• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

Are other fish like my plecostomus as hardy over the winter as my koi? | Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Are other fish like my plecostomus as hardy over the winter as my koi?

Are other fish like my plecostomus as hardy over the winter as my koi?
Chris – Cedar Rapids, IA

With all of our talk about koi and goldfish in our pond blogs you may feel that your fish are not being properly represented. That being said, we will speak less in generalities today and focus on some other, more specific, types of fish that need a little more wintertime TLC.

It has been mentioned in past blogs that your koi and goldfish fare surprisingly well over the winter. With a little help from wheat-germ based fish food like Pond Logic Spring and Fall and an aeration system or deicer, your fish will have a successful and trouble free winter rest and be ready for action come springtime. Common goldfish like Sarassa and Shubunkins are types of winter hardy fish that can be left outside with your koi.

Other types of fish like Plecostomus, Oranda, Telescope Goldfish and Black Moors do not fare as well and will most likely benefit from being over-wintered indoors. Refer to our past blog on how to bring your water garden inside for the winter, and for pointers on indoor ponding and relocating your pond hardware.

Depending on the layout of your pond and the average winter temperatures where you live, you may have to bring all of your fish in, or you may be spared from having to relocate them at all. Your pond should ideally be around 24” deep to protect your fish from exposure to the elements outside of their pond environment in cases of both extreme heat and cold. If you experience extremely cold winters in your area there is still a chance of the pond freezing through or the remaining water being too cold. Always keep a pond thermometer on hand and keep track of water temperatures when deciding to switch fish foods or to verify if it is time to bring your fish indoors. If you live in a warmer climate you may never experience ice on your pond or even frost and therefore have no need to worry about your fish becoming potential ice cubes.

Pond Talk: Do you keep fish in your pond that need special attention during the winter months?

Manage your pond's water temperature easlily

What causes fog to form on the pond during the fall? | Ponds & Lakes Q & A

Are other fish like my plecostomus as hardy over the winter as my koi?What causes fog to form on the pond during the fall?
Bella – Forks, WA

There are few better moments than when you look out at your pond early in the morning to be greeted by a shimmering frost covered landscape accented by that light silvery veil of mist floating just over the surface of your pond. While it may be getting too cold to go out and physically enjoy the water now, your pond has seemingly endless ways to keep you entertained and inspired. So, how is it that this fog comes to rest over your water body and is it a precursor to potential problems or is it all just smoke and mirrors?

As we all know, the air that surrounds us holds moisture in the form of water vapor. While it is not normally visible to the human eye you can definitely feel it on those sticky humid days. If you have ever left a cold drink out on one of those particular days you have seen how this water vapor gathers on the outside of the glass giving the appearance that the beverage is sweating. This gathering, or condensation, of water vapor creates the appearance of fog over your pond in colder temperatures. In the morning, while the ambient air is cold, the evaporated water wicked from the warmer surface your pond condenses in that cool pocket of air to the point that you can see it. As time progresses the sun rises and the ambient air temperatures begin to rise essentially eliminating the cold air above your pond and the fog it creates. Rest assured that the presence of fog above the surface of your pond is not an omen of bad pond health or trouble to come. Enjoy the beautiful scenery created by this mysterious looking mist and take comfort in the fact that even in the cold seasons your pond never fails to perform.

Pond Talk: Have you captured any breathtaking pond pictures involving fog? Share them with other bloggers or on our Facebook page.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 137 other followers