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Can I leave netting over my pond during the winter months? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A


Can I leave netting over my pond during the winter months?

Q: Can I leave netting over my pond during the winter months?

Robert – Sherrard, IL

A: I don’t know about you, but the thought of one or two leaves drifting into my pristine pond after a thorough fall clean-out sends shivers down my spine—which is why, like many hobbyists, I cover my water garden with pond netting, like The Pond Guy® Premium Pond Netting, in the fall and early winter.

Even though netting makes the water feature look less than attractive, particularly during the holiday season when the yard sparkles with twinkling lights, it keeps it clean and debris-free. Not only that, but it also protects the fish from flying and four-legged predators looking for a tasty winter meal.

So why not leave the pond netting on all winter long?

In some locations, you can. If you live in a climate with mild temperatures, and minimal snow and freezing, you can leave the netting on all year-long, provided you check it regularly and remove any accumulated material.

In other locations, like those that receive heavy snowfall or freezing rain, a better place for the pond netting during the winter is in the garage. The weighty precipitation could put way too much pressure on your net, stretching it out of shape or causing it to become brittle and break.

So before the big storms start rolling through, remove your pond netting and pack it up for the season. But to keep those straggling leaves and other annoying debris out of your pond, have a handheld pond net, like The Pond Guy® 2-in-1 Heavy Duty Combo Net, readily available. The net’s 4-foot handle extends to 11 feet long, which is long enough to reach the most elusive leaf.

Pond Talk: When do you know it’s time to pack up your pond netting for the season?

Keep Leaves & Predators Out - View The Pond Guy® PondShelter™ Net Kit

12 Responses

  1. how do i get a coupon or promo code would like to purchase 2 items again.

  2. The net should come off the day before the snow flies or by mid-December whichever comes first.

  3. In Long Island, NY we have our share of racoon, fox, heron, egret and more recently a big old osprey. In addition to keeping leaves and other debris out, the net is almost mandatory in order to keep the critters out. A little unsightly maybe, but it helps keep our koi safe and sound all winter.
    Last winter was relatively mild and the pond surface barely froze over leaving our fish and frogs much more vulnerable.
    The water surface to be covered is approximately 34 X 16 ft. The center of the net eventually lays on the water surface but the net has survived many seasons and the fish don’t seem to mind.
    Just a side note; Last spring we had an osprey diving into the pond looking for a meal. Before he (or she) could do any damage I set up a system of fishing line monofilament several feet apart and 3 ft above the water surface, stretched across the pond. A few small pieces of reflective tape were added for better visibility to keep the osprey from getting injured or tangled in the line.
    The osprey did come back for a few fly overs but as far as I know, never dove in the pond again.
    An added benefit was that the fishing line seemed to greatly reduce the number of heron and egret visits. My guess is that they know they need lots of room to maneuver those long wings and legs.

  4. I have a small pond with a big tree next to it with large leaves that shed all winter and early spring. A net protects the water clarity and health of the fish. A de-icer keeps the snow from collecting and the ice from forming. I remove the netting the first time the weather is warm enough to start working the yard, usually in April in western Colorado.
    loes krane

  5. GOOD INFO POND GUY… WE LEFT OUR NET UP UNTIL THE LEAVES STOPPED FALLING… WHEN A FEW THAT STILL DROP IN THE POND WE, REMOVE THEM WITH A NET… NEXT THING TO DO, WILL BE THE HEATER. WHEN IT FREEZES A FEW DAYS IN A ROW. IT ALSO TURNS ON AND OFF, AUTOMATIC..WINTER IN THE KANSAS CITY AREA, NORMALLY IS NOT OVER BEARING.. MITCH, KANSAS 12/1/12

  6. I use pond netting(the PndGuy’s of course) here in Colorado for most of the fall and winter. You need to be aware of freezing rain or heavy snow but with the waterfall running all year, by using a simple trough heater, some beautiful snow and ice formations occur. This, along with our brightly colored fish, give us an enjoyable year round water experience. Adding solar lights allows for some awesome formations at night also. MN, Sikes Ranch, CO

    • Michael, Sounds like you have a wonderful setting year round!

    • HOW CAN U LET THE WATER FALL RUN ALL YEAR ? WE IN ILL. TURN OURS OFF,SHUTTING DOWN COMPLETELY. THE WATER FALLS ARE SHALLOW. MINE IS 18 FT LONG 3-4 IN. DEEP. CIRCULATES 5,000 GALLONS AN HOUR. BY PLACING THE PUMP IN THE WATER ALL WINTER KEEPS THE “O” RINGS FROM CRACKING. IF THE OUT PUT AREA WERE TO FREEZE,U WOULD HAVE A MESS, & NO WATER.SHALLOW END IS 18 IN. DEEP END 5 FT. BY RUNNING A 4,300 GHP. PUMP IN THE WINTER,JUST IN THE POND WITH A DEICER,KEEPS MINE OPEN. THE 5,750 GHP PUMP IS USED JUST IN THE SUMMER,IT IS 25 FT X 19.
      i run my underwater lights & above all year round.RACOONS ARE NOT DIVERS,JUST MAKE SURE THE DEPTH IS 2.5 – 3 FT DEEP. PUT A BRIM OF ROCKS AROUND IT,THE DON’T LIKE GOING DOWN HILL.MINE IS 2 – 3 FT. HIGH,NO RACCOON NOR FOXES PROBLEM. A SILVER GLASS YARD BALL ON A BIRD BATH STAND WITH PIPE PUDDY ( TO HOLD IN PLACE )KEEPS THE SQUIRRELS FROM KNOCKING IT OFF. DUCKS DON’T SEAM TO MINE THE SHINNY LIGHT. OTHER BIRDS LIKE HERON DO. GOOD LUCK. GREG

      • Hi Greg – Leaving a waterfall running all year long can be tricky for those of us in northern climates, but it is not totally impossible. Here’s a blog we did recently on it:

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