• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

What can I do to get rid of mosquitoes near my pond?| Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: What can I do to get rid of mosquitoes near my pond?

Q: What can I do to get rid of mosquitoes near my pond?

Richard – Benkelman, NE

A: It’s twilight. You’re relaxing pond side, enjoying a cold beverage and conversation with your pals, when the buzzing and biting starts. The mosquitoes have crashed your party, and they send you scurrying for insect repellent, long sleeves and – at the peak of swarm season – the safety of the indoors.

Mosquitoes are not fun. They feed on blood, leave behind itchy welts and, in some cases, transmit dangerous diseases like malaria, dengue, yellow fever, West Nile virus, dog heartworm and equine encephalitis. So how do you control the evil little vampires?

Clean House

Your first course of action is to destroy their home. Adult mosquitoes live among the debris surrounding your pond, so pull out your Weed Cutter or Pond & Beach Rake and cut down and rake out the dead plants, overgrowth and other potential hiding spots – at least in the area where you hang out most often.

Stop Stagnant Water

A female mosquito prefers to lay her eggs in stagnant water that’s full of algae, plankton, fungi and bacteria, so your next plan of attack should be to churn the water with an Airmax® Aeration System near the area where you sit. The waves will make her think twice about calling that part of your pond home.

Bring In the Troops

If you don’t already have a fish population living in your lake, consider adding some mosquito fish, which are small fish that gobble the mosquito larvae. The American Mosquito Control Association recommends adding predacious minnows or native fish to lakes and ponds for biological control of the insects.

Use Mosquito Dunks

If you find you’re still having problems with the vampire bugs, try some Summit® Mosquito Bits® & Dunks®. These handy-dandy little disks and crumbles contain Bt-israelensis (Bt-i), a specially formulated biological pesticide designed to mosquito larvae. You simply toss them in your pond or lake and they’ll provide relief for up to 30 days. Plus, they’re safe for use around wildlife, pets and humans.

Don’t put away the insect repellent because, unfortunately, mosquitoes are part of life with a lake or pond. But you can keep the population of those irritating bloodsuckers down with aeration, physical control, biological control and, if necessary, chemical control so you can enjoy relaxing evenings without being chased inside.

Pond Talk: How do you manage mosquitoes by your pond or lake?

Eradicate Mosquitoes for 30 Days - Summit® Mosquito Bits® & Dunks®

How do I know how many gallons are in my pond?| Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: How do I know how many gallons are in my pond?

Q: How do I know how many gallons are in my pond?

Jolene – New Rochelle, NY

A: Gallons matter. Knowing how much water your pond holds will help you determine the size of aeration and filtration systems you need. It will also help you properly dose your pond with commonly used pond products and determine how many fish your pond can house.

So how do you calculate this all-important figure? Put on your thinking cap, because we’re revisiting some high school geometry.

Rectangular Ponds

The easiest ponds to measure are those that resemble a rectangle. If you’ll recall from geometry class, you can calculate a rectangle’s volume by multiplying its length by its width by its height, so L x W x H.

First, to get your length and width, measure your pond at its longest point and its widest point. Figuring out its depth is a bit trickier, particularly if you have plant shelves or if the pond has a slope. If it is the same depth throughout, use that number in your formula. If you have a plant shelf or the depth varies, measure the maximum depth and cut it in half to create an average depth. For instance, let’s say the pond is four feet at its deepest but has some shallow areas for plants. Use half of that depth, or two feet, for your formula.

So let’s put this in real terms: If your pond is 15 feet long by 10 feet wide by 2 feet deep, your pond’s volume is 300 cubic feet. One cubic foot holds 7.48 gallons of water, so multiply 300 by 7.48 to get your total – which equals 2,244 gallons.

Circular Ponds

If your pond is round or oval, you’ll start by using the formula to find the surface area of a circle – which is Pi x Radius2 , or 3.14 x R x R. The radius of your pond is half the distance across, so if your pond is a 10 foot circle, the radius is 5 feet. Your formula will look like this: 3.14 x 5 x 5 = 78.5.

Next, figure out your pond’s depth, just like we did with the rectangular pond. If it’s 4 feet deep with plant shelves and sloped sides, use 2 feet. Then multiply that number by your surface area: 78.5 x 2 = 157 cubic feet.

Finally, convert that number into gallons. One cubic foot holds 7.48 gallons of water, so 157 x 7.48 = 1,174 gallons.

Irregular Shaped Ponds

The more irregular your pond’s shape, the less accurate your measurement will become – but it’s OK. In most cases, you don’t need to pinpoint its volume to the exact gallon. Use whichever formula best resembles your pond’s shape. For instance, if your pond is kidney shaped, use the rectangle formula and remember that the final figure will be slightly higher.

Playing with the Numbers

With your newfound numbers, head over to The Pond Guy’s® online calculator where you can plug in those figures and see how many boulders you need, how many fish your pond can hold, what pump size you need and more.

Now aren’t you glad you paid attention in geometry class?

Pond Talk: What kinds of improvements have you made to your pond or backyard this summer?

5 Easy Steps to Clear Pond Water - Pond Logic (r) DefensePAC 9r)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 142 other followers