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The geese are really making a mess. How can I prevent them from using my pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: The geese are really making a mess. How can I prevent them from using my pond?

Q: The geese are really making a mess. How can I prevent them from using my pond?

Dawn – Ripon, WI

A: Geese can certainly make a mess of a lake’s shoreline—and that mess is unsightly. The best way to keep that mess off your lawn and pond is to prevent geese from stopping in the first place!

One of the best ways to do that is to put up a decoy. They’re designed to dissuade the mess makers from choosing your shoreline for their home.

Swan Decoy: Swans and geese make similar nesting areas, but they don’t flock together. In fact, swans are quite territorial and aggressive toward geese—especially when there are baby swans in the mix. So when geese see a swan decoy, like the Floating Swan Decoy, they will fly on by to find a lake or pond that’s not inhabited by their grumpy cousins.

Alligator Decoy: Whether your lake is in Florida, Wisconsin or Oregon, your resident geese will scatter when an alligator decoy, like the Gator Guard Decoy, is deployed. Geese instinctively fear alligators, even if they’ve never seen one before.

Coyote Decoy: Geese (and just about every other critter) do not like coyotes. The 3D Coyote Decoy looks lifelike from all angles, particularly when the wind blows and moves its tail and body. Geese will spot this movement from a great distance and steer clear of it. Nesting birds and other rodents will not want to seek refuge anywhere near your property if they spot this lurking predator in the open!

When using decoys to deter geese, don’t forget to move them around every few days. If you leave them in the same spot, the geese will realize it’s a fake and move in.

Here’s a fun fact for you: Geese are flightless for one month beginning in late June through early August. They are in a serious molting period. So, it’s best to keep them away prior to being grounded.

Pond Talk: What are some other ways to keep geese off your property?

Keep Pesky Geese Away - OrnaMates(tm) Floating Swan Decoy

My water garden has turned green. Will a UV light help my pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: My water garden has turned green. Will a UV light help my pond?

Q: My water garden has turned green. Will a UV light help my pond?

Al – Mount Holly, NJ

A: Ultraviolet bulbs can work wonders in an algae-filled pond, particularly one in full sunlight. As the green water passes by the light, concentrated UV rays damage the tiny plants, ultimately killing them.

UV clarifiers work well and can certainly help your pond, but they shouldn’t be your primary method of algae control. Before investing in a UV unit, check your mechanical and biological filtration first.

Mechanical Filtration

Did you perform a thorough spring cleanout of your pond? Is your filter overloaded with debris? Do you need to wash out or replace your filer pads? Is the system sized appropriately for your pond? You may need to make some filtration upgrades. The Pond Guy® AllClear™ Pressurized UV Filter adds mechanical and biological filtration as well as a UV clarifier, giving you three types of filtration in one unit.

Biological Filtration

In addition to checking your mechanical filtration system, you should also make sure you’re following a regular maintenance routine by adding Nature’s Defense® and Muck Defense® to your pond. A healthy population of beneficial bacteria—your biological filtration—will keep the nutrient load in check, which will starve the algae out of your pond.

UV Clarifier

If your mechanical and biological filtration are taken care of and your water is still too green to enjoy your koi and goldfish, consider a UV light. Here are some tricks for choosing the right one:

  • Wattage: The first trick to getting the best results is to pick a UV bulb that has a high enough wattage for your pond’s volume. All UV clarifiers are rated based on pond size. The larger the wattage, the larger the pond size the UV clarifier can handle.
  • Flow Rate: The second trick is to pump the water past the bulb at just the right flow rate. Pushing water past the UV light too fast can render it ineffective, while pushing the water too slow can cause the UV clarifier to act like a sterilizer, killing not only algae but your beneficial bacteria as well. A great rule of thumb is to push the water approximately half of what the UV is rated per hour. For example, The Pond Guy® 9-watt PowerUV™ Ultraviolet Clarifier is rated for ponds up to 1,200 gallons, so a 600 GPH pump would be ideal.

Another point to consider: Do you want an above-water UV clarifier, like the PowerUV™, or a submerged one? If you’re looking for a below-water model, check out the Pondmaster® Submersible UV Clarifier. It includes a Halo Ring that lights up to show you the unit is working.

Pond Talk: What kind of luck have you had luck using an ultraviolet clarifier?

Eliminate Discolored Water - The Pond Guy(r) PowerUV(tm)

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