck and suspended debris, such as those found in PondClear™ (and MuckAway™ in ClearPAC® PLUS), can be used when water temperatures rise to more than 50° Fahrenheit or so. Though that temperature is not a definitive starting point, the bacteria will become more effective as the temperatures rise. Bottom line: When your underwater thermometer tops 50°, it’s time to start treating your pond or lake with ClearPAC®.

Algae Defense®

This algae-destroyer can be used to treat troublesome floating filamentous algae, bottom growing chara or the planktonic algae as long as it’s green and growing, and the water temperature in your pond or lake is above 60° Fahrenheit.

EcoBoost™

EcoBoost™, which is a bacteria booster rather than an actual bacteria, has no temperature restrictions so it can be used year-round to bind phosphates that find their way into your pond or lake. You can use EcoBoost™ throughout the spring to give you a head start on pond season.

Pond Dye

The final ingredient in the Pond Logic® ClearPAC®, Nature’s Blue™ Pond Dye, is not temperature-sensitive, so it can be used year-round to give your pond or lake that aesthetic appeal throughout the winter months. And if spring storms are preventing you from standing next to your pond pouring in a quart of dye, try Pond Dye Packets—all you do is toss the water-soluble packet into the water and head back to your warm and toasty home!

Pond Talk: What changes do you have planned for your fish pond or lake this year?

Eliminate The Guesswork - Pond Logic® ClearPAC® PLUS

Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond?

Q: Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond?

Bill – Ashville, OH

A: Barley straw and ponds have some great chemistry. As a barley straw bale breaks down in water, it produces and releases many chemical compounds—and one of them may actually control algae growth.

How? Scientists from the Ohio State University Extension report that the compound interferes with and prevents the new growth of algae cells. As the old algae cells naturally die off, few new algae cells are produced—thereby controlling the overall algae population.

Sounds like a perfect solution for your 1/2 acre lake, right?

Well, barley straw will technically work to control algae in all that water—but you’ll need a ton of barley to accomplish it! More precisely, you’ll need as much as 112 pounds per 1/2 acre of surface area, according to OSU experts.

That’s great if you live next to a barley field, but that’s not a reality for most of us …

And accessibility to all those pounds of straw isn’t the only challenge. The bales are also tough to handle. In a small 1,000-gallon pond, small bales of barley straw can be used and tucked away in the filter, out of view. But in a sizable pond or lake, large bales are cumbersome to haul and position.

Not only that, but they also need to be broken apart to allow the right amount of oxygen in the middle of the bale so it properly decomposes, which means all that loose material will float to the pond’s surface and really make a mess of things.

Rather than wrangle all that barley straw, try an Airmax® Aeration System instead coupled with a beneficial bacteria product, like MuckAway. The aeration system will circulate the pond water, allowing the bacteria to break down all the muck.

Low amounts of nutrients in the pond means less food for plants and weeds—and that’s some chemistry every lake owner should understand.

Pond Talk: Do you prefer aeration and beneficial bacteria over barley straw? If so, why?

Reduce Mucky Pond Bottoms - Pond Logic® MuckAway®

Setting Pond Resolutions

Setting Pond Resolutions

Setting Pond Resolutions

It’s that time of year—the season when New Year revelers set lofty self-improvement goals and strive to stick to them. Unfortunately, many of these resolutions are long forgotten after a few short weeks. Sound familiar? (I don’t know about you, but my running shoes are still hidden away in the closet!)

Well, set those aspirations aside. Let’s refocus your resolution energy on improving your lake, pond or water garden instead. Here’s how to formulate some attainable goals—and actually reach them—when spring arrives.

1. Realistic Evaluation

First of all, realistically assess the situation in your pond and your experiences with it over the past year. What problems or challenges did you face? Did you have an out-of-control algae problem last spring? A fish population boom (or bust)? Wild water temperature fluctuations? Are you sick of looking at all the cattails?

As you’re brainstorming, make a list of these potential pond projects. Be as detailed as possible about what the problems were and the circumstances surrounding them.

2. Pick your Problem

With your list in hand, identify the problem (or problems) you’d like to fix—but pick only one or two to tackle. Then, research the topic(s) to get to the root of the situation and find out what’s causing the problem.

For instance, if you had crazy algae blooms last spring, perhaps you have excess nutrients in the water that need to be removed with a filter or broken down by beneficial bacterial. If a particular fish species is exploding in your lake, maybe you need to add some predator fish to keep the numbers in check. If your water temperatures are all over the place, aerating it could help. And if the cattails have taken over, it could be time to do some weed whacking.

