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How early in the spring should I start using the Seasonal Defense® in my Pond Logic® DefensePAC®? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

How Early In The Spring Should I Start Using The Seasonal Defense® In My Pond Logic® DefensePAC®? How early in the spring should I start using the Seasonal Defense® in my Pond Logic® DefensePAC®?

Marilyn – Jackson, MI

When maintaining a crystal-clear pond in cooler seasons, Seasonal Defense® is your best friend. Seasonal Defense® accelerates the decomposition of leaves, scum, and sediment that create pond muck during the fall and winter months.

Using Seasonal Defense® to maintain your pond through the cooler part of the season will gives you a head start on summer pond management. Seasonal Defense® replenishes winter bacteria loss, jump-starts your biological filters and breaks down unwanted waste. Once your pond is running for the season and water temperatures are above 40 degrees, start using Seasonal Defense® every week for about a month, or until the water is above 50 degrees. At this point you can start using the rest of the DefensePAC®. Don’t have your DefensePAC® yet? Now’s the best time!

Pond Logic Seasonal Defense

How Do I Revive My Aeration System After Storing It For The Entire Winter? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

How Do I Revive My Aeration System After Storing It For The Entire Winter?

Q: How Do I Revive My Aeration System After Storing It For The Entire Winter?

John – Sumner, IA

A: If you turned your aerator off and stored it for the winter they are a few quick steps you can take to have your aeration system prepped and installed for the spring. If your winter has been anything like ours in southeastern Michigan, spring already seems upon us.

Here’s 4 ways to prep and install your aeration system for spring.

1.)  Change the Air Filter: The air filter is vital for providing clean air through the compressor. With a clogged air filter, performance diminishes and over time can cause irreversible damage to the compressor. We recommend changing your air filter every 3-6 months depending on the environment.

2.)  Check for Air: Before installing the unit and connecting airlines it is best to do a quick check for air. Turn the unit on and ensure air is coming out of the flex hose(s). If you have a multiple diffuser plate system, make sure that the valves are not completely shut off. In the event where air is not coming from the flex hoses, you may need a maintenance kit to replace worn seals.

3.)  Reinstall the unit: To reinstall the unit, you’ll want to reposition the cabinet so it is sitting level, reconnect the airlines and plug it in. Adjust the airflow as needed, which you’ll need to do anyway if you have multiple diffuse plates. Adjust the flow so each air plate receives equal amounts of airflow and keep in mind that longer runs and deeper plates will require more airflow to operate than shallow plates and shorter lines. It usually takes a few minutes between adjustments to see the effect at the diffuser plant, so be patient!

4.)  Proper start up: Introduce your aeration system slowly in the beginning, and gradually increase its running time each day. Start by running it for an hour the first day, two hours the second day, doubling the amount of time each day until you can successfully run it for 24 hours. If you run the system immediately for 24 hours upon returning it to the pond, you could cause the warm and cold layers of water to mix too quickly which may harm fish.

These quick steps will ensure your aeration system is back up and running to keep your pond clean, clear and healthy for years to come.

POND TALK: Do you use your pond for recreation in the winter?

Airmax® Aeration Systems - Breathe Some Life Into Your Pond

Fountain Basics – Spring Maintenance & Re-Installation | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Pond Season Has Begun!

Fountain Basics – Spring Maintenance & Re-Installation

When the weather warms and the ice on your lake melts, it’s time to kick off pond season! But before you dust off your boat and fishing pole, you need to do a little fountain maintenance and installation first.

If you didn’t perform regular upkeep on your fountain when you pulled it out last fall, now’s the time to do so. Here’s a quick list of to-do items before you put the fountain back in place:

  • Power wash the motor so built-up material doesn’t trap heat.
  • Inspect the cord for cuts.
  • If you have muskrats, protect the cord with ratcord.
  • Send the motor in for regular seal/oil maintenance if you haven’t done it in a few years.

Once it’s cleaned up an inspected, you can position your fountain. Be sure your mooring lines are snug enough to hold your fountain in place. If you’re anchoring it with blocks at the bottom of the pond, make sure they’re spread far enough apart so the fountain doesn’t spin from the force of the motor, which could cause the lines to get tangled.

