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My water is brown, what should I do? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q&A

My water is brown. What should I do?

My water is brown. What should I do?
Andrew – Memphis, TN

Before we can answer that question, you’ll have to do some sleuthing. Why? Because water that looks brown many not actually be brown. Fortunately, there’s a simple way to figure it out – and there are simple ways to clear up the issue – regardless how the test turns out.

The test, of course, is highly scientific, so pay careful attention to the following steps:

Get a clear glass from your kitchen cabinet.
Take the glass to your pond, and scoop it full of pond water.
Look at the water in the glass.

Whew. Good work. Now that you’ve completed the heavy lifting, consider the water you’re observing. If it’s clear, you’ve learned that the brown you’re seeing is nothing more than the decaying leaves and debris at the bottom of your pond. To remedy that problem, you’ll want to introduce the natural bacteria in Pond Logic® Muck Defense and Pond Logic® Nature Defense to your pond. These safe, hungry and beneficial bacteria will expedite the breakdown of pond bottom debris, leaving the bottom of your pond as clean as your water is clear.

If, however, the contents of your glass are brown, you’re facing a high concentration of tannins, which are released into pond water by decomposing leaves. Fortunately, our Pond Logic® Activated Carbon does a terrific job of absorbing pesky tannins, leaving your water crystal clear. Simply place Activated Carbon in a mesh bag close to a high-flow area (like a skimmer or a waterfall), and wait for it to absorb the offending discoloration.

When the water clears, you might just find that the tannin-rich water has been hiding a collection of leaves and debris at the pond bottom. But with a dose of Muck Defense or Nature Defense, you’ll have things cleared up in no time at all.

Pond Talk: Have you noticed brown water forming in your pond?

Activated Carbon

What else lives in my pond besides fish? | Ponds & Lakes Q&A

What else lives in my pond besides fish?

What else lives in my pond besides fish?
James – Ida, MI

If you were scientifically inclined, you could spend a lot of time considering the complexities of a backyard pond. Despite their apparent simplicity, there’s a lot more going on in your pond than you might suspect.

The water in most ponds is stratified into different layers. While this effect is more pronounced in ponds with depths of eight feet or greater, even a shallow pond will demonstrate some degree of layering. The layers are generally defined by differences in temperature. In summer, the stratification is at its most pronounced, with lower temperatures and dissolved oxygen levels at the lower layers. In fall, the levels tend to equalize. In winter, the layering reverses, with cold water on top and warmer water at the bottom. Spring mirrors fall, with temperatures equalizing again before summer turns the entire process on its head once again.

Because dissolved oxygen levels vary according to water temperature, different layers are more attractive to different organisms. Some plant life, including algae, thrives in warmer, more oxygen-rich waters. Fish prefer consistency, and will gravitate toward water that balances cool temperature and an adequate supply of oxygen. Different types of bacteria – both beneficial and otherwise – will choose their own level. And frogs, cold-blooded creatures that they are, seek out warmth all year ‘round.

External conditions can significantly impact stratification. A heavy rain or an extended period of unseasonably cool weather, for example, can temporarily cool upper layers during summer months. This process can stress fish stocks.

Fortunately, aeration solutions like our Airmax Aeration Systems go a long way toward reducing the impact of layering in a backyard pond. When water is aerated, temperatures and oxygen levels stay uniform – making the pond safe and healthy for fish, beneficial bacteria and friendly plant life.

While they’re invisible to the eye, beneficial bacteria are a form of life every pond needs to stay clean, clear and healthy for fish and plants. With the regular use of Pond Logic® MuckAway™ Pond Muck Reducer and Pond Logic® PondClear™ Beneficial Bacteria, you’ll enhance the natural decomposition process that eliminates pond debris and fallen leaves – and increase the healthy oxygen levels necessary to sustain fish and plants all season long.

Pond Talk: Have you noticed different layers of water (with varying temperatures) in your pond?

Airmax Aeration

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