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The string algae seems to grow in just a few hours in my stream. What can I do? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: The string algae seems to grow in just a few hours in my stream. What can I do?

Q: The string algae seems to grow in just a few hours in my stream. What can I do?

Edith – Marion, IN

A: String algae. It seems to just grow and grow, leaving a tangled mess of green slimy stuff in your stream and water garden. Like other types of algae, string algae thrives on sunlight and excess nutrients like fish waste and decomposing organic matter in the water. If you want to get rid of it, check out this five-step plan designed to get your string algae problem under control.

  • Add Plants: Water lilies, water hyacinth, water lettuce and other floating aquatic plants look much nicer than algae, right? These ornamental plants will compete for the food source algae uses for growth, so plant away! A simple rule of thumb is to have 60 percent of your pond covered with submerged, floating and marginal plants.
  • Ration Fish Food: Those pellets and sticks are necessary to feed your finned friends, but keep in mind that fish food adds nutrients to the water in two ways: as wasted food that the fish don’t eat, and as waste after the fish digest it. Monitor how much your fish actually eat and cut back if possible.
  • Pump Up Filtration: If your filtration system isn’t powerful enough to handle your pond’s total fish load, you’ll wind up with burgeoning algae growth and, in worst-case scenarios, lethal levels of ammonia – neither of which you want. Many filters on the market are rated for ponds containing no fish or minimal fish, so get a filter that is rated for at least two times the water volume of your pond.
  • Turn Up Aeration: Beneficial bacteria, like those found in the DefensePAC®, naturally break down fish waste, but they need oxygen to thrive and reproduce. By adding a PondAir™ Aeration System, you’ll boost the oxygen in the water, increase your bacteria levels and reduce the nutrient load, thereby reducing algae growth.
  • Use Oxy-Lift™ Defense®: As needed throughout the season, use Oxy-Lift™ Defense® to lift string algae from waterfalls, streams and rocks. Simply shut down your waterfall, sprinkle the powder directly onto debris-covered areas and watch it instantly start foaming. In 24 hours, it will have removed the algae. Be sure to pull out any debris with a pond net.

String algae may seem like a never-ending battle, but you can manage it with these tried-and-true methods. Good luck!

Pond Talk: How often do you need to scrub string algae from your waterfall or stream?

Lift Debris From Waterfalls Instantly - Pond Logic (r) Oxy-Lift(t) Defense (r)

My grandkids hate going into the water by our beach because of the muck. What can I do to get rid of it?– Ponds & Lakes Q & A

Q: My grandkids hate going into the water by our beach because of the muck. What can I do to get rid of it?

Q: My grandkids hate going into the water by our beach because of the muck. What can I do to get rid of it?

Gerhard – Dallas, TX

A: There are few things nastier than stepping into a cool, refreshing lake on a hot summer day – only to feel that slimy goo squish between your toes and suction off your favorite flip-flops.

Pond muck is gross, it’s smelly and it’s no fun. That yucky muck is made up of fish waste, decaying plants and other organic materials that accumulate at the bottom of your pond. Over time, the sludge can build to be inches or more thick. Don’t worry: Get rid of it with a one-two punch of beneficial bacteria and aeration.

Bacteria to the Rescue

Microorganisms are busy little critters. Billions of beneficial bacteria already live in your pond and work hard to break down pond muck, but it sounds like they’re overworked and outnumbered. You can boost their numbers with regular doses of MuckAway™. The pelleted product sinks to the bottom – where you need it most – and starts working to gobble through the muck. MuckAway™ works well in areas that experience high water flow, like canals, beaches and lakefront property.

When applied consistently once every two weeks when water temperatures are above 50º F and used with a bottom-diffused aeration system, MuckAway™ can break down up to 5 inches of pond muck per year. That’s some serious sludge digestion! It may not solve your grandkids’ yucky muck dilemma this year, but you’ll definitely see an improvement by this time next year.

Circulate and Aerate

Like every living creature on earth, the beneficial bacteria in your lake needs oxygen to thrive, and that’s where aeration and circulation come into play.

Aeration prevents thermocline, which is when the water column stagnates and forms layers. The upper portion of the body of water that’s exposed to air contains oxygen while the deeper areas lack oxygen – which is where your beneficial bacteria live (or are struggling to survive!). Implementing an Airmax® Aeration System will circulate the contents of your pond and infuse the entire water column with oxygen. This influx in oxygen helps beneficial bacteria flourish and feed on all that accumulated organic debris.

Short-Term Solution

For your grandkids’ enjoyment on the beach this summer, you can remove some of the pond muck with a Pond & Beach Rake and a bucket or wheelbarrow. But definitely make plans to treat your beach area with MuckAway™ and install an aeration system so you’re all ready for fun in the sun next year.

Pond Talk: If you’ve manually removed muck from your pond or lake, what do you do with it?

Naturally Eliminate Pond Muck - Pond Logic® MuckAway™

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