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We love sitting by our pond, but the mosquitoes are active this year. How can we control them | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Q: We love sitting by our pond, but the mosquitoes are active this year. How can we control them

Q: We love sitting by our pond, but the mosquitoes are active this year. How can we control them

Scott – Tampa, FL

A: There’s nothing as irritating as a mosquito. They buzz, they bite, they feed on blood, they leave behind itchy welts and, in some cases, transmit dangerous diseases like malaria, dengue, yellow fever, West Nile virus, dog heartworm and equine encephalitis. No, they’re certainly not a welcome pondside guest!

Controlling these tiny bloodsuckers requires a four-pronged approach. Here’s what we recommend:

1. Move the Water: A female mosquito prefers to lay her eggs in stagnant water that’s full of algae, plankton, fungi and bacteria, so your first priority should be moving your water with an Airmax® Aeration System near the area where you sit. The agitated water will make her think twice about calling that part of your pond home.

2. Destroy Their Habitat: When the mosquito larvae—or wigglers—hatch, they nibble on all those tiny plants and microorganisms that are floating by as they develop into pupae—or tumblers—and, eventually, adults. So the second item on your to-do list is to cut down on all the debris around the edge of your pond, or at least in the area where you hang out the most, with a pond rake and weed cutter.

3. Put Mosquito Fish to Work: If you don’t already have a fish population living in your lake, consider adding some mosquito fish, which are small fish that gobble the wigglers and tumblers. The American Mosquito Control Association recommends adding predacious minnows or native fish to lakes and ponds for biological control of the insects.

4. Use Mosquito Dunks: If you find you’re still having problems with the vampire bugs, try some Summit® Mosquito Bits® & Dunks®. These handy-dandy little disks and crumbles contain Bt-israelensis (Bt-i), a specially formulated biological pesticide designed to destroy mosquitoes. You simply toss them in your pond or lake and they’ll provide relief for up to 30 days. Plus, they’re safe for use around fish and plants.

Unfortunately, mosquitoes are part of life with a lake or pond. But with a little aeration, physical control, biological control and, if necessary, chemical control, you can keep these irritating bloodsuckers managed so you can enjoy relaxing evenings by your pond.

Pond Talk: How do you manage mosquitoes by your lake or pond?

Eradicate Mosquitoes for 30 Days - Summit® Mosquito Bits® & Dunks®

I think there is a leak in my water garden, but how do I know? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Q: I think there is a leak in my water garden, but how do I know?

Q: I think there is a leak in my water garden, but how do I know?

Abby – Pueblo, CO

A: What a conundrum! Determining whether you have a leak in your liner—and then finding and fixing it—can be a daunting task. But with a little detective work and these step-by-step instructions, your pond will be holding water again in no time.

A Leak or the Heat?

Let’s determine if you have a leaky pond in the first place. How much water are you losing per day? And what’s the temperature outside? On hot days, it’s common to lose up to an inch of volume from your water garden—but if it’s more than that, you may have a leak.

Finding the Leak

Common places for leaks to spring include around the pond’s perimeter, the area around your waterfall and pump, and your liner. When looking for the leak’s source, follow these steps:

Step 1 – Search for a Wet Spot: First, look for wet areas around the perimeter of your pond. Is water pooling somewhere? Are the weeds thicker or the grass lusher in one area than another? Check the low-lying areas where the liner may not be properly supported. If nothing looks amiss, head over to your waterfall pump.

Step 2 – Leak Check: The easiest way to determine whether the leak is in your liner or in your waterfall box is to turn off the waterfall pump (but keep your aeration going so the water stays aerated) and leave it alone for a few hours. When you come back:

  1. Is the water level the same? If so, your liner is not the culprit so you’ll need to check for problems with your waterfall box.
  2. Has the water level dropped? If so, you have a leaky liner. Jump to step 4.

Step 3 – Waterfall Worries: If your waterfall or waterfall box is the source of your leak, follow these steps to determine where the water could be escaping:

  1. Connections: First check the connections from the pump to the box. Are they loose and dripping, or are they tight?
  2. Cracks in the Box: Next, take a look at the waterfall box itself. Are there any cracks? Is the liner properly attached?
  3. Stream Leaks: Finally, inspect the rocks and liner around the waterfall and stream, making adjustments are needed. Try using some Waterfall Foam to stop water from flowing behind the rocks.

Step 4 – Your Leaky Liner: Finding a hole in a liner isn’t easy. But with a little perseverance, you can locate it and repair it. Here’s how:

  1. Track the Leak: Use Pond Logic® Pond Shade to visually track the leak. Simply add a few drops on the side and watch it as it finds its way to the leak. This will take some time, a few attempts—and patience.
  2. Let It Be: If you have trouble finding it with Pond Shade, let the water slowly go down. (Depending how low it goes, you may need to temporarily relocate your fish.) The water level should stabilize, which will allow you to visually inspect the first few inches of liner above the water surface for the hole.
  3. Repair the Leak: Once you find the hole, patch it up with self adhesive Liner Patch or use some Gold Label Pond Sealer.

Good luck with your search!

Pond Talk: Have you ever had a leak in your pond? How did you find out where it was coming from?

Control Water Flow - Atlantic® Waterfall Foam

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