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I had a bad duckweed problem last year. How do I prevent it this year? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: I had a bad duckweed problem last year. How do I prevent it this year?

Q: I had a bad duckweed problem last year. How do I prevent it this year?

Alex – Alvada,OH

A: As you know, Duckweed is a persistent pond pest. Dense colonies of these prolific plants can completely cover the surface of a lake or fish pond, causing dissolved oxygen depletions and fish kills. These tiny invaders need to be managed before they take over.

ID Duckweed

Transported by waterfowl, Duckweed is a very small, light green, free-floating plant that sports a single hair-like root and three 1/16- to 1/8-inch long leaves, or fronds, that resemble a four-leaf clover. It tends to grow in dense colonies in quiet water that’s undisturbed by waves, and it’s often mistaken for algae.

Though Duckweed colonies can provide a habitat for microscopic critters and forage for hungry ducks, the plant can wipe out oxygen in the water if it grows to cover a lake’s or pond’s surface. That could compromise your fishes’ health and cut off sunlight to underwater plants.

Plant Pest Control

Because Duckweed is such a small plant that spreads very quickly, it can be difficult to control – and so it’s critical to treat your pond or lake early in the spring when the growth first appears.

To manage these aquatic bad guys, you’ll need an herbicide. We recommend Sonar A.S., a weed killer that provides season-long control against unwanted plants like Duckweed. It’s designed for water bodies that have no water outflow, as it can take 30 to 60 days to control established weed growth and up to 90 days for full protection of your pond.

Sonar A.S. degrades quickly in sunlight, and so you must add Pond Dye at the time of treatment. The dye will shade the water and allow the herbicide to work effectively.

Short-Term Solution

If you want to remove the Duckweed for a short period of time but your pond or lake has an outflow that prevents you from using Sonar A.S., you can remove the tiny plants with the Pond Skim. The floating tool, which is 5 feet wide, collects surface debris when dragged across the water.

Pond Talk: How do you remove duckweed from your farm pond or lake?

One Treatment for the Entire Season - Sonar™ Fluridone Aquatic Herbicide

I have a leak in my liner. How do I repair it? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: I have a leak in my liner. How do I repair it?

Q: I have a leak in my liner. How do I repair it?

Catherine – Ballwin, MO

A: Dropping water levels and wet patches appearing around your pond indicate one thing: a leaky liner. Don’t worry. It doesn’t mean you need to rebuild your water garden from the ground up. You just have to patch the leak.

Your repair process starts with determining the size of the leak. Smaller holes can simply be patched; larger punctures or multiple tears need a bit more attention. Here’s what we recommend based on the leak size.

For Smaller Holes …

If you have a small hole in your liner that’s 5 inches or less, you can use the EPDM Pond Liner Patch Kit. It contains everything you’ll need to fix minor tears or holes, including a EPDM rubber patch, solvent wipe, a scrub sponge, seam roller and pair of disposable gloves.

To begin, make sure the surface is both clean and dry. If necessary, relocate your fish in a holding tank while prepping the liner and performing your repair. After the patch is in place, you can top off your pond’s water level, and acclimate and return your fish to their home.

For Tears or Punctures …

To repair smaller tears or punctures without draining your pond, you can use Underwater Pond Sealer. Remember, however, that it has to be beaded on, not smeared on, because it’s a sealer, not an adhesive. When used as directed, it’ll start to be tacky in two to three hours, and fully cured in 48 hours. The sealer performs best in water that’s 60° Fahrenheit.

For best results, clean the surface and make sure it’s free of grease and algae. If necessary, relocate your fish in a holding tank while allowing the repaired area to fully cure.

Then place sealer directly onto the surface you wish to bond/seal. Put two 5mm diameter beads of sealer 100mm apart on the overlap. Gently run your fingers over the line to make sure the sealer has connected both pieces of liner. Do not press it flat, and don’t be tempted to pull it apart to see if it has stuck! Allow the sealer to fully cure before returning your fish to the pond.

For Multiple Tears or Large Punctures …

Larger punctures of multiple tears will require some work. You’ll need to put your fish in a holding tank, drain the pond and adhere a new piece of liner to the existing one. Here’s what you’ll need and how the process should go:

First, you’ll need to purchase a liner seaming kit, a new piece of liner and have some protective gloves on hand. After you’ve repaired the tears and ensured that the adhesive had done its job, refill your pond, and acclimate and return your fish to their home.

Good luck repairing your leaky liner!

Pond Talk: Have you ever had to repair your leaky liner? Tell us about your experience!

Repair Leaky Liners Without Draining Pond - Gold Label Pond & Aquarium Sealer

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