Now is a great time to add that first dose of pond dye, too. Nature’s Blue™, Twilight Blue™ or Black DyeMond™ shade and protect the pond while enhancing its beauty. If you put the dye in at the same time as your fountain, the color will disperse evenly throughout the lake.

Pond Talk: What’s the first thing you plan to do once pond season begins?

Pond Logic® Pond Dye - Shade & Protect Your Pond

Do I have the right filtration system for my pond, or do I need to upgrade? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Do I have the right filtration system for my pond, or do I need to upgrade?

Q: Do I have the right filtration system
for my pond, or do I need to upgrade?

Dee – Russell Springs, KY

A: Pond filtration can be tricky—and confusing. Mechanical filtration is designed to remove solid matter from your pond’s water, but because there are different types and sizes of filters, determining whether you have the right one can be a challenge.

In general, pond product manufacturers offer three types of filters:

  • Waterfall or BioFalls box filter, which works in a 1,000-plus gallon pond
  • Pressurized filter, designed for ponds up to 5,000 gallons
  • In-pond filter, ideal for smaller ponds up to 1,200 gallons

If your filter is correct for your pond’s size but you’re still not achieving crystal clear results, something else could be happening below the surface.

When most people install a pond in their yard, they add a few goldfish or koi for fun and color. The filtration system included with the pond will work just fine—for a while. But before long, Mother Nature will do her thing, and those “few fish” will multiply into a pond full of fingerlings!

All those fry are a sign of a healthy pond, but they produce a lot of waste. In fact, 40 1-inch fish equal one 12-inch fish in terms of waste production. So if that pond is going to be home to all those fish, the old filter will need a little help. It’s time to upgrade to a larger filter or add a second filter.

Pressurized filters, such as The Pond Guy® AllClear™ PLUS Pressurized Filters, are an easy way to add to an existing filter. They’re easily buried in the ground for minimal visual impact, they can be run in line with your existing plumbing if you have a small waterfall, and they come in a range of sizes to fit any size pond. Plus, many models have the option of an ultraviolet light to help fight green water.

Of course, filtration isn’t the only answer. Natural bacteria and aeration greatly help water quality, too.

Pond Talk: How have you upgraded your pond’s filtration system?

3 Types of Filtration, 1 Powerful Unit - AllClear™ PLUS Pressurized UV Filters

Why do I need aquatic plants in my water garden? When should I get them? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Why do I need aquatic plants in my water garden? When should I get them?

Q: Why do I need aquatic plants in my water garden? When should I get them?

Melissa – Sedalia, MO

A: It’s a water garden, not a vegetable or flower garden, right? So why do you need plants in your pond? What purpose do they serve? Well, even if you don’t have a green thumb, there are some very good reasons why plants belong in your pond—four of them, in fact.

  • Fish Cover: First of all, floating plants like water lilies and water lettuce provide your pond’s inhabitants cover from predators and bright sun. Your koi and goldfish will appreciate the safety and shade those leaves provide, particularly when a heron comes to visit!
  • All-Natural Water Filter: Bog, floating and underwater plants, like water hyacinth, parrot’s feather and irises, naturally filter the water, too. They’re nicknamed “nature’s water filter” for a reason: They remove excess nutrients from the water while releasing oxygen during photosynthesis.
  • Habitable Habitat: Plants also create a perfect habitat for your aquatic life—both above and below the waterline—by providing food and shelter. Fish and snails hang out around the leaves and stems, frogs hunt for bugs and hide in the shade, and birds and insects flock to the flowers for nectar.
  • Aesthetics: Aquatic plants’ flowers and greenery make for some nice scenery for you, too. Imagine water lilies and irises bursting with color, and curly corkscrew rush and lizard’s tail softening the outline around the pond. Not a bad view while enjoying a balmy spring evening!

Even though Punxsutawney Phil predicted an early spring, it’s still cold outside—too cold for plants. But you can still start thinking about cultivars you’d like to grow in your water garden!

You could head down to your local water garden retailer and check out their selection, but a better option is to order plants via mail order. Simply flip through your favorite mail-order nursery catalog or check out the assortment of aquatic plants at The Pond Guy®. Place your order and voila! Your aquatic plants will be delivered in the spring.

