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Will the snails I added last year still be in my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Will the snails I added last year still be in my pond?

Q: Will the snails I added last year still be in my pond?

Phoebe – Amherst, NH

A: Snails are a pond keeper’s best friend – especially when it comes to gobbling through algae.

The type that you probably have in your backyard water garden is the Japanese Trapdoor Snail. They get their name from their fancy shells, which have a hinged fingernail-like plate that allows them to seal the shell’s opening, providing protection from drought and predators.

Cold-Weather Friendly
These little guys are hardy enough to weather cold temperatures, like the ones we had all winter. Unlike other aquatic snails, Japanese Trapdoor Snails lack a lung, which means they don’t need to surface to suck in frigid (and potentially deadly) oxygen in the winter. They’re ideal for harsher northern climates.

Hiding Places
When the spring and summer sunshine warms the water, you might not see your snails. They like to hang out on the bottom of ponds, and they blend in incredibly well with rocks, gravel and plants. But they’re hard at work doing what they do best – eating algae and the detritus that feeds it. They also do a great job grooming plants and keeping your rocks and plant pots algae-free.

Strength in Numbers
For maximum algae-eating benefit, we recommend housing a minimum of 10 snails per 50 square feet of pond. If you have a farm pond or larger water feature, you’ll need at least 200 snails to have any effect at all. Remember that they will reproduce a few times a year, and tiny newborn snails are hungry!

Aerated Water, Happy Snails: Keep those helpful gastropods happy all year-long by providing plenty of oxygen-rich water. The best way to do that is by aerating your pond with a subsurface aeration system, like the PondAir™ Aeration Kit. Featuring two air stones and flexible black vinyl air tubing, an adjustable unit like this will infuse your pond with oxygen while remaining whisper quiet.

Pond Talk: Have you had success controlling algae in your water feature with snails?

Breathe Life Into Your Pond - Pond Logic (r) PondAir(t) Aeration Kits

What color pond dye will work best in my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: What color pond dye will work best in my pond?

Q: What color pond dye will work best in my pond?

Brian – Kansas City, KS

A: Pond dye is great stuff. It not only enhances your pond or lake’s aesthetic appeal with hues that compliment your landscape, but it also shades the water from the sun’s rays, preventing pesky algae growth and helping you maintain a healthy pond.

Pond dye color is really a matter of personal preference, but different shades are better suited to different situations.

  • Do you have a decorative pond? Try Nature’s Blue dye – our customers’ favorite choice. It’s the ideal color for ornamental water features as it contrasts perfectly with lush green landscaping.
  • Do you prefer a more natural look? Try Twilight Blue dye. It maintains a neutral blackish-blue tint that shades and protects your pond without making drastic changes to its natural coloring.
  • Do you want to showcase your landscape? Consider using Black DyeMond dye. It creates a mirrored surface that reflects surrounding trees and natural rocky landscapes, making it perfect for natural ponds in wooded areas.

We recommend you use pond dye year-round. Pond Logic® Pond Dye is a concentrated formula that you simply pour in several spots along your pond’s edge. Apply it monthly or as needed to maintain the blue or black hue all year long. Pond Logic® Pond Dye PLUS is the same formula as our traditional pond dye – but we’ve added beneficial bacteria to the mix to help keep your pond looking crystal clear.

Pond Talk: What’s your favorite pond dye – and why?

Protect and Shade Your Pond- Pond Logic(r) Pond Dye

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