3. Formulate a Plan

Next, develop a doable plan—complete with easily attainable goals so you don’t get burned out or overwhelmed. Think manageable benchmarks rather than big-picture dreams.

Let’s take on algae blooms. Your action plan would include removing dead vegetation with a pond rake and cutter; adding beneficial bacteria, such as DefensePAC® (water gardens) or ClearPAC® (pond and lake), to break down detritus and subsurface nutrients; adding or cleaning your mechanical filtration system; and setting up an aeration system, like an Airmax Pond Aeration System. These are all attainable goals that don’t take too much effort when they’re laid out in such a way.

4. Act on It!

Finally, take action before it’s too late. No pressure here—but time is of the essence, particularly with pond resolutions. Small problems, like the occasional algae bloom, can quickly become big problems and may even threaten the health of your lake or pond inhabitants.

Why wait? Before the weather warms, get a jump start to the season by identifying problems, developing action plans, and readying the tools you’ll need. Then you’ll be able to get a hold of these issues before they’re in full swing so you can enjoy the season!

Pond Talk: What are your pond resolutions for the New Year?

5 Steps to Clear Water - Pond Logic® DefensePAC®

I’ve inherited an overgrown pond. How can I whip it back into shape? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

I’ve inherited an overgrown pond. How can I whip it back into shape?

Q: I’ve inherited an overgrown pond. How can I whip it back into shape?

Kent – Maurice, LA

A: Congratulations! You just purchased your dream property with rolling fields, lush green trees and a gorgeous lake or pond – or at least that’s how you remembered it when you signed the loan documents.

But once you move in and take a closer look at the situation, you realize that gorgeous lake is an overgrown nightmare. Believe it or not, this is not an uncommon scenario. Many new land owners purchase property with a lake or a pond only to discover it hasn’t been well maintained.

Of course, you want to reclaim that overgrown pond and turn it into a useable recreation or livestock watering area, but where do you begin? Check out these six tips for whipping your lake back into shape.

1. Evaluate the Situation

Your first task is to evaluate the pond itself and record what you find. What is its size, shape and depth? Is there an abundance of weeds? Can you find an aeration system? Are there fish living in the pond? Jot down as many details as you can, because they will be important when deciding what kinds of product to use to regain control of your lake. The more you know, the better.

2. Install Aeration

Next, install an aeration system. Aeration, which circulates oxygen throughout the water column, will go a long way toward improving the health of your pond while you regain control of the habitat and work to maintain it. Plus, your fish and the natural bacteria living in the pond rely on the mechanical water turnover to replenish the oxygen supply and remove harmful gasses like ammonia.

3. Identify Weeds and Treat Them

What weeds are growing in your pond? To help you identify the greenery and determine whether they’re beneficial plants or nuisances, check out The Pond Guy® weed control guide. Once you have the plants ID’d, you can then select the proper chemicals and the right amount to handle the job. Start treating the weeds with a suitable algaecide or herbicide once your aeration system is well established.

4. Rake Out Dead Debris

Yes, it seems like a tough job, but you will need to rake out and remove dead debris, like fallen leaves, cattails and other decomposing organic materials with a weed cutter and rake, like the Pond Logic® Pond Rake and Weed Cutter. The hard work will pay off in the long run. The more large debris you remove, the less work your muck-destroying beneficial bacteria and aeration system will need to do – and the faster your pond will get back into tip-top shape.

5. Maintain, Maintain, Maintain

To keep your pond or lake on the fast track to being clean, clear and usable, you must keep up on the maintenance chores. Remove the years of pond muck buildup with natural bacteria or phosphate binder, like those found in Pond Logic® ClearPAC® PLUS pond care package. Continue to remove dead and decomposing debris as your herbicides kill nuisance weeds. Add pond dye for aesthetic appeal and to slow algae growth. Now that you have the overgrown pond under control, don’t let it get away from you!

6. Be Patient and Persistent

Despite your efforts, it will take time to reclaim your pond or lake – so be realistic about your expectations. Consider the pond’s age and the amount of debris it has accumulated over the years. If it took a decade or more for the pond to look it way it did, it will take more than one afternoon of hard work to make it pristine again! Be patient and persistent. You’ll have that gorgeous pond in no time.

Pond Talk: If you’ve purchased property with a pond or lake, what kind of condition was it in and what did you do to make it usable?

Airmax Aeration Systems - Reduce 90 Percent of Nutrients in 90 Days

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