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Do I need to put a net over my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A


Q: Do I need to put a net over my pond?

Q: Do I need to put a net over my pond?

Fred – Chicago, IL

A: With fall approaching, we’ve been talking a lot about why and how you should cover your pond with a net. A net’s purpose—to prevent leaves and debris from landing in your water garden and decomposing into muck—is fairly obvious, but is it a requirement?

Nope. Just because you have a pond doesn’t mean you need to cover it with a net.

When considering whether you should add one to your fall prepping kit, first take a look around. Is your yard (or your neighbor’s) filled with deciduous trees or needle-dropping conifers?

If so, you will need to cover your pond with The Pond Guy® Fine Mesh Pond Netting or The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ to protect it from the falling leaves and needles.

  • Pond Netting: Made with clear, heavy-duty 1/8-inch mesh in a variety of sizes to fit most ponds, the Fine Mesh Pond Netting will keep your water garden protected from small, stubborn debris like pine needles while still allowing for sunlight penetration and aesthetic enjoyment. It comes with plastic stakes to keep it in place.
  • PondShelter: In addition to its 16-foot-by-11-foot swath of ¼-inch mesh netting, the PondShelter™ Kit includes a fully adjustable aluminum frame that easily adjusts to most landscapes, along with 30 metal stakes to keep it securely in place.

If your skies are clear from leaf- and needle-dropping trees, you don’t need pond netting—but you will need to pull out your 3-in-1 Interchangeable Pond Tool to manually remove any leaves and debris that do land in your pond. Even if you have no trees in your yard, stragglers will inevitably blow in, and so you should be prepared to fish them out with this handy-dandy telescoping tool.

Whether you need a net to shelter your pond or a handheld net to manually remove debris, make sure you keep yourself covered by using Seasonal Defense®. The beneficial bacteria in this cool-water product will go to work breaking down any muck that does wind up building up.

Pond Talk: What tips do you have for new hobbyists fitting a net onto their pond for the first time?

Keep Leaves & Debris Out - The Pond Guy(r) Fine Mesh Pond Netting

One Response

  1. FIRST TIMER, I USE STEEL FENCE POSTS. TALL ONES IN THE CENTER ENDS, ( 7 FT ) OUT TO ( 5 FT ) THEN ( 3 FT ). MAKE SURE TO PUT ( 2-21/2 FT) IN THE GROUND. TIE IT OFF IN A TEPEE FORMATION. THE HIGH CENTER POSTS TO LOWER. MINE IS (25X19 ) IT TAKES ( 2 PEOPLE ) TO NET IT. FOR SMALLER PONDS, POND GUY HAVE NETS FOR THEM, WHICH LOOK GOOD, & EASY TO HANDLE. THE FIRST OF SEPTEMBER. OR LATE AUGUST ADD MICRO-LIFT/SLUDGE AWAY ,THEY CAN TELL YOU HOW MUCH YOU NEED. I ADD IT IN EARLY SPRING FOR WHEN DUCKS ARE AROUND. BREAKS DOWN LEAVES & CONTROLS BROWN WATER PLUS FISH WASTE. I CLEAN MINE ONCE A YEAR, EVERY EARLY SPRING.
    (18) INCHES – (5) FT. DEEP,& (8.5) TONS OF ROCK IN IT.
    GOOD LUCK — PONDGUY, WILL HELP YOU !! THEY ARE GOOD !!
    YOUR PONDERING FRIEND — GREG J.

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