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Why is there fog on my pond in the mornings? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: Why is there fog on my pond in the mornings?

Q: Why is there fog on my pond in the mornings?

Joann – Knoxville, TN

A: An enshrouding and ethereal harbinger of fall, misty morning fog conjures a sense of mystery—but why the fog appears isn’t so mysterious once you understand what it is and how it forms.

Fog Defined

Fog is simply a concentration of low-lying water vapor in the air. In the fall, these tiny liquid water droplets often form over bodies of water like your pond or lake.

Temperature Mix

Fog forms when cool air and warm water meet and, more specifically, when the difference between the temperature and the dew point is less than 4° Fahrenheit.

You see, in your pond, the water, heated by the sun, stays warmer than the air temperature during the cool night. When the cold layer of still air settles over your pond, warm water vapor from the pond evaporates, entering the cool air above it. The cool air then traps the concentrated water vapor and fog forms. In the morning, as the sun heats the air and temperatures rise, the water vapor evaporates and dispels.

Fog Fighters

If you don’t like fog and prefer to use your pond early in the morning before the misty stuff dissipates, consider installing one of Kasco’s Decorative Fountains. A fountain adds oxygen to the pond—but that’s not all. It also creates movement above the water, which prevents cool air from settling on the water surface. This will help prevent fog from forming.

Pond Talk: Are you a fan of fog on your pond or lake? Why or why not?

Add Tranquility & Peace to Your Pond - Kasco V-Spray Pattern Fountains

Do I need to put a net over my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: Do I need to put a net over my pond?

Q: Do I need to put a net over my pond?

Fred – Chicago, IL

A: With fall approaching, we’ve been talking a lot about why and how you should cover your pond with a net. A net’s purpose—to prevent leaves and debris from landing in your water garden and decomposing into muck—is fairly obvious, but is it a requirement?

Nope. Just because you have a pond doesn’t mean you need to cover it with a net.

When considering whether you should add one to your fall prepping kit, first take a look around. Is your yard (or your neighbor’s) filled with deciduous trees or needle-dropping conifers?

If so, you will need to cover your pond with The Pond Guy® Fine Mesh Pond Netting or The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ to protect it from the falling leaves and needles.

  • Pond Netting: Made with clear, heavy-duty 1/8-inch mesh in a variety of sizes to fit most ponds, the Fine Mesh Pond Netting will keep your water garden protected from small, stubborn debris like pine needles while still allowing for sunlight penetration and aesthetic enjoyment. It comes with plastic stakes to keep it in place.
  • PondShelter: In addition to its 16-foot-by-11-foot swath of ¼-inch mesh netting, the PondShelter™ Kit includes a fully adjustable aluminum frame that easily adjusts to most landscapes, along with 30 metal stakes to keep it securely in place.

If your skies are clear from leaf- and needle-dropping trees, you don’t need pond netting—but you will need to pull out your 3-in-1 Interchangeable Pond Tool to manually remove any leaves and debris that do land in your pond. Even if you have no trees in your yard, stragglers will inevitably blow in, and so you should be prepared to fish them out with this handy-dandy telescoping tool.

Whether you need a net to shelter your pond or a handheld net to manually remove debris, make sure you keep yourself covered by using Seasonal Defense®. The beneficial bacteria in this cool-water product will go to work breaking down any muck that does wind up building up.

Pond Talk: What tips do you have for new hobbyists fitting a net onto their pond for the first time?

Keep Leaves & Debris Out - The Pond Guy(r) Fine Mesh Pond Netting

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