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How Do You Divide Water Lilies? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

How Do You Divide Water Lilies?

Cindy – Galesburg, IL

Dividing lilies may seem somewhat complicated, but our step-by-step process will explain exactly what you need to do. Try to plan it so you divide them during your spring cleanout, which would give easy access to tubers. Dividing is necessary every two to three years, and it is helpful if you notice the lily grew mostly pads and few lilies over the past season.

Step 1: Remove lilies from pond or container and rinse off. Plant baskets are ideal containers until they are ready to be moved to the pond.

Step 2: Trim away root growth and old foliage.

Step 3: Cut the tuber down to size. You can safely cut the tuber down between two to three inches on the growing part with a sharp knife. This can be increased to five to six inches on longer plants. Remember to also cut off new buds and older leaves, so that the new root system has a chance to grow.

Step 4: Plant each tuber separately or discard if you wish to reduce the lilies’ quantity in your pond. Use plant fertilizer and planting media for best results and a continuing healthy pond.

Step 5: Replant them shallow in the pond until new growth begins.

Step 6: Upon new growth lilies can be moved deeper into the pond.

TetraPond® LilyGro™ Aquatic Plant Food

I Want To Build My Own Pond. How Do I Go About Planning It Out? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

I Want To Build My Own Pond. How Do I Go About Planning It Out?

William – Scottsboro, AL

There are a number of considerations that need to be made when planning for a large pond. These basic and important tips will help make sure you are on the right track and well prepared for constructing and maintaining the large pond that’s right for you.

Purpose– What do you want to use your pond for? If for fishing, plan for depth and habitat. If for swimming, consider implementing a shallow beach and gradual slopes.

Shape – What do you want your pond to look like? Ponds with uniform shape are often easier to care for as they typically posses less shoreline and can be circulated with less obstruction.

Size – How big do your want your pond to be? The size of your yard can play a large role in determining pond size. Purpose is an equally important factor; do you want to use your pond for swimming and skating?

Surroundings – What will be around your pond? Avoid areas that introduce excessive amounts of debris. Runoff and foliage are two common contributors to pond muck. Berm the edges of your pond to prevent runoff and distance trees away from the shoreline.

Depth – How deep should your pond be? A typical depth for a large pond is six to eight feet, though if you plan on stocking specific fish such as walleye you will want to increase the depth to provide adequate habitat.

Airmax® Informational DVD

Do Snails Need To Be Acclimated When Being Added To My Pond? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Do Snails Need To Be Acclimated When Being Added To My Pond? Do Snails Need To Be Acclimated When Being Added To My Pond?

Bonnie – Fallston, MD

Like fish, snails also need to be acclimated to a pond. It may seem strange since the anatomy of a fish and snail are so different, but snails like the Japanese Trapdoor are also susceptible to shock from early-season chilly waters if they are not acclimated. However, these snails are best for pond life because they are live bearing and don’t reproduce as quickly.

Acclimating snails is the same process as acclimating fish to new pond water. Upon arrival, leave the snails in the bag and float it in the pond for 10 to 15 minutes. Once you have floated the bag you will want to remove the snails from the most newspaper and place them in the pond. By then they should be acclimated to the temperature and be fine.

Black Japanese Trapdoor Snails

When Should I Put My Heron Decoy Out? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

When Should I Put My Heron Decoy Out?

When Should I Put My Heron Decoy Out?

Michael – Brenham, TX

Pond owners everywhere use Heron Decoys to protect their fish from becoming a quick meal. While using heron decoys can be a very useful tool for keeping herons at bay, knowing when to actually place them pond-side makes the difference between deterring a predator and attracting unwanted attention.

In the northern hemisphere the heron mating season generally lasts from April to May but can sometimes extend into early June. If used too early, your decoy will actually attract a heron or two as they will be searching for potential mates. Use your decoy at the end of the mating season to give herons the impression that your pond is already claimed. Since herons are territorial they will try to find a pond of their own and move on.

Placement is also important to consider when using the decoy. Herons are smart and patient animals and may investigate your decoy if they find it suspicious. For best results place your decoy at the edge of the pond and move it daily. Make sure the decoy is standing upright and not in any unnatural poses.

Why Does My Pond Water Turn Green? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Why Does My Pond Water Turn Green? Why Does My Pond Water Turn Green? 

Joanne – Evans City, PA

Green water is a form of algae called planktonic algae and there are quite a few factors causing your water to be clear during the winter and green as the weather warms up. The main reason is the interruption of the nitrogen cycle.

In order for algae to grow, it needs a food source (nutrients) and sunlight. During the colder winter months of the year, nutrients within the water are less likely to increase due to the fact that the digestive systems of fish have slowed to a point where little, if any, nutrients (fish waste) are being added. Also, during the colder months, algae and aquatic plants are not as active at consuming nutrients.

As the weather warms up, fish become active, digestive systems kick back in and nutrients begin pouring in and if not held in check using aquatic plants, natural bacteria and filtration, green water will develop.

If you have chronic green water and still can’t keep it in check, consider a UV or Ion clarifier.

Aquascape IonGen Electronic Clarifier

How Do I Treat Duckweed? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

How Do I Treat Duckweed?

How Do I Treat Duckweed?

Tim – Rock Hall, MD

Duckweed is a very small floating plant about the size of a pencil eraser. It has shoe-sole shaped leaves with a small, hair-like root hanging below. Since duckweed floats on the surface of the pond, it is commonly mistaken for and treated as if it is algae. Unfortunately, algaecides have no effect on duckweed but there are a couple treatments you can do to keep the prolific duckweed at bay.

The Short-Term Solution
To treat duckweed as well as other aquatic weeds on a short-term basis, you can use Ultra PondWeed Defense® . This product is great for a one-time treatment or for spot treating. These are, however, only short-term solutions for duckweed. Due to their aggressive nature, duckweed can grow back in as little as 3 to 4 weeks. This is why we suggest a longer-term solution.

The Long-Term Solution
One of the only products on the market to provide long-term, season-long control of duckweed and other aquatic weeds is called Sonar™ A.S. Instead of having to spray the plant directly, Sonar™ A.S. is sprayed directly into the water. Sonar™ A.S. works by preventing photosynthesis in aquatic plants and by doing so causes them to slowly parish. Treating duckweed and other aquatic plants in this fashion allows for complete control of the entire water body for the season instead of just a few weeks.

Fish Acclimation In 4 Simple Steps | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

I Overwintered My Fish Indoors This Season. How Should I Go About Placing Them Back Into My Pond? I Overwintered My Fish Indoors This Season. How Should I Go About Placing Them Back Into My Pond?

Tamara – Rapid City, SD

Re-introducing your fish to their summer home can be a safe and simple process if you follow these 4 simple steps:

Perform A Pond Cleanout – Clean your rocks, waterfall, filters and pond equipment. If stuck-on debris are slowing you down, use some Pond Logic® Oxy-Lift™ to speed up the process. Be sure to clean out any bottom-dwelling muck and skim out floating debris. Most people drain their ponds for easier access to the entire pond. If you are not up to the task then perform at least a 20% water change.

Seed & Start Your Filers – Once you refill the pond, replace or clean filter media pads and secondary media like The Pond Guy® BioBalls™. Use Microbe-Lift® PL Gel to introduce beneficial bacteria and reduce filter seed time. Once everything is back in place, start your pumps and let the water flow.

Test The Water – Use a water test kit to ensure pond water is balanced and safe for your fish. A good test kit will include tests for ammonia, nitrite and pH levels as these directly impact the health of your fish. We always recommend adding Water Conditioner or Stress Reducer PLUS to your pond after water changes to detoxify harmful contaminates in well and city water.

Acclimate Your Fish – Water temperature and composition will be different than their winter housing, so it is important to slowly introduce them to their new home. Bring fish out in a bucket and periodically add a small amount of pond water every 5-10 minutes. This will give your fish time to adjust to the water variations and avoid shock. After 15-20 minutes it will be safe to gently release the fish back into their home.

Microbe-Lift® PL Gel

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