In many cases, if you place your order early the nursery will hold your order until the weather in your area is suitable to grow the plants. Another benefit of having your plants shipped: They’ll be less expensive because you’re not purchasing a full-grown potted plant. Once they arrive, they’ll need some time to grow—but once they get growing and blossoming, you won’t even know the difference!

Pond Talk: What’s your favorite aquatic plant?

Add Color To Your Pond - Grower's Choice Hardy Water Lilies

Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond?

Q: Can I add barley to my 1/2 acre pond?

Bill – Ashville, OH

A: Barley straw and ponds have some great chemistry. As a barley straw bale breaks down in water, it produces and releases many chemical compounds—and one of them may actually control algae growth.

How? Scientists from the Ohio State University Extension report that the compound interferes with and prevents the new growth of algae cells. As the old algae cells naturally die off, few new algae cells are produced—thereby controlling the overall algae population.

Sounds like a perfect solution for your 1/2 acre lake, right?

Well, barley straw will technically work to control algae in all that water—but you’ll need a ton of barley to accomplish it! More precisely, you’ll need as much as 112 pounds per 1/2 acre of surface area, according to OSU experts.

That’s great if you live next to a barley field, but that’s not a reality for most of us …

And accessibility to all those pounds of straw isn’t the only challenge. The bales are also tough to handle. In a small 1,000-gallon pond, small bales of barley straw can be used and tucked away in the filter, out of view. But in a sizable pond or lake, large bales are cumbersome to haul and position.

Not only that, but they also need to be broken apart to allow the right amount of oxygen in the middle of the bale so it properly decomposes, which means all that loose material will float to the pond’s surface and really make a mess of things.

Rather than wrangle all that barley straw, try an Airmax® Aeration System instead coupled with a beneficial bacteria product, like MuckAway. The aeration system will circulate the pond water, allowing the bacteria to break down all the muck.

Low amounts of nutrients in the pond means less food for plants and weeds—and that’s some chemistry every lake owner should understand.

Pond Talk: Do you prefer aeration and beneficial bacteria over barley straw? If so, why?

Reduce Mucky Pond Bottoms - Pond Logic® MuckAway®

Should I add a de-icer to the aerator in my water garden? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Should I add a de-icer to the aerator in my water garden?

Q: Should I add a de-icer to the aerator in my water garden?

John – Ivoryton, CT

A: Before we broach this hot topic, let’s “break the ice” with a quick look at the differences between a de-icer and an aerator.

De-Icer: A de-icer’s simple purpose is to melt a hole in the ice that has formed on a container of water, whether a koi pond, water garden or livestock trough. Unlike a heater that actually warms the water, a de-icer melts through the ice sheet, thereby allowing harmful below-surface gases to escape and life-sustaining oxygen in.

Aerator: An aerator circulates the water below the sheet of ice that forms on a pond. In areas with relatively mild winters, that subsurface water movement will keep a hole in the ice that allows harmful gases out and oxygen in—but when temps really dip, an aerator may not be enough to maintain a vent hole.

Both a de-icer and an aerator help improve oxygen levels in your pond and, therefore, keep your fish healthy and happy.

If One is Good, are Both Better?

To answer your question: Yes, your aerated pond may appreciate some help from a de-icer, particularly if you live in a region with hard freezes.

Ponds that are already outfitted with an aerator, like one of the Pond Logic® PondAir™ Aeration Kits, benefit from its water circulation—but in areas with frigid winters, those systems may need a little help keeping a hole open in the inches-thick ice. So a de-icer paired with a nearby air stone will ensure the vent hole will remain open.

The opposite is also true. If you have a de-icer in place to keep a hole open in the ice, like the K&H™ Thermo-Pond 3.0 or K&H™ Perfect Climate Pond De-Icer, it’s a great idea to couple that with aeration system. The circulating action will help to encourage the gases forming under the ice at the bottom of the pond to reach the ventilation hole and escape.

If you’re in the market for a de-icer or aeration system, consider investing in a combo unit, such as the Pond Logic® PondAir™ and Thermo-Pond 3.0 De-Icer Combo. It’s the one-two punch your pond needs to keep breathing all winter long!

Pond Talk: With the recent arctic temperatures that have plagued folks in the Midwest and northern states, how have you kept a ventilation hole in your pond or water garden?

Eliminate Harmful Gases- Farm Innovators Floating 1250 Watt De-Icer

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