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How do I know if my pond is covered in pollen or algae? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A


Q: How do I know if my pond is covered in pollen or algae?

Q: How do I know if my pond is covered in pollen or algae?

John – Noblesville, IN

A: Get on your sleuthing hat. Now that summer has arrived, the warm days can trigger both algae blooms and pollen bursts from flowering plants—both of which obscure the clean, sparkling water in your pond or lake. In order to clear things up, you need to first figure out whether it’s algae or pollen. Here are two clues to follow …

TEXTURE

Run your hand over the water surface and see what happens. Does the discoloration break apart at the surface or does it go deeper?

Algae that forms in ponds comes in two types—planktonic and filamentous. Planktonic algae is suspended in the water column, giving the water a pea-soup like appearance. Filamentous algae looks like long threads that grow from the bottom up and intertwine to form mats, commonly referred to as pond scum. When you run your fingers through the water, neither type of algae breaks apart.

Pollen, however, will break apart when agitated. It simply settles on the pond’s surface, giving it an oil slick-like appearance, and does not sink into the water column unless a heavy rain comes through.

COLOR

Next, take a close look at the color of what’s floating on your pond. Pollen, planktonic algae and filamentous algae can give a lake’s surface an off-colored hue.

The planktonic algae, which are microscopic plants, and the filamentous algae strings and mats color the water different shades of green, blue-green, brown or variations in between.

The pollen, however, often tints the water lighter green, yellow or white depending on what plants are releasing pollen spores into the air. Your deducing process can become complicated, however, if you have a combination of pollen sitting on top of a layer of algae!

IT’S ELEMENTARY!

Whether you’ve decided it’s algae or pollen, we have a solution for you: aeration.

A subsurface Airmax® Aeration System keeps pond and lake water circulating, which prevents the algae from forming and the pollen from coalescing into an unsightly slick. It also pumps oxygen into the water, which keeps your plants and fish happy and healthy.

Above the water, a Kasco Decorative Fountain will keep pollen at bay by spraying wet stuff up and over the pond’s surface, causing ripples that prevent the slicks from forming. Plus, they add movement and drama to your pond.

Pond Talk: How do you break up the pollen that forms on your pond or lake?

Add Movement & Drama To Your Pond - Kasco Decorative Fountain

2 Responses

  1. We’ve read that the action of rain on a pond surface beats the oxygen out of the water and stratifies the CO2 levels in the lower layers…is this correct?

    • Alex – When discussing ponds, we typically tend to lean more toward Dissolved Oxygen levels instead of CO2. There are multiple factors that come into play here, which leads to a muddy response. It depends on: the time of year, pond depth & size, current water conditions, temperatures. When it rains, it’s not really beating oxygen out of the pond. When a pond is stratified, the top layer is warmer and contains the most oxygen. The bottom layer is colder, denser and lacks oxygen. If temperatures have been warm and the pond receives a heavy rainfall, the water can flip (cold water on top, warm water on the bottom) which can cause a host of issue including fish kills. The best thing we can do for ponds so this doesn’t occur is to aerate. Aeration will eliminate the thermocline, keep Dissolved Oxygen levels high and create a uniform temperature throughout the pond